108
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808
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Recent reviews by WHAM

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Showing 1-10 of 108 entries
No one has rated this review as helpful yet
6.6 hrs on record
"Oh, it's just a glorified hidden object game?"

The Eyes of Ara is a game I came across on a list of recommended puzzle games that might remind one of the classics like Myst, Riven, The Witness and Quern. Perhaps that led me to starting the game off on the wrong foot?

Whatever the case, the game puts you in the boots of some sort of signal technician on a boat to an improbable castle on an island from which a mysterious signal is emanating. Your job is to find the signal source and make it go away. The old coot who lived here disappeared years ago and apparently local kids sometimes dare each other to enter, so the place should be calm and quiet and covered in cobwebs. But you are not quite alone, as the eponymous Eyes of Ara are always watching...

Early on the game reveals its cards, however. While there are puzzles to solve, the majority content of the game is an item hunt. More specifically: the Eyes of Ara is, first and foremost, a hidden object game. Not only do a large number of puzzles revolve around the idea of "find X hidden objects in this room to proceed", it blatantly reuses the same puzzles several times, sometimes even in the same room. The map design is often nonsensical, using a table with several feet of clear space around it as an impassable obstacle requiring you to find hidden passages to get around it, or making an optional puzzle highly prominent and hiding its solution across multiple maps, only to reward the player with a few meaningless collectibles and zero actual game progress.

Where I quit was a particular variation of a slide puzzle, aligning pieces of an image while constantly bombarded by ear-grating noises. Some of the late game puzzles had already sent me to a walkthrough for I was not intelligent enough to fathom some of the more obscure clues, nor find several of the hidden-in-plain-sight objects that are absolutely required to beat the game.

The game reuses much more than just puzzles. You will see the same 3D assets over and over. The same photographs, chairs, clocks, books. The same puzzle elements and symbols. While there are a solid amount of nice and unique objects in the game, it all feels stretched out, like the developers had very few ideas and fewer objects, but had to copy them around to make the game long enough to qualify for some minimum length criteria.

There is a story here as well, but it's told through notes people wrote on paper many years ago and left for you to find. A story of interstellar wonders, family matters and the endless curiosity of adult and child alike. It's not badly written, but it doesn't feel very important, either. Much of the text can safely be ignored and the few clues needed to progress are fairly obvious. Well, most of them.

If you are a fan of hidden object games and puzzles, and don't mind repetition, you might still find that you like the Eyes of Ara. As for me, I cannot recommend it.

Playtime: 7+ hours (Partial playthrough, game not finished)

Ratings (1-10)
Visual: 6
Audio: 6
Story: 4
Gameplay: 3
Overall: 4
Posted September 2.
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3 people found this review helpful
13.1 hrs on record
"Aww yiss, knucklebones!"

I saw an old trailer for Cult of the Lamb and was immediately fixated on the curious combination of cutesy art style and dark occult subject matter. I expected a management sim where you build up your cult, manage resources, affiliations and more.

What I wasn't prepared for was the hack-and-slash gameplay that felt like bargain bin Binding of Isaac!

So, safe to say, I didn't know what I was getting into with Cult of the Lamb.

You are the lamb, the last of your kind, and about to be sacrificed to ensure a sealed-away entity cannot return to the mortal realm. You escape, however, and begin raising a cult from which to draw power from so you can defeat the bishops who stand in your way, all in service of a dark, bound force that bides its time and awaits for you to release it.

The game is split roughly in half between a passable exploration and combat game where you take on randomly generated maps, fight enemies and collect temporary upgrades, and a cult management sim where you recruit followers and order them to work or worship, generating resources with which you can build up your little cult village of cute animal people.

As the game starts it feels fun and quirky and full of energy and potential! The first occult rituals in which you and your adorable animal followers cheer and chant as blood-red runes throb and stir is a promise of something truly unique ahead. However, in trying to be two games at once, Cult of the Lamb falls flat with both of its halves, and what might have been a march to success turns into a stumbling trot to mediocrity. The combat quickly begins to feel samey and the unpredictable nature of equipment you are provided can make some runs feel tedious and annoying while providing very little in way of rewards. Likewise, the cult management quikcly starts to feel like repetitive busywork. Upgrades somehow feel like they unlock both too slowly, but also too fast, since you can unlock everything worthwhile quite early in the game, leaving you with just minor incremental gains that don't feel worthwhile. The cultists themselves, adorable, colourful and embedded with special character traits, turn out to be very simplistic cardboard cutouts that generate side-quests for the player to deal with, many of which revolve around juvenile humour about eating poop which feels out of place. Like a joke a developed came up with early on and refused to give up no matter how inappropriate it ended up being to the final themes of the game.

Where Cult of the Lamb truly shines is its audiovisual aspects. The quirky music combining vocals and ambient instruments, the wonderfully creative 'voice acting' of some characters, the colourful and cheerful character art and all the gorgeous little animations that really bring to life the variety of characters, especially our protagonist the Lamb. It all just tickles the brain in all the right ways! Time and time again I found myself smiling and bobbing my head to the tunes.

Sadly the audiovisual glory cannot uplift the mediocre gameplay enough for me to really recommend the game. The first few hours I was hooked. Around the 6 hour mark I felt I'd seen all there was to see, and when I finished the game after about 13 hours I was sad to admit I had been right. On top of the underlying issues with the games flow and design, I suffered of a number of bugs that caused the game to get stuck as events did not load or menus did not open, forcing me to return to the main menu or to start the game again. The Twitch integration felt especially broken, and I disabled that around the halfway point of the game.

A special mention has to go to the little dice-based minigame of knucklebones, which was far more entertaining than it has any right to be, and the keepers of the lighthouse and their hilarious chanting I couldn't help but mimic whenever I visited them.

In conclusion, Cult of the Lamb is a wonderfully creative idea that had potential to be two great games, but it ends up stumbling and never reaches the greatness it deserves.

Playtime: 13+ hours (Single playthrough)

Ratings (1-10)
Visual: 9
Audio: 9
Story: 6
Gameplay: 4
Overall: 6
Posted August 28.
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No one has rated this review as helpful yet
27.2 hrs on record (21.1 hrs at review time)
"The best virtual job I've ever held!"

This is a game about you taking a laser cutter and a gravity gun, then cutting up a spaceship in zero gravity and tossing the pieces into various receptacles to process them and make money off of them. You get to cut away hull panels, occasionally explode fuel lines by accident, risk reactor meltdowns and even explosively decompress entire ships if you're not careful!

If all of that doesn't sound awesome and fun to you, you might need to see a doctor or something. For me it was one of the most entertaining things I've played in a long time.

Seeing how the different ships are structured, figuring out how their hulls come apart in nice, clean chunks and how to most effectively and quickly disassemble the juiciest and most valuable parts is a great little puzzle unto itself. Atop it all the visuals are very nice, with all sorts of cool details to discover, and there's even some clever worldbuilding going on to establish a story and setting.

Sadly I found the weakest part of the game to be its story. I feel the tale of downtrodden workers being forced to work and exploited rang kind of hollow to me simply due to how much I freakin' loved starting a shift and getting to work again! The individual characters, and especially the voice actors, are excellent, though. While you never get to see these distant colleagues in person, you get to know a bit about their history and life.

Along with the excellent voice cast, the rest of the games audio is pristinely done as well. From the twangly country music that embodies hard but chill work to the various sounds you hear in your suit, whether it be the eerie hum of pressurized spaceship interiors or the rattle of metallic microfragments raining on your visor as you cut through a support beam.

I'm definitely keeping this game as one of my relaxing games to pass the time with, and if there is ever expansions or sequels for it, I'll be happy to take the plunge!

An easy recommendation from me.


Playtime: 20+ hours (Single playthrough)

Ratings (1-10)
Visual: 9
Audio: 9
Story: 7
Gameplay: 10
Overall: 9
Posted July 6.
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1 person found this review helpful
9.5 hrs on record
"Wait, have we been here before, or, like... forever?"

This is a game I was looking forward to for a long time. The hype was real and I worried the game might not quite live up to it. However, I was wrong! We Were Here Forever completely lives up to the hype and is absolutely worth its full asking price!

That is, if you have a friend. Just one friend, that's all you really need. Keep that in mind.

Like the previous games in the series, We Were Here Forever places two players in the boots of arctic explorers trapped in a mysterious castle, taunted by a wicked jester and wondering what dark tale might have revolved around the mad king and his ruined, snowbound realm.

Communication is key, as the game requires players to talk, relay information and guide one another through the various puzzles and challenges the game presents. I won't say much on the puzzles, other than that there is a wide variety of them. Any player will probably like some more than others, and I can think of one puzzle I particularly disliked myself. However, no puzzle overstays its welcome too badly, and thus has no chance to sour the experience, as the next puzzle then takes over and the players get to move on to new adventures.

Communication is also made a little more challenging and thoughtful by the radios used in the game, as when one player is transmitting, they cannot hear the other, and if both players transmit at the same time, they block each other out and cannot communicate at all! Now, sure, you could work around this by using voice comms outside of the game, but I'd recommend against such a workaround, as it will remove a key element of tension and challenge from the game.

The game has evolved from its predecessors in pretty much all areas. The tech, the visuals, the sound and music are all improved with each iteration. The odd accents (Dutch, I think, maybe?) of the voice actors might throw you off, but this is easily justified by the story and locale of the game. In some places, mostly around are transitions, even my beefy gaming PC started to experience some slowdown, but this also remained brief and never took place in areas where time or precision was of the essence.

A key note I can't help but reiterate, though: this game is good, but it can only be as good as the connection you have with your co-player. There is an option to play with random strangers, but personally this does not feel like a good method for playing a game such as this. Find a friend, grab a radio and get puzzling!

Playtime: 8+ hours (Single playthrough)

Ratings (1-10)
Visual: 8
Audio: 7
Story: 8
Gameplay: 9
Overall: 9
Posted June 18.
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No one has rated this review as helpful yet
15.4 hrs on record
"And the award for the most interesting gameplay mechanic of the year goes to: THIS FOX!"

I read about Tunic in a Penny Arcade webcomic strip, and after a single look at the store page I made the purchase on a whim. Upon starting the game I had some concern that the game was just another cheap Zelda clone and that would be that. Ten minutes later I began to see what Tunic was truly going for, and after a few hours I knew I had a potential Game of the Year on my hands.

Tunic is, for the most part, a fairly straightforward isometric adventure game. You navigate a cute fox and fight angry bad guys and monsters that try to stop you. The game is rendered in soft, but vivid colour and style that serves well to both keep the player informed of all the important things there are to see, while doing just enough to hide and obscure the countless secrets embedded in the world. Sound effects provide little to talk about, serving their purpose well without being disruptive, and the music provides a pleasing ambience where appropriate, and a bit of action and thrill when called for.

The game draws inspiration not only from games such as Zelda and The Witness, with the former providing general gameplay and the latter inspiring some puzzles, but also from some of the basics of Dark Souls, with how combat revolves around positioning, blocking and dodging. Even things like the Dark Souls bonfire and collecting a recovery after death, though Tunic is far more forgiving and kind with its mechanics.

A vague task to ring two bells and free a trapped figure are all you have to go on, but here is where Tunic sets itself apart: the game gives much of its story, exposition and instructions through its manual. But the manual is not some crummy readme.txt file or a PDF document, but rather an interactive and collectible element of the game itself! While it's written in a seemingly indecipherable language, there is just enough to go on here, and the little hints and clues embedded in this intricately crafted and beautifully illustrated document serve to feed one's imagination, curiosity and sense of adventure. This manual is perhaps the most interesting mechanic I've seen in a long time!

I could say plenty more of this game, but doing so would risk spoiling too much of the experience.

Without the slightest hesitation: I heartily recommend Tunic! It's a wonderful little adventure, and provides plenty of depth even for the completionist player looking to discover all of its secrets.

Playtime: 15+ hours (Single playthrough)

Ratings (1-10)
Visual: 9
Audio: 8
Story: 9
Gameplay: 9
Overall: 9
Posted April 10.
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2 people found this review helpful
3 people found this review funny
2
117.9 hrs on record (116.7 hrs at review time)
"I wrote a longer review, but Steam said it was too long"

As a long time fan of the Dark Souls franchise, the idea of a large open world game drawing from the themes and mechanics of that series sounded tempting to me, but also concerning, seeing how the open world game is such a standardized thing nowadays. Yet I dared hope that FROM would do something new and interesting, rather than follow the pack.

Instead I found Dark Souls 3 with a bit of polish to its combat mechanics, slapped into a medium sized open world filled to the brim with copied and pasted assets, enemies and even bosses. Every fort is made of the same basic assets. Every castle and village is made up of the same set of assets. Every mine is the same and catacomb uses the same tiles and ends in the same final room.

Most of the audio and visuals are very much just Dark Souls 3, with effects and fidelity that feel no different now than they did in 2016, so there isn't very much for me to talk about. Some of the visual effects don't quite work when the player has more speed and freedom of movement, which speaks to a loose world design.

There is one new thing in Elden Ring: the open world. A seemingly vast map full of nooks and crannies and varied regions to explore, with massive structures as unique locations to explore and convey story to us. The open world functions very much like any online RPG's open world. Mob enemies roam or sit in place waiting for the player to approach. Navigation is simplistic and distance is made trivial by the players steed and copious amounts of fast travel points. In my first hours I kept going "Ooh, wow! That's a cool thing!", but after a few dozen hours I instead went "Oh? Again? I've seen that thing five times now, why is there another copy of it here!?" After 90 hours I wanted to never see any of it again.

My biggest grievance is the lack of rewards for your effort. Elden Ring's way of rewarding the player for exploring is usually a fight with a tougher-than-usual enemy, and an item. However, there is no way to know what items you're going to get, and in most cases I felt punished for exploration rather than rewarded. You see, much like the older games in the series, you can upgrade yourself by expending specific items. Most rewards are items or ashes, things you need to upgrade. But since this is an open world game now, the way to get more of those itemsis to venture into specific kinds of mini-dungeons over and over again to get the items you need. Thus, your reward is actually an excuse to send you back to old areas, grind through them time and time again so you can collect more of the same resources. Or, as I ended up doing: don't. Pick one thing early on and stick with it, at which point nearly all of the rewards the game gives you are meaningless junk.

Another new mechanic is the time of day, with night and day flowing by as you adventure. In theory it could cause interesting changes in the open world, but much like the crafting and resource collection mechanics, this also felt tacked on and pointless. Nothing special happens during the day, so I found that it was best to just always do everything at night. If I encountered something too dangerous, I'd just ride away and ignore it.

So, the new mechanics of Elden Ring seem to end up creating just Dark Souls 3, but with a bigger map and a lot of ways to waste time. If all you wanted, though, was Dark Souls 3 with a few new bits and a bigger map, then Elden Ring is definitely for you!

Let's take a step back, though. What is an Elden Ring? What is the story here, and who are all the characters? What is out goal and motivation?

Beats me! After over a hundred hours I still have no answers to any of those questions, despite trying to dig up as much lore from character dialogue and item descriptions as I could. I don't know what makes a Tarnished, or what the Elden Ring is, or why I'd want to become an Elden Lord? Maybe I'd get free ice cream every tuesday?

The story of the game is nowhere to be found most of the time, and due to the vast time expenditure in exploring the game between bits of story, it's difficult to remember who is who and why things are happening.

Not finding things is a very real issue in Elden Ring, at least for me. A staple of FROM software games has always been a kind of cheekiness in hiding and obscuring certain things, giving curious players hints and nudges while holding back some information. Entire optional areas might be hidden and secret, which was a bold move from a developer! In Elden Ring, however, I feel things have gone too far. For me, learning that it was perfectly possible to miss entire characters, shopkeepers, storylines and important items initially resulted in paranoia that I'd missed something, but soon turned to exhaustion: there was just too much ground to cover, and too many enemies to deal with. And so I began to dash ahead, grabbing what items I could easily take and activating fast travel points while avoiding many of the fights the game placed before me. I'd keep going, and think I'd come back later to explore in more detail.

As mentioned earlier, however, that exploration rewards the player only with more ways to waste time, along with fights that might have become trivially easy by the time you remember to return to them. Perhaps that fight would have been fun and cool earlier on, but you missed it? Or forgot? Or it was a gruelling, repetitive slog and you should be grateful for having bypassed it and the meager reward it provided?

The only way to find out is to play again, and again, and again, in the hopes of finding the optimal experience. Or to go online and read a progression guide, but at that point why bother? If the game can't be bothered to provide a coherent experience, why should the player bother to waste their time with the game?

As a final anecdote I have to mention the online features of the game, which return as-is from past FROM sofware games. Due to the high popularity of the game, and the outright venomous nature of the community, nearly every puzzle and secret of the game is readily spoiled by the online messaging mechanic. In my game this led to an unintended and unwanted story event that very much fouled my mood toward the game.

My recommendation here is, if you'll play and want to experience the puzzles and challenges and mysteries unspoiled: play in the offline mode.

In the end, nothing about Elden Ring stood out to me. I can still remember names of locations and people from Dark Souls 1, 2 and 3, but I struggle to recall almost anything about Elden Ring despite having dedicated all of my free time for it over the past three weeks. All I can remember is the frustrations, annoyances and all the hours wasted.

Playtime: 115+ hours (Single playthrough)

Ratings (1-10)
Visual: 7
Audio: 6
Story: 2
Gameplay: 6
Overall: 5
Posted March 27. Last edited March 27.
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6 people found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
0.5 hrs on record
Early Access Review
Never became the game it meant to become, and seems very much like it will never be finished either. In case anyone still looks to purhcase this, do so only if you're fine with the idea of perpetual Early Access.

9 years of development hell is not a pretty sight.
Posted December 14, 2021.
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1 person found this review helpful
12.5 hrs on record
"A stoat is fine, too!"

I never really got into most multiplayer card games, like Hearthstone or Magic the Gathering, since those games always felt like you had to pay to have a chance at winning. However, in a story focused single player game, many of the mechanics that can feel frustrating when playing against an unknowable human opponent, can feel like puzzles and rewarding challenges. Put together what seemed like a cool card game and a horror-oriented cabin-in-the-woods mystery and Inscryption seemed like a pretty darn interesting game to me!

And for what I expected, Inscryption delivered, and then delivered some more!

While some aspects of the game, such as certain card mechanics, traversal modes and especially music can sometimes feel lacking, the whole of Inscryption was a really impressive game and I enjoyed all of it!

So what's the game about? You are, well, you. And you are trapped in a cabin with a shady person who wants to play cards with you. And unless you play well, you will die and get turned into a card yourself. Throughout the game you unlock new cards and abilities, explore the cabin around you and play on, getting better at the game and pushing further into the mystery. The game then opens up in some surprising ways that I won't be spoiling here. Suffice to say I was impressed and surprised with the later stages of the game and how they expanded on the core ideas!

However, for some people the core game loop of a card game can also feel frustrating or unfair. There is a good bit of luck-of-the-draw involved, which can cause progress made later to feel less valuable as it feels unclear if you got better or just had a good luck that time. However, this is a bit of an unavoidable issue with deck-building card games, so I won't consider that a sin here.

The way the story of the game is delivered also surprised me, but that's more spoilers, so sadly I can't really say a lot more of that, either.

While this review might seem flat or lacking due to me not wanting to spoil too much, I will say that the game is well worth experiencing and that the experience will definitely be better if you go in unspoiled! Give it a go, you won't regret it! Inscryption is easily one of my top 3 games of 2021!

Playtime: 12+ hours (Single playthrough)

Ratings (1-10)
Visual: 8
Audio: 7
Story: 9
Gameplay: 8
Overall: 9
Posted November 26, 2021.
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10 people found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
3.9 hrs on record (3.8 hrs at review time)
"Wait... was that it!? ARE YOU SERIOUS!?"

Chasing Static was not what I expected. It wasn't a horror game, or a game about tracking mysterious signals to discover grand secrets, nor was it a game with an intriguing story. Maybe coming out just before Halloween, or the trailers I saw, had coloured my expectations? Instead it turned out to be a first person version of a 90's point and click adventure game with some puzzles lifted right out of the deeper pits of moonlogic of that era, and it's all wrapped up in one of the least satisfying story endings I have experienced in a long time.

So what got me into this game? I saw a trailer and liked the mood, and I especially liked the visuals. While flawed in some areas due to seemingly mismatched textures and Unity physics wonkiness, the game looks wonderful. It hits just the kind of 90's nostalgia, landing in a comfortable valley between the Play Station and PS2 eras of visuals, with a few modern tweaks. It was the visuals that sold the game to me, sold the mood and atmosphere, and made me want to play.

Three hours later, however, and I feel disappointed.

Chasing Static tells the story of Chris, a cigarette smoking englishman with a love-hate relationship with his car and a troubled family history. He finds himself tracking down a town from his past, only to get lost and off track, and eventually trapped in a nightmarish scenario filled with horrors, intrigue and death. The game introduces us to characters and plotlines and locations that all seem to hint at some greater revelation at the end, at some grand reveal that brings all of these mysteries together.

That ending, however; the one I came to expect based on what I was seeing build up over time, is not to be found. Without giving away too much, and because I cannot be bothered to put up a spoiler tag: the ending seems to reveal that nothing was real. It was all a dream or a vision or an experiment. None of it really mattered, and the game even hints at that being the case in some of its dialogue and gameplay design.

I was left with so many questions, and not a single satisfying answer to go with those questions.

This is the part where I'd normally cover sound and music, but for me the game came accompanied with what I can only think of as bugs and missing sound effects. Many cutscenes played dialogue just fine, but contained no sound effects at all. Other times even the dialogue wouldn't play, and in-game events would glitch out due to overlapping events and scenes. Oh, and it rains indoors sometimes. There is a solid effort to build up atmosphere, but some effects feel so overused over the games relatively short runtime, and provide so little payoff, that it comes off as trying a little bit too hard.

As much as I wanted to like this game, I cannot bring myself to recommend it. It feels unfinished, untested and unpolished, and the story the game is built upon feels so half-hearted that all I felt after finishing the game was deep disappointment. However, I have to admit the small developer team has heart and passion, so...

If you see this game on a discount, and there have been some bug fixes and polish in later patches, then you might consider it, even if it's just to support and motivate the developers. At its full retail price, and at least at the time of writing this review, soon after launch: don't bother.

Playtime: 3+ hours (Single playthrough)

Ratings (1-10)
Visual: 7
Audio: 6
Story: 3
Gameplay: 5
Overall: 4
Posted October 14, 2021. Last edited October 15, 2021.
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4 people found this review helpful
2.9 hrs on record
"This lady sounds NUTS!"

NUTS is an unusual game, and that made me like it. You are tasked with researching squirrels, and to perform this task you must set up cameras in the forest, let them record animal movements overnight, and then review the footage you got in the morning. Maybe you pointed the camera the wrong way and got nothing, maybe you got precisely what you needed, or maybe you need to go back, readjust and try again the next night to learn something new. It's a very neat concept and not one I've seen done with this much freedom for the player!

The sounds of the forest, and the minimalist ambient music, also work well to build up an atmosphere. There is a great sensation of potential during the early moments of the game, of something greater eventually coming our way. Even the plot, focused around your research being used to prevent some greedy corporation from ruining the forest by damming the river, seems to hint toward something more mysterious and nefarious.

It is here, however, that the game lets the player down a little. A lot of the potential of this setting, and the gameplay mechanics, are never fully realised. It is my understanding the game was developed with limited time and resources, and the developers have done some great things, but as much as I like the idea of NUTS, I was left wanting something more.

There is also the minor gripe I have with the only voice actor of the game. Her voice and accent are fine for her role, but her delivery leaves much to be wanted, with some lines delivered with too much haste, not flowing naturally. I think you can tell the actor isn't a native english speaker, and this might have made it difficult for her to feel natural when doing her lines.

Finally I must also warn the reader of the colour scheme of NUTS. While I found it endearing in the way it uses limited colours and contrast to paint its world, several people I showed the game to complained that it was unpleasant to look at. I feel this will come down to personal taste and preference, so do take a good look at the screenshots in the store page before you take the plunge.

Still, even for a short game with a lot of potential left untapped, I have to recommend NUTS. It's not an action packed experience, nor will it envelop you in a grand story full of twists and turns, but if you'd like to spend an evening doing something no other game lets you do, toying around with mechanics no other game offers, NUTS is a good investment.

Playtime: 3+ hours (Single playthrough)

Ratings (1-10)
Visual: 7
Audio: 8
Story: 5
Gameplay: 8
Overall: 7
Posted September 5, 2021.
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