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Tenwall  [developer] Apr 22, 2014 @ 10:56pm
The Place of "Story" in Video Games?
  • Where do you guys think story fits into game design?
  • Does the story fit around the design?
  • Does the design fit around the story?
  • Is it important?
Showing 1-3 of 3 comments
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C0untzer0 Apr 23, 2014 @ 12:31am 
I find that the two tend to grow together. I've always been of the "old school" of development where the idea was that the player was helping to tell a story through his choices and actions.
Tenwall  [developer] Apr 23, 2014 @ 12:50am 
I've found that sort of branching story-telling can be very powerful but has to be done "just right". Examples I can think of off the top of my head are Skyrim and GTAIII - GTAV. Of course they had the resources to make those wild sandboxes for players to craft their own stories in. On the flip-side, I think linear narratives can be just as cool, but it's a very difficult push and pull between allowing the player some semblance of choice while also ensuring they take a perscribed epic journey. Good examples of this are Bioshock: Infinite and Chrono Trigger.

How do you think a more linear approach to story in games can achieve that same thrill of "choice"? I'm curious what you think.

Thanks for the reply!
C0untzer0 Apr 23, 2014 @ 5:19am 
One can get from A to B in a variety of ways. As a very blunt example, to get from point to point the player can choose to:
  • Break a window and climb through (picking up a few cuts)
  • Pick a lock (and raise suspicions)
  • Climb a fence (and take some more time)
  • Knock (and have to persuade someone to let them through)
They all start and end in the same place, but can add a few different lines of dialogue depending on choice (e.g. "I never knew you were so [Badass / Sneaky / Athletic / Polite]")

edit: This then relies on your ability to maintain the illusion of choice and consequences, throw in a couple of hidden character variables and see how the other personalities you've made react to the accumulation of certain choices (A simple way to deal with this would be the old D+D matrix between Good and Chaotic, Lawful and Unlawful, with a reaction table modified by the values acquired by the character)
Last edited by C0untzer0; Apr 23, 2014 @ 5:26am
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