Tabletop Simulator

Tabletop Simulator

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Cards Against Education Ethics - UConn Two Summers
   
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Game Category: Card Games, Original Games
Number of Players: 2, 3, 4
Tags: 4+
File Size
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0.102 MB
May 10, 2020 @ 7:49am
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Cards Against Education Ethics - UConn Two Summers

Description
Cards Against Education Ethics (CAEE) is an instructional ethics card game built using mechanics drawn from the popular party game Cards Against Humanity (2011). The cards were collaboratively developed by faculty and graduate students in the University of Connecticut Educational Technology program in service of providing a novel, personalized approach to ethics training situated in a rich agent-environment interaction context.

A full album of Cards Against Education Ethics cards is available here: https://imgur.com/a/k5opA

In CAEE, play is measured in rounds. At the start of each round, one player reads a blue sentence card drawn face-down from the top of the deck. After hearing the sentence (with a vocabulary blank in it), other players each contribute one white word card that they believe best completes the blue sentence card. “Best,” of course, is subjective—there is no way to quantify an abstract “highest value” for every possible card combination, which forces players to consider the card content, the social context, literal use of the sentences/words, figurative use of the sentences/words, and the real world ethical consequences of the implied sentence (e.g., “The school’s alumni can attest that, historically speaking, we’ve never had an issue with [our controversial school mascot]“). And that’s part of what makes the game instructionally-useful: it positions players to communicate about their personal relationships with the particular ethical challenges presented through gameplay.

Players should be encouraged to reflect on the sentences they create, share them with their classmates, discuss how they would approach some of the unique problems they encounter, and compare situations from gameplay with real world education and engineering ethics cases.

Some blue sentence cards are denoted as BASED ON A TRUE STORY. Sentences on these cards were created using real world ethics cases involving schools, teachers, administrators, students, and others involved with and surrounding the field of education. A full list of these cards and their corresponding cases can be found on the program website: https://edtech.education.uconn.edu