Transport Fever

Transport Fever

317 ratings
Vehicle List - Europe
By no asbestos for you
A complete list of all purchasable vehicles in the game with their stats, ordered by appearance date, based on in-game information and the original Train Fever list made by Zaubermuffin.
 
Rate  
Favorite
Favorited
Unfavorite
General info
A little about this guide
In his original Train Fever list, Zaubermuffin said that he automated the guide creation using the game files, I assume he managed to get into either configs or the database. Unfortunately I could not automate that with Transport Fever, so the entire guide is written manually. (I did however manage to get all the vehicle pictures straight off game files) Please tell me if there are any mistakes and/or formatting mismatches, that would be greatly appreciated :)

The USA vehicle list is now available as well, check it out here :)
http://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=797939326

To-do list / Known Issues
- proofreading, checking for any mistakes, feel free to comment if you spot any :)
- multiple unit section gets messed up if viewed in a small sized window. not much i can do there unfortunately :/

Feedback and Suggestions
I'm open to all of it, the more the better :)

Special Thanks to:
- BOCHENSKI (location of vehicle configs)
- Stormmaster (rolling stock lengths)
Locomotives (1850-1927)
D 1/3 | From 1850 To 1897
This legendary railway was known as the Spanisch-Brotli-Bahn, named after a delicacy of Baden, Switzerland.




Cost: $123 K
Top speed: 40 km/h
Weight: 30 t
Power: 50 kW
Tractive effort: 15kN
Running costs: $20.5 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Length: 6.4 m

Borsig | From 1862 To 1910
Borsig was a German company based in Berlin. For that time the locomotive was a very competitive model, but it was still manufactured without a roofed cabine.




Cost: $220 K
Top speed: 45 km/h
Weight: 32 t
Power: 90 kW
Tractive effort: 20 kN
Running costs: $36.6 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Length: 12 m

Class 53 Prussian G 3 | From 1875 To 1927
The Class G 3 was a family of six-coupled, medium-powered tank locomotives for freight trains.




Cost: $388 K
Top speed: 50 km/h
Weight: 38 t
Power: 160 kW
Tractive effort: 60 kN
Running costs: $64.7 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Length: 15 m

Class 89 Prussian T 3 | From 1882 To 1932
As a 0-6-0 tank locomotive, it was the first that was built to German state railway norms.




Cost: $714 K
Top speed: 40 km/h
Weight: 30 t
Power: 290 kW
Tractive effort: 65 kN
Running costs: $119 K/year
Lifespan: 35 years
Length: 8.6 m

PLM 220 | From 1890 To 1940
The very futuristic "Big C" is a pioneer among the aerodynamic locomotives.




Cost: $1.09 M
Top speed: 60 km/h
Weight: 57 t
Power: 450 kW
Tractive effort: 75 kN
Running costs: $181 K/year
Lifespan: 35 years
Length: 16 m

A 3/5 | From 1902 To 1960
This 4-6-0 locomotive was the first locomotive of the Jura-Simplon and the Gotthard line to reach very fast speeds.




Cost: $2.47 M
Top speed: 100 km/h
Weight: 107 t
Power: 1,000 kW
Tractive effort: 120 kN
Running costs: $412 K/year
Lifespan: 35 years
Length: 19 m

Class 75.4 Baden VI c | From 1914 To 1970
Built by the Maschinebau-Gesellschaft Karlsruhe for service in south-western Germany, this locomotive was equipped with larger wheels and a longer, fixed wheelbase.




Cost: $1.42 M
Top speed: 90 km/h
Weight: 76 t
Power: 580 kW
Tractive effort: 90 kN
Running costs: $237 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Length: 12 m

Ce 6/8 II Crocodile | From 1921 To 1971
Swiss electric locomotive known as the Crocodile, mainly used for heavy freight trains on sinuous routes like the Gotthard line.




Cost: $2.91 M
Top speed: 75 km/h
Weight: 128 t
Power: 1,200 kW
Tractive effort: 150 kN
Running costs: $485 K/year
Lifespan: 45 years
Length: 21 m

Class A3 Flying Scottsman | From 1925 To 1975
The Flying Scottsman is an express passenger train that has operated between Edinburgh and London, the capitals of Scotland and England, via the East Coast Main Line.




Cost: $4.16 M
Top speed: 120 km/h
Weight: 98 t
Power: 1,655 kW
Tractive effort: 135 kN
Running costs: $693 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Length: 20 m

Ae 4/7 | From 1927 To 1980
A very commonplace locomotive from Switzerland, very hardwearing to the so called "Buchli" drive.




Cost: $5.68 M
Top speed: 100 km/h
Weight: 121 t
Power: 2,300 kW
Tractive effort: 196 kN
Running costs: $947 K/year
Lifespan: 45 years
Length: 17 m
Locomotives (1935-2000)
Class A4 | From 1935 To 1985
A streamlined 4-6-2 steam locomotive designed by Nigel Gresley for the London and North Eastern Railway. The "4468 Mallard" still holds the world record as the fastest steam locomotive.




Cost: $5.11 M
Top speed: 145 km/h
Weight: 105 t
Power: 1,986 kW
Tractive effort: 150 kN
Running costs: $851 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Length: 21 m

Class E 94 | From 1938 To 1995
This heavy freight locomotive was built for the Deutsche Reichsbahnsinfe 1940 and is commonly known as the German Crocodile.




Cost: $7.35 M
Top speed: 90 km/h
Weight: 119 t
Power: 3,000 kW
Tractive effort: 363 kN
Running costs: $1.22 M/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Length: 19 m

Re 4/4 | From 1948 To 2005
A light-weight locomotive for fast passenger trains, the first in Switzerland equipped with bogies.




Cost: $4.80 M
Top speed: 125 km/h
Weight: 57 t
Power: 1,900 kW
Tractive effort: 135 kN
Running costs: $800 K/year
Lifespan: 55 years
Length: 15 m

NoHAB AA16 | From 1954 Onwards
This diesel-electric locomotive was a European variant of the American F-series from GM.




Cost: $3.64 M
Top speed: 120 km/h
Weight: 108 t
Power: 1,450 kW
Tractive effort: 200 kN
Running costs: $607 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Length: 20 m

Class V 100 | From 1958 Onwards
This diesel-hydraulic locomotive was produced for non-electrified branch lines as a replacement for steam locomotives.




Cost: $1.98 M
Top speed: 90 km/h
Weight: 62 t
Power: 809 kW
Tractive effort: 177 kN
Running costs: $330 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Length: 14 m

Class 1042 | From 1960 Onwards
The Class 1042 was a class of electric locomotives operated by the Austrian Federal Railways.




Cost: $8.45 M
Top speed: 140 km/h
Weight: 84 t
Power: 3,300 kW
Tractive effort: 260 kN
Running costs: $1.41 M/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Length: 16 m

Class 103 | From 1970 Onwards
This fast and heavy electric locomotive was, for a long period, the flagship of the German rolling stock.




Cost: $16.0 M
Top speed: 200 km/h
Weight: 114 t
Power: 5,940 kW
Tractive effort: 314 kN
Running costs: $2.67 M/year
Lifespan: 45 years
Length: 20 m

Class 218 | From 1971 Onwards
A diesel-hydraulic locomotive from Germany buil from medium to heavy trains.




Cost: $6.40 M
Top speed: 140 km/h
Weight: 80 t
Power: 2,500 kW
Tractive effort: 235 kN
Running costs: $1.07 m/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Length: 17 m

Class 185 | From 2000 Onwards
The double voltage Class 185 was meant for international operation and was also dubbed Europalok.




Cost: $10.9 M
Top speed: 160 km/h
Weight: 84 t
Power: 4,200 kW
Tractive effort: 300 kN
Running costs: $1.82 /year
Lifespan: 50 years
Length: 20 m

Class 246 | From 2000 Onwards
In this diesel locomotive the fuel tank occupies the same space as the transformer in the electric version.




Cost: $5,21 M
Top speed: 160 km/h
Weight: 80 t
Power: 2,000 kW
Tractive effort: 240 kN
Running costs: $869 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Length: 19 m
Multiple Units
CLe 2/4 Red Arrow | From 1935 To 1992
This single unit express rail car was very popular in Switzerland.




Cost: $1.70 M
Capacity: 18
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 125 km/h
Weight: 33 t
Power: 315 kW
Tractive effort: 50 kN
Running costs: $284 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Loading speed: 2.0x
Length: 25 m

Railbus | From 1950 To 1995
These vehicles were diesel-powered, twin-axle rail busses of light construction. The motors were built into the cassis underneath the vehicle.




Cost: $763 K
Capacity: 14
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 90 km/h
Weight: 13 t
Power: 110 kW
Tractive effort: 20 kN
Running costs: $127 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Loading speed: 2.0x
Length: 14 m

RABDe 12/12 Mirage | From 1965 Onwards
This three-part electric multiple unit was used for commuter traffic in Switzerland. Combining all-axle-drive and high power, it was optimized for high acceleration. This led to the nickname "Mirage".




Cost: $9.40 M
Capacity: 64
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 125 km/h
Weight: 170 t
Power: 2,445 kW
Tractive effort: 240 kN
Running costs: $1.57 M/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 11.0x
Length: 75 m

TGV | From 1981 Onwards
The famous high speed train operated by the French national railway company. It is a permanently coupled, electric multiple unit and was built for operation between Paris and the south-east of France.





(short / standard / long)
Cost: $28.8 M / $41.7 M / $54.5 M
Capacity: 72 / 164 / 256
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 300 km/h
Weight: 265 t / 385 t / 505 t
Power: 6,450 kW
Tractive effort: 700 kN
Running costs: $4.80 M/year / $6.95 M/year / $9.09 M/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 4.0x / 8.0x / 12.0x
Length: 130 m / 207 m / 283 m

Re 450 commuter train | From 1988 Onwards
Driven by a four-axle electric locomotive, the RE 450 is often used for S-Bahn services. The locomotive even contains a luggage compartment, which is rarely used.





Cost: $13.3 M
Capacity: 99
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 130 km/h
Weight: 219 t
Power: 3,200 kW
Tractive effort: 240 kN
Running costs: $2.22 M/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 12.0x
Length: 99 m

DUALSTOX | From 2014 Onwards
This double deck electric multiple unit built by Bombarier, is equipped with tilting-compensation which allows it to pass bends faster.




Cost: $20.8 M
Capacity: 122
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 200 km/h
Weight: 200 t
Power: 3,800 kW
Tractive effort: 560 kN
Running costs: $3.47 M/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 16.0x

Passenger Wagons
D 1/3 car | From 1850 To 1905
This legendary railway was known as the Spanisch-Brotli-Bahn, named after a delicacy of Baden, Switzerland.




Cost: $94.6 K
Capacity: 6
Top speed: 40 km/h
Weight: 5.0 t
Running costs: $15.8 K/year
Lifespan: 25 years
Loading speed: 2.0x
Length: 6.4 m

Bavarian car | From 1862 To 1926
Two-axle coach with open platforms on both sides.




Cost: $155 K
Capacity: 8
Top speed: 50 km/h
Weight: 7.0 t
Running costs: $25.9 k/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 2.0x
Length: 8.5 m

Compartment car | From 1883 To 1945
This compartment coach had two doors for each compartment, one on each side of the car. It made is easy for the passengers to get in and out, but impossible for a conductor to check the tickets while driving.




Cost: $255 K
Capacity: 11
Top speed: 60 km/h
Weight: 10 t
Running costs: $42.5 k/year
Lifespan: 35 years
Loading speed: 4.0x
Length: 12 m

Three-axle car | From 1900 To 1965
Three-axle coach with open platforms on both sides, used in Germany.




Cost: $553 K
Capacity: 14
Top speed: 100 km/h
Weight: 15 t
Running costs: $92.2 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 2.0x
Length: 12 m

Donnerbuchse | From 1921 To 1985
Four-wheeled, standard, open coach made entirely of iron and steel. The lack of damping caused loud rumbling, hence the name "Thunderbox".




Cost: $672 K
Capacity: 17
Top speed: 100 km/h
Weight: 20 t
Running costs: $112 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 2.0x
Length: 13 m

BC4 | From 1935 To 1995
Four axle two bogie heavy coach for fast passenger service.




Cost: $965 K
Capacity: 20
Top speed: 120 km/h
Weight: 24 t
Running costs: $161 K/year
Lifespan: 35 years
Loading speed: 2.0x
Length: 20 m

Einheitswagen II | From 1962 Onwards
This four axle, twin bogie "Standard-Coach II" for passenger service was built in large numbers.




Cost: $1.20 M
Capacity: 21
Top speed: 140 km/h
Weight: 30 t
Running costs: $201 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Loading speed: 2.0x
Length: 24 m

Einheitswagen IV | From 1981 Onwards
The four axle, twin bodie "Standard-Coach IV" was built on the experience with the "Standard-Coach II" and had an improved interior, and air-conditioning - a first.




Cost: $1.90 M
Capacity: 22
Top speed: 200 km/h
Weight: 42 t
Running costs: $317 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Loading speed: 2.0x
Length: 27 m

Double-deck car | From 1988 Onwards
A standard double-deck train car, often used for local transport.




Cost: $1.74 M
Capacity: 33
Top speed: 130 km/h
Weight: 48 t
Running costs: $290 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 4.0x
Length: 27 m
Cargo Wagons
Open wagon | From 1850 / 1910 / 1978 To 1912 / 1980 / Onwards




Cost: $125 K / $386 K / $868 K
Capacity: 4 / 8 / 13
Cargo type: Coal, Iron Ore, Stone, Grain, Slag
Top speed: 80 km/h / 120 km/h / 160km/h
Weight: 5.0 t / 10 t / 15 t
Running costs: $20.8 K/year / $64.3 K/year / $145 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Loading speed: 1.0x / 2.0x / 3.0x
Length: 6.7 m / 10 m / 14 m

Tank wagon | From 1850 / 1910 / 1950 To 1915 / 1955 / Onwards




Cost: $156 K / $434 K / $1.00 M
Capacity: 5 / 9 / 15
Cargo type: Crude oil, Oil, Fuel
Top speed: 80 km/h / 120 km/h / 160 km/h
Weight: 6.0 t / 10 t / 15 t
Running costs: $26.0 K/year / $72.4 K/year / $167 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years / 30 years / 60 years
Loading speed: 1.0x / 2.0x / 3.0x
Length: 6.7 m / 8.3 m / 15 m

Goods wagon | From 1850 / 1910 / 1970 To 1915 / 1975 / Onwards




Cost: $125 K / $386 K / $868 K
Capacity: 4 / 8 / 13
Cargo type: Livestock, Plastic, Machines, Tools, Food, Goods
Top speed: 80 km/h / 120 km/h / 160 km/h
Weight: 5.0 t / 11 t / 18 t
Running costs: $20.8 K/year / $64.3 K/year / $145 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years / 40 years / 40 years
Loading speed: 1.0x / 2.0x / 3.0x
Length: 7.5 m / 10 m / 15 m

Stake car | From 1850 / 1890 / 1950 To 1892 / 1952 / Onwards




Cost: $125 K / $386 K / $868 K
Capacity: 4 / 8 / 13
Cargo type: Logs, Steel, Planks, Construction material
Top speed: 80 km/h / 120 km/h / 160 km/h
Weight: 5.0 t / 10 t / 17 t
Running costs: $20.8 K/year / $64.3 K/year / $145 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years / 60 years / 60 years
Loading speed: 1.0x / 2.0x / 3.0x
Length: 7 m / 11 m / 18 m
Trams
Horse tram | From 1850 To 1905
The first trams in history were horse-driven. Thanks to the rail only one horse was enough.



Cost: $17.2 K
Capacity: 5
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 15 km/h
Weight: 1.0 t
Power: 2.0 kW
Tractive effort: 2.0 kN
Running costs: $2.86 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 2.0x

Steam tram | From 1877 To 1930
Twin axle steam tram, used for example in Vienna as "Dampftramway".



Cost: $30.4 K
Capacity: 7
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 20 km/h
Weight: 8.0 t
Power: 20 kW
Tractive effort: 6.0 kN
Running costs: $5.07 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 2.0x

Halle tram | From 1887 To 1945
Twin axle electrical tram with open platforms on both ends, used by the "Allgemeine Elektricitaets-Gesellschaft Stadtbahn Halle".



Cost: $50.8 K
Capacity: 9
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 27 km/h
Weight: 12 t
Power: 50 kW
Tractive effort: 20 kN
Running costs: $8.47 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 2.0x

Ce 2/2 SchSt | From 1901 To 1975
Twin axle electrical tram from the game's home town, Schaffhausen, Switzerland.



Cost: $89.4 K
Capacity: 11
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 40 km/h
Weight: 20 t
Power: 100 kW
Tractive effort: 40 kN
Running costs: $14.9 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 4.0x

Type T1 | From 1928 To 1970
From this Type T1, built by Gothaer Waggonbau/Bothman, one unit is still running on a museum line.



Cost: $193 K
Capacity: 16
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 60 km/h
Weight: 26 t
Power: 190 kW
Tractive effort: 45 kN
Running costs: $32.2 K/year
Lifespan: 35 years
Loading speed: 4.0x

Be 4/6 Mirage | From 1966 Onwards
The big cost-overrun during the acquisition of this tram led to its nickname "Mirage", a fighter plane which also cost much more than foreseen.



Cost: $278 K
Capacity: 23
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 60 km/h
Weight: 26 t
Power: 300 kW
Tractive effort: 50 kN
Running costs: $46.4 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Loading speed: 7.0x

Be 5/6 Cobra | From 2001 Onwards
As the first complete low floor tram, it runs through the city like a snake, thanks to its four joints. This gave it the nickname "Cobra".



Cost: $424 K
Capacity: 30
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 70 km/h
Weight: 39 t
Power: 625 kW
Tractive effort: 80 kN
Running costs: $70.7 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Loading speed: 14.0x
Buses
Stage coach | From 1850 To 1907
A common stage coach used for public transportation in the early years.



Cost: $13.7 K
Capacity: 4
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 15 km/h
Weight: 1.0 t
Power: 2.0 kW
Tractive effort: 2.0 kN
Running costs: $2.29 K/year
Lifespan: 15 years
Loading speed: 1.0x

L'Obeissante | From 1870 To 1924
Built by the French Amedee Bollee, this steam omnibus was able to run bigger distances, e.g. from Le Mans to Paris.



Cost: $19.0 K
Capacity: 5
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 17 km/h
Weight: 2.0 t
Power: 4.0 kW
Tractive effort: 5.0 kN
Running costs: $3.17 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 1.0x

Landauer | From 1891 To 1942
The Landauer was basically a motor-driven carriage, built by the Benz company. As the first bus of the world, it was in use on the line Siegen-Nephten-Deuz.



Cost: $26.1 K
Capacity: 6
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 20 km/h
Weight: 2.0 t
Power: 10 kW
Tractive effort: 8.0 kN
Running costs: $4.35 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 1.0x

Postbus ET 13 | From 1905 To 1956
The ET 13 was a commonly used motor-driven bus, built in Austria.



Cost: $42.2 K
Capacity: 8
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 25 km/h
Weight: 4.0 t
Power: 20 kW
Tractive effort: 6.0 kN
Running costs: $7.03 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 1.5x

Daimler top-seater | From 1922 To 1972
An early top-seater bus, used by ABOAG, a public transportation company in Berlin, Germany.



Cost: $78.8 K
Capacity: 11
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 35 km/h
Weight: 5.0 t
Power: 45 kW
Tractive effort: 8.0 kN
Running costs: $13.1 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 1.5x

Saurer Tuscher | From 1939 To 1988
An urban public-transit bus, based on a Saurer carriage and a Tuscher car body.



Cost: $131 K
Capacity: 13
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 50 km/h
Weight: 8.0 t
Power: 80 kW
Tractive effort: 10 kN
Running costs: $21.9 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 2.0x

Mercedes Benz O 6600 | From 1954 To 2000
This city-omnibus, built by Mercedes-Benz, cost 52'785 D-mark at that time.



Cost: $197 K
Capacity: 15
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 65 km/h
Weight: 9.0 t
Power: 107 kW
Tractive effort: 12 kN
Running costs: $32.8 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 2.0x

MAN SL 192 | From 1970 Onwards
Standard public transport bus, built in big numbers.



Cost: $259 K
Capacity: 16
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 80 km/h
Weight: 16 t
Power: 141 kW
Tractive effort: 20 kN
Running costs: $43.2 K/year
Lifespan: 35 years
Loading speed: 3.0x

Berkhof Duvedec | From 1986 Onwards
Berkhof Duvedec received many good reviews of car owners for their consumer qualities.



Cost: $458 K
Capacity: 25
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 90 km/h
Weight: 15 t
Power: 180 kW
Tractive effort: 30 kN
Running costs: $76.4 K/year
Lifespan: 35 years
Loading speed: 5.0x

Volvo 5000 | From 1997 Onwards
This bus is a rear-engine, low-floor single-deck city bus with a chassis built by Volvo and bodywork by Saffle.



Cost: $369 K
Capacity: 18
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 100 km/h
Weight: 10 t
Power: 120 kW
Tractive effort: 15 kN
Running costs: $61.4K/year
Lifespan: 35 years
Loading speed: 3.0x
Trucks
Horse wagon | From 1850 To 1907
A two-horse vehicle with a simple twin axle carriage.



Cost: $13.7 K
Capacity: 4
Cargo type: (anything, except for passengers)
Top speed: 15 km/h
Weight: 1.5 t
Power: 2 kW
Tractive effort: 1.8 kN
Running costs: $2.29 K/year
Lifespan: 15 years
Loading speed: 1.0x

Horse cart | From 1870 To 1925
"A two-horse vehicle with a simple twin axle carriage."



Cost: $21.7 K
Capacity: 5
Cargo type: (anything, except for passengers)
Top speed: 20 km/h
Weight: 1.0 t
Power: 2.0 kW
Tractive effort: 2.0 kN
Running costs: $3.62 K/year
Lifespan: 20 years
Loading speed: 1.0x

DMG Cannstatt | From 1890 To 1946
Daimler Motors Corporation was a German engine and later automobile manufacturer, in operation from 1890 until 1926.



Cost: $31.6 K
Capacity: 6
Cargo type: (anything, except for passengers)
Top speed: 25 km/h
Weight: 1.0 t
Power: 14 kW
Tractive effort: 8.0 kN
Running costs: $5.27 K/year
Lifespan: 30years
Loading speed: 1.5x

Benz | From 1912 To 1975
A typical early lorry by Mercedes-Benz still running on solid rubber tires.



Cost: $65.0 K
Capacity: 8
Cargo type: (anything, except for passengers)
Top speed: 40 km/h
Weight: 1.5 t
Power: 35 kW
Tractive effort: 5.0 kN
Running costs: $10.8 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 2.0x

Opel Blitz | From 1935 To 1995
A very popular lorry from Opel, built in diverse variants.



Cost: $133 K
Capacity: 11
Cargo type: (anything, except for passengers)
Top speed: 60 km/h
Weight: 2.5 t
Power: 73.5 kW
Tractive effort: 7.0 kN
Running costs: $22.2 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 3.0x

MAN 19.304 | From 1965 Onwards
A three axle lorry with a 230 hp V8 motor. It had a foldaway cowling to ease maintenance.



Cost: $259 K
Capacity: 16
Cargo type: (anything, except for passengers)
Top speed: 80 km/h
Weight: 6.0 t
Power: 223 kW
Tractive effort: 10 kN
Running costs: $43.2 K/year
Lifespan: 35 years
Loading speed: 4.0x

40 Tons truck | From 1990 Onwards
A six axle semi-trailer truck, equipped with a V8 turbo diesel engine of 456 kW power.



Cost: $409 K
Capacity: 20
Cargo type: (anything, except for passengers)
Top speed: 100 km/h
Weight: 10 t
Power: 456 kW
Tractive effort: 60 kN
Running costs: $68.2 K/year
Lifespan: 35 years
Loading speed: .0x
Planes
Junkers F 13 | From 1920 To 1950
The Junkers F 13 was the world's first all-metal transport aircraft, developed in Germany at the end of World War I.





Cost: $179 K
Capacity: 3
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 140 km/h
Weight: 1.0 t
Thrust: 3.5 kN
Running costs: $29.8 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 1.0x

Dornier Merkur | From 1925 To 1960
The Dornier Merkur was a German passenger aircraft, built in the Dornier factories in Friedrichshafen.





Cost: $349 K
Capacity: 5
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 175 km/h
Weight: 2.3 t
Thrust: 8.0 kN
Running costs: $58.1 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 1.0x

Douglas DC-3 | From 1935 To 1970
The Douglas DC-3 is a fixed-wing propeller-driven airliner. Its cruise speed and range revolutionized air transport in the 1930s and 1940s.





Cost: $963 K
Capacity: 8
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 333 km/h
Weight: 7.7 t
Thrust: 25 kN
Running costs: $160 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Loading speed: 2.0x

Douglas DC-4 | From 1944 To 1975
The Douglas DC-4 is a four-engine (piston) propeller-driven airliner developed by the Douglas Aircraft Company. From 1945, many civil airlines operated it worldwide.





Cost: $1.97 M
Capacity: 15
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 365 km/h
Weight: 20 t
Thrust: 70 kN
Running costs: $329 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Loading speed: 2.0x

Lockheed Super Constellation | From 1952 To 1986
The Lockheed L-1049 Super Constellation is an American aircraft, a member of the Lockheed Constellation aircraft line.





Cost: $4.05 M
Capacity: 23
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 489 km/h
Weight: 31 t
Thrust: 150 kN
Running costs: $675 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 4.0x

De Havilland Comet 4B | From 1960 To 1990
Originally developed for Capital Airlines as the 4A, the 4B featured greater capacity through a 2m longer fuselage, and a shorter wingspan.





Cost: $5.62 M
Capacity: 21
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 725 km/h
Weight: 33 t
Thrust: 188 kN
Running costs: $937 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Loading speed: 4.0x

Boeing 737 | From 1968 To 2000
The Boeing 737 is an American short- to medium-range twinjet narrow-body airliner.





Cost: $6.09 M
Capacity: 21
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 780 km/h
Weight: 28 t
Thrust: 128 kN
Running costs: $1.01 M/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 6.0x

Concorde | From 1976 Onwards
The Concorde is a British-French turbojet-powered supersonic passenger jet airliner that was operated until 2003.





Cost: $20.0 M
Capacity: 24
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 2,158 km/h
Weight: 79 t
Thrust: 560 kN
Running costs: $3.34 M/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 4.0x

Boeing 757 | From 1984 Onwards
The Boeing 757 is the manufacturer's largest single-aisle passenger aircraft and was produced from 1981 to 2004.





Cost: $18.5 M
Capacity: 55
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 895 km/h
Weight: 58 t
Thrust: 360 kN
Running costs: $3.09 M/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 10.0x

Airbus A320 | From 1992 Onwards
Technically, the name A320 only refers to the original mid-sized aircraft, but it is often informally used to indicate any of the A318/A319/A320/A321 family.





Cost: $11.8 M
Capacity: 38
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 828 km/h
Weight: 44 t
Thrust: 236 kN
Running costs: $1.96 M/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 7.0x
Ships
Rigi | From 1850 To 1930
The parts of the Rigi were built in England and assembled in Luzern. Due to the lack of coal in Switzerland at the time, the Rigi was powered by wood.






Cost: $216 K
Capacity: 50
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 22 km/h
Weight: 67 t
Power: 80 kW
Running costs: $36.1 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 20.0x

Wilhelm I | From 1850 To 1910
The Wilhelm was built with the support of King Wilhelm I. of Wurttemberg and was officially the first steamer on the Lake Constance.






Cost: $187 K
Capacity: 50
Cargo type: (anything, except for passengers)
Top speed: 20 km/h
Weight: 149 t
Power: 85 kW
Running costs: $31.2 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 20.0x

Zoroaster | From 1860 To 1910
Many consider the Zoroaster to be the first successful oil tanker. Unlike later models, it was built small enough to sail canals and also the Volga River.






Cost: $225 K
Capacity: 60
Cargo type: Crude oil, Oil, Fuel
Top speed: 20 km/h
Weight: 350 t
Power: 200 kW
Running costs: $37.5 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 20.0x

Frontenac | From 1885 To 1940
The Frontenac was built for 50'000 dollars in New York and was in service on the Cayuga Lake for several decades.






Cost: $417 K
Capacity: 75
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 26 km/h
Weight: 206 t
Power: 180 kW
Running costs: $69.5 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 30.0x

Klondike | From 1898 To 1960
The Klondike had the distinction of a much higher capacity than regular sternwheelers, despite its shallow draft.






Cost: $472 K
Capacity: 100
Cargo type: (anything, except for passengers)
Top speed: 23 km/h
Weight: 600 t
Power: 391 kW
Running costs: $78.6 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 40.0x

Vandal | From 1900 To 1960
The Vandal is one of the first ships built with a Diesel engine and an electrical transmission.



Cost: $786 K
Capacity: 150
Cargo type: Crude oil, Oil, Fuel
Top speed: 25 km/h
Weight: 700 t
Power: 500 kW
Running costs: $131 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 60.0x

Schaffhausen | From 1913 To 1985
The Schaffhausen - a flush-deck vessel - was the last paddle-steamer operated by the Schweizer Dampfboot AG.






Cost: $588 K
Capacity: 100
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 27 km/h
Weight: 135 t
Power: 294 kW
Running costs: $98.0 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 40.0x

Zurich | From 1935 Onwards
The more than 80 year old Zurich has its home port in Romanshorn. It is still in use for public transportation on the Lake Constance.






Cost: $671 K
Capacity: 125
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 25 km/h
Weight: 235 t
Power: 441 kW
Running costs: $112 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 50.0x

Viola | From 1950 Onwards
The Viola was built in Temse and was mainly used to haul fuel on the Rhine river.



Cost: $1.72 M
Capacity: 250
Cargo type: Crude oil, Oil, Fuel
Top speed: 30 km/h
Weight: 1,100 t
Power: 1,000 kW
Running costs: $287 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 100.0x

Axalp | From 1950 Onwards
The Axalp was designed by the famous Swiss naval architect Adolf J. Rynike. After commissioning it was upgraded several times.





Cost: $1.03 M
Capacity: 150
Cargo type: (anything, except for passengers)
Top speed: 30 km/h
Weight: 800 t
Power: 662 kW
Running costs: $172 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 60.0x

HC SR.N6 | From 1970 Onwards
The SR.N6 is a larger version of the SR.N5 series and became the most produced and successful hovercraft design in the world.






Cost: $564 K
Capacity: 15
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 93 km/h
Weight: 10 t
Power: 780 kW
Running costs: $94.0 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Loading speed: 5.0x

Graf Zeppelin | From 1980 Onwards
The individual parts of Graf Zeppelin were built in Linz, and the ship was finally put together in Fussach.






Cost: $950 K
Capacity: 175
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 26 km/h
Weight: 360 t
Power: 678 kW
Running costs: $158 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 75.0x

Merlin | From 1990 Onwards
The motor cargo vessel Merlin is a modern river cargo ship which travels on the Donau.




Cost: $2.26 M
Capacity: 250
Cargo type: (anything, except for passengers)
Top speed: 36 km/h
Weight: 1,400 t
Power: 1,400 kW
Running costs: $377/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 100.0x
< >
38 Comments
Froinchi Sep 19, 2018 @ 8:20am 
thanks lots
The_Joker_91 Jan 3, 2018 @ 1:45am 
@Havan_IronOak: Its kph not mph => I assume your unit is mph > it would fit then. For me it is 25kph in Transport Fever ;)
Havan_IronOak Dec 31, 2017 @ 10:00am 
The DMG Cannstatt | From 1890 To 1946 has a top speed of 16 in Transport Fever. I'm guessing that this shows a value from Train Fever.
Stormmaster Nov 20, 2017 @ 11:45pm 
Great!
no asbestos for you  [author] Nov 20, 2017 @ 5:15pm 
@Stormmaster Cheers :) I've added these to the guide, as well as a bunch of mistake corrections.
Stormmaster Nov 20, 2017 @ 10:30am 
Locomotives:
D 1/3 = 6.4 m
Borsig = 12 m
Prussian G3 = 15 m
Prussian T3 = 8.6 m
PLM 220 = 16 m
A 3/5 = 19 m
Baden = 12 m
Ce 6/8 II Crocodile = 21 m
Flying Scotsman = 20 m
A 4/7 = 17 m
A4 Mallard = 21 m
Class E94 = 19m
Re 4/4 = 15 m
NoHAB AA16 = 20 m
Class V 100 = 14 m
Class 1042 = 16 m
Class 103 = 20 m
Class 218 = 17 m
Class 185 = 20 m
Class 246 = 19 m

Multiple Units:
Cle 2/4 Red Arrow = 25 m; Railbus = 14 m; RABDe Mirage = 75 m;
TGV = 130 m / 207 m / 283 m; Re 450 commuter train = 99 m

Passenger:
D 1/3 = 6.4 m
Bavarian = 8.5 m
Compartment = 12 m
Three-axle = 12 m
Donnerbruchse = 13 m
BC4 = 20 m
Einheitswagen II = 24 m
Einheitswagen IV = 27 m
Double-deck car = 27 m

Cargo:
Open wagon = 6.7 m / 10 m / 14 m
Tank wagon = 6.7 m / 8.3 m / 15 m
Goods wagon = 7.5 m / 10 m / 16 m
Stake car = 7 m / 11 m / 18 m
Stormmaster Nov 19, 2017 @ 8:18am 
This guide (and the US one) is so awesome, I am using these all the time when I play! Having locomotive and wagon length would be really helpful. I actually started taking notes (from what depot shows when you have a unit in it by itself).

D 1/3 = 6.4 m; Borsig = 12 m; Prussian G3 = 15 m; Prussian T3 = 8.6 m; PLM = 16 m; A 3/5 = 19 m; Baden = 12 m; Ce 6/8 II Crocodile = 21 m; Flying Scotsman = 20 m; A 4/7 = 17 m; A4 Mallard = 21 m; Class E94 = 19m; Re 4/4 = 15 m; Red Arrow = 25 m; Railbus = 14 m

Passenger: D 1/3 = 6.4 m; Bavarian = 8.5 m; Compartment = 12 m; Three-axle = 12 m; Donnerbruchse = 13 m; BC4 = 20 m

Cargo: Open wagon = 6.7 m / 10 m / na; Tank wagon = 6.7 m / 8.3 m / 15 m; Goods wagon = 7.5 m / 10 m / na; Stake car = 7 m / 11 m / 18 m
Dionysusnu Aug 13, 2017 @ 7:20am 
Edinburgh instead of Edinbrgh
Dionysusnu Aug 10, 2017 @ 5:27am 
Class A3 Flying Scottsman | From 1925 To 1975
The Flying Scottsman is an express passenger train that has operated between Edinbrgh and London, the capitals of Scotland and England, via the East Coast Main Line.




Cost: $4.16 M
Top speed: 120 km/h
Weight: 98 t
Power: 1,655 kW
Tractive effort: 135 kN
Running costs: $693 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
AlwaysRM Jul 31, 2017 @ 4:09pm 
The Zoroaster is 1850 and the Wilhelm I can'r carry Fuel, Crude oil and Oil,
I guess there udated the game.