Transport Fever

Transport Fever

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Vehicle List - USA
By ohno, its asbestos
A complete list of all purchasable vehicles in the game with their stats, ordered by appearance date, based on in-game information and the original Train Fever list made by Zaubermuffin.
   
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General info
A little about this guide
In his original Train Fever list, Zaubermuffin said that he automated the guide creation using the game files, I assume he managed to get into either configs or the database. Unfortunately I could not automate that with Transport Fever, so the entire guide is written manually. (I did however manage to get all the vehicle pictures straight off game files) Please tell me if there are any mistakes and/or formatting mismatches, that would be greatly appreciated :)

The European vehicle list is available here:
http://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=796775735

To-do list / Known issues
- proofreading, checking for any mistakes, feel free to comment if you spot any :)
- multiple unit section gets messed up if viewed in a small sized window. not much i can do there unfortunately :/

Feedback and Suggestions
I'm open to all of it, the more the better :)

Special thanks to:
- BOCHENSKI (location of vehicle configs)
- Stormmaster (rolling stock lengths)
Locomotives (1850-1935)
Baldwin's Six-Wheels | From 1850 To 1896
The flexible-beam truck or six-wheels-connected engine was invented by Matthias Baldwin in 1842. His aim was to use all the locomotive's weight for traction.




Cost: $172 K
Top speed: 40 km/h
Weight: 20 t
Power: 70 kW
Tractive effort: 25 kN
Running costs: $28.7 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Length: 8.4 m

4-4-0 The General | From 1858 To 1908
This "American" type locomotive was very successful on many railroads in the US and is well known from the Buster Keaton film "The General".




Cost: $317 K
Top speed: 45 km/h
Weight: 40 t
Power: 130 kW
Tractive effort: 40 kN
Running costs: $52.9 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Length: 16 m

2-8-0 Baldwin Class 56 | From 1871 To 1922
The "Consolidation" was a standard freight locomotive and could move trains twice as heavy at half the cost of its predecessors.




Cost: $687 K
Top speed: 60 km/h
Weight: 50 t
Power: 284 kW
Tractive effort: 70 kN
Running costs: $114 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Length: 17 m

2-6-0 Mogul | From 1885 To 1935
The 2-6-0 wheel arrangement was principally used on tender locomotives. This type of locomotive was widely built in the US from the early 1860s to the 1920s.




Cost: $971 K
Top speed: 75 km/h
Weight: 122 t
Power: 400 kW
Tractive effort: 80 kN
Running costs: $162 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Length: 18 m

4-4-2 Atlantic | From 1902 To 1951
This wheel arrangement is commonly known as the Atlantic type, although it is also sometimes called a Milwaukee.




Cost: $1.73 M
Top speed: 100 km/h
Weight: 130 t
Power: 700 kW
Tractive effort: 100 kN
Running costs: $288 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Length: 22 m

2-8-2 Mikado | From 1916 To 1965
"Mikados" were the most common freight locomotives until the end of steam. More than 9'500 were used in the US.




Cost: $2.85 M
Top speed: 80 km/h
Weight: 219 t
Power: 1,173 kW
Tractive effort: 228 kN
Running costs: $476 K/year
Lifespan: 35 years
Length: 25 m

Milwaukee Road class EP-2 | From 1919 To 1979
The locomotives, commonly known as Bi-Polars, were one of the most interesting and complex designs ever developed and made up of no less than three articulated sections.




Cost: $8.27 M
Top speed: 113 km/h
Weight: 240 t
Power: 3,311 kW
Tractive effort: 516 kN
Running costs: $1.38 M/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Length: 23 m

4-12-2 Class 9000 | From 1926 To 1975
These locomotives were fairly successful, but maintenance nightmares, because of their inside third cylinder driving the cranked second driving axle between the frames.




Cost: $8.72 M
Top speed: 97 km/h
Weight: 355 t
Power: 3,542 kW
Tractive effort: 429.9 kN
Running costs: $1.45 M/year
Lifespan: 35 years
Length: 32 m

ALCO HH 600 | From 1930 To 1976
The ALCO HH series were an early series of switcher diesel-electric locomotives built by the American Locomotive Company (ALCO) of Schenectady, New York.




Cost: $1.09 M
Top speed: 80 km/h
Weight: 93 t
Power: 450 kW
Tractive effort: 265 kN
Running costs: $182 K/year
Lifespan: 35 years
Length: 14 m

4-4-2 Hiawatha | From 1935 To 1985
These high-speed, streamlined "Atlantic" type locomotives were built by ALCO to haul the Milwaukee Road's Hiawatha express passenger trains.




Cost: $7.66 M
Top speed: 160 km/h
Weight: 243 t
Power: 2,940 kW
Tractive effort: 136.5 kN
Running costs: $1.28 M/year
Lifespan: 35 years
Length: 27 m
Locomotives (1936-2010)
Class PRR GG1 | From 1936 To 1995
Sporting a beautiful streamlined design the GG1 not only looked good but it also performed exemplary reaching speeds and remained in service for many years.




Cost: $8.99 M
Top speed: 160 km/h
Weight: 215 t
Power: 3,450 kW
Tractive effort: 291 kN
Running costs: $1.50 M/year
Lifespan: 45 years
Length: 24 m

4-8-8-4 Big Boy | From 1944 To 1994
This articulated locomotive was a real monster and carried the latest in steam technology. They were used primarily to haul freight over the Wasatch mountains between Green River and Ogden.




Cost: $11.6 M
Top speed: 130 km/h
Weight: 567 t
Power: 4,560 kW
Tractive effort: 602.2 kN
Running costs: $1.93 M/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Length: 40 m

Alco PA | From 1946 To 1994
The Alco PA series has often been regarded as the most beautiful and aesthetically pleasing diesel locomotive ever built. P stood for Passenger and A referred to the unit having a cab.




Cost: $4.49 M
Top speed: 188 km/h
Weight: 139 t
Power: 1,680 kW
Tractive effort: 227 kN
Running costs: $748 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Length: 20 m

New Haven EP5 | From 1955 Onwards
The New Haven EP-5 was a double-ended mercury arc rectifier electric locomotive built by General Electric. It was built to haul passenger trains between New York City and New Haven.




Cost: $7.68 M
Top speed: 140 km/h
Weight: 135 t
Power: 3,000 kW
Tractive effort: 151 kN
Running costs: $1.28 M/year
Lifespan: 55 years
Length: 19 m

EMD GP 9 | From 1958 To 2007
GM's Electro-Motive Division GP9 series found enormous success and became one of the most successful diesel locomotives ever built.




Cost: $3.22 M
Top speed: 105 km/h
Weight: 117 t
Power: 1,300 kW
Tractive effort: 288 kN
Running costs: $537 K/year
Lifespan: 45 years
Length: 17 m

EMD SD40-2 | From 1972 Onwards
The SD40-2s have become icons. One can spot them in virtually any place on practically any given train.




Cost: $5.55 M
Top speed: 105 km/h
Weight: 167 t
Power: 2,240 kW
Tractive effort: 410 kN
Running costs: $926 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Length: 21 m

EMD AEM-7 | From 1975 Onwards
These locomotives used the latest in electric technology featuring thyristor motor control and traction motors that provided maximum power without wheel slip.




Cost: $11.7 M
Top speed: 201 km/h
Weight: 92 t
Power: 4,320 kW
Tractive effort: 239.9 kN
Running costs: $1.95 M/year
Lifespan: 55 years
Length: 16 m

GE C40-8W | From 1989 Onwards
This 6-axle diesel-electric locomotive built by GE Transportation is distinguished from the Dash 8-40C by the addition of a "wide" or "safety" cab.




Cost: $7.49 M
Top speed: 113 km/h
Weight: 177 t
Power: 3,000 kW
Tractive effort: 483 kN
Running costs: $1.25 M/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Length: 22 m

Ge E60C-2 | From 1992 Onwards
One type of a modular product platform of electric and diesel-electric mainline locomotives from General Electronics, built in both freight and passenger variants.




Cost: $10.4 M
Top speed: 160 km/h
Weight: 176 t
Power: 4,000 kW
Tractive effort: 334 kN
Running costs: $1.74 M/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Length: 20 m

GE P42 DC | From 2005 Onwards
The GE Genesis series is unique among recently manufactured North American passenger locomotives in that it uses a single, monocoque carbody design, thus making it lighter.




Cost: $8.26 M
Top speed: 160 km/h
Weight: 122 t
Power: 3,170 kW
Tractive effort: 280 kN
Running costs: $1.38 M/year
Lifespan: 55 years

HHP 8 | From 2010 Onwards
HHP-8 means High Horse Power 8000. The twin-cab electric locomotive was manufactured for use by Westrail and the Maryland Area Regional Commuter system.




Cost: $16.2 M
Top speed: 200 km/h
Weight: 100 t
Power: 6,000 kW
Tractive effort: 360 kN
Running costs: $2.70 M/year
Lifespan: 55 years
Multiple Units
M-300 | FRom 1924 To 1972
These gas-powered, self-propelled passenger railcars were nicknamed "Skunks" because people said "You can smell 'em before you can see 'em."




Cost: $1.01 M
Capacity: 13
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 100 km/h
Weight: 25 t
Power: 200 kW
Tractive effort: 30 kN
Running costs: $168 K/year
Lifespan: 35 years
Loading speed: 2.0x
Length: 24 m

Pioneer Zephyr | From 1934 To 1985
The zephyr is formed of cars permanently articulated together with Jacobs bogies and built by one Budd Company. The train featured extensive use of stainless steel.




Cost: $5.08 M
Capacity: 52
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 177 km/h
Weight: 105 t
Power: 448 kW
Tractive effort: 80 kN
Running costs: $847 K/year
Lifespan: 35 years
Loading speed: 4.0x
Length: 56 m

Alco PA/PB | From 1946 To 1994
The Alco PB is the cabless booster unit B which matched the PAs and increased the horsepower rating.




Cost: $8.98 M
Top speed: 188 km/h
Weight: 278 t
Power: 3,360 kW
Tractive effort: 454 kN
Running costs: $1.50 M/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Length: 40 m

Metroliner | From 1969 Onwards
The Metroliners, as extra-fare express trains between Washington, D.C. and New York City, used self-powered electric multiple unit cars.




Cost: $16.5 M
Capacity: 81
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 193 km/h
Weight: 300 t
Power: 3,560 kW
Tractive effort: 340 kN
Running costs: $2.75 M/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Loading speed: 5.0x
Length: 104 m

Speedance Express | From 2000 Onwards
Speedance Express trains are the fastest trainsets in the Americas, attending 150 mph in revenue service on the North East Corridor. They use tilting technology to travel at higher speeds.




Cost: $36.6 M
Capacity: 102
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 240 km/h
Weight: 564 t
Power: 9,200 kW
Tractive effort: 450 kN
Running costs: $6.09 M/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 12.0x
Length: 203 m
Passenger Wagons
Passenger car | From 1850 To 1920
An early passenger car with wooden structure, offering only basic amenities on board.




Cost: $272 K
Capacity: 14
Top speed: 50 km/h
Weight: 20 t
Running costs: $45.3 K/year
Lifespan: 25 years
Loading speed: 2.0x
Length: 16 m

Clerestory passenger car | From 1875 To 1940
A passenger car with raised ceilings, called clerestory, to improve ventilation and increase comfort.




Cost: $498 K
Capacity: 16
Top speed: 80 km/h
Weight: 25 t
Running costs: $83.1 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 2.0x
Length: 19 m

Six-axle passenger car | From 1900 To 1965
Heavy passenger car with more comfort to cover the long distances across the USA.




Cost: $789 K
Capacity: 18
Top speed: 110 km/h
Weight: 45 t
Running costs: $132 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 2.0x
Length: 25 m

Heavyweight 28-1 Parlor | From 1915 To 1980
The classic "Pullman Heavyweight" passenger car was the mainstay of American railroading, and used by almost all railroads.




Cost: $1.45 M
Capacity: 19
Top speed: 180 km/h
Weight: 35 t
Running costs: $242 K/year
Lifespan: 35 years
Loading speed: 1.0x
Length: 26 m

Streamlined Coach New Mexico | From 1935 To 2000
As a first effort to make coaches lighter, this type was built from aluminum with corrugated side walls.




Cost: $1.12 M
Capacity: 18
Top speed: 150 km/h
Weight: 30 t
Running costs: $186 K/year
Lifespan: 35 years
Loading speed: 1.0x
Length: 24 m

All America Golden Sand | From 1950 Onwards
The former Southern Pacific coach "Golden Sand" was operated by All America. Built completely from aluminum, it featured advanced mechanical and operating systems.




Cost: $1.45 M
Capacity: 19
Top speed: 180 km/h
Weight: 35 t
Running costs: $242/year
Lifespan: 35 years
Loading speed: 1.0x
Length: 27 m

Westrail Westfleet | From 1971 Onwards
Westfleet is a fleet of single-level intercity railroad passenger cars built by the Budd Company for Westrail. The design is based on its earlier Metroliner electric multiple unit.




Cost: $1.82 M
Capacity: 21
Top speed: 201 km/h
Weight: 53 t
Running costs: $304 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Loading speed: 1.0x
Length: 26 m

Bombardier BiLevel | From 1976 Onwards
Bombardier BiLevel coaches are designed to carry lots of passengers for commuter railways. Easily identifiable, they are shaped like elongated octagons.




Cost: $1.89 M
Capacity: 33
Top speed: 140 km/h
Weight: 50 t
Running costs: $315 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Loading speed: 4.0x
Length: 26 m
Cargo Wagons
Gondola | From 1850 / 1905 / 1955 To 1907 / 1957 / Onwards




Cost: $281 K / $579 K / $1.20 M
Capacity: 7 / 12 / 18
Cargo type: Coal, Iron ore, Stone, Grain, Slag
Top speed: 80 km/h / 120 km/h / 160km/h
Weight: 10 t / 15 t / 20 t
Running costs: $36.3 K/year / $96.5 K/year / $200 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years / 45 years / 50 years
Loading speed: 1.0x / 2.0x / 3.0x
Length: 10 m / 12 m / 17 m

Tank wagon | From 1850 / 1899 / 1948 To 1901 / 1950 / Onwards




Cost: $218 K / $579 K / $1.20 M
Capacity: 7 / 12 / 18
Cargo type: Crude oil, Oil, Fuel
Top speed: 80 km/h / 120 km/h / 160km/h
Weight: 10 t / 15 t / 20 t
Running costs: $36.3 K/year / $96.5 K/year / $200 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years / 45 years / 50 years
Loading speed: 1.0x / 2.0x / 3.0x
Length: 9.4 m / 12 m / 17 m

Boxcar | From 1850 / 1902 / 1945 To 1904 / 1947 / Onwards




Cost: $218 K / $579 K / $1.20 M
Capacity: 7 / 12 / 18
Cargo type: Livestock, Plastic, Machines, Tools, Food, Goods
Top speed: 80 km/h / 120 km/h / 160km/h
Weight: 10 t / 15 t / 25 t
Running costs: $36.3 K/year / $96.5 K/year / $200 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years / 45 years / 50 years
Loading speed: 1.0x / 2.0x / 3.0x
Length: 10 m / 12 m / 15 m

Stake car | From 1850 / 1895 / 1952 To 1897 / 1954 / Onwards




Cost: $218 K / $579 K / $1.20 M
Capacity: 7 / 12 / 18
Cargo type: Logs, Steel, Planks, Construction material
Top speed: 80 km/h / 120 km/h / 160km/h
Weight: 8.0 t / 12 t / 15 t
Running costs: $36.3 K/year / $96.5 K/year / $200 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years / 45 years / 50 years
Loading speed: 1.0x / 2.0x / 3.0x
Length: 10 m / 12 m / 17 m
Trams
Horse tram | From 1850 To 1905
The first trams in history were horse-driven. Thanks to the rail only one horse was enough.



Cost: $17.2 K
Capacity: 5
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 15 km/h
Weight: 1.0 t
Power: 2.0 kW
Tractive effort: 2.0 kN
Running costs: $2.86 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 2.0x

Horse trolley car | From 1871 To 1926
The first trams in history were horse-driven. Thanks to the rail only one horse was enough.



Cost: $26.1 K
Capacity: 6
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 20 km/h
Weight: 1.0 t
Power: 2.0 kW
Tractive effort: 2.0 kN
Running costs: $4.35 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Loading speed: 2.0x

San Diego Electric Trolley | From 1893 To 1945
The Citizens Traction Company converted old cable cars to electrics. Later, the San Diego Electric Railway took over the Citizens company and converted the line to standard gauge.



Cost: $36.9 K
Capacity: 7
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 25 km/h
Weight: 8.0 t
Power: 35 kW
Tractive effort: 10 kN
Running costs: $6.15 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 3.0x

Peter Witt Streetcar | From 1917 To 1967
Designed by Cleveland Railway commissioner Peter Witt, this streetcar was used in many North American cities, most notably in Toronto and Cleveland.



Cost: $78.8 K
Capacity: 11
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 35 km/h
Weight: 12 t
Power: 60 kW
Tractive effort: 15 kN
Running costs: $13.1 K/year
Lifespan: 35 years
Loading speed: 4.0x

PCC 1643 Pittsburgh | From 1940 To 1990
The Presidents’ Conference Committee streetcar design proved very successful. As an example, Pittsburgh Railways operated 666 PCCs on 68 routes.



Cost: $127 K
Capacity: 14
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 45 km/h
Weight: 16 t
Power: 100 kW
Tractive effort: 24 kN
Running costs: $21.2 K/year
Lifespan: 35 years
Loading speed: 4.0x

Toronto PCC A-7 | From 1954 To 2004
The PCC A-7 ran on Toronto's busiest line, the ten-mile-long crosstown Bloor line, restrained by 56 traffic signals on a roundtrip.



Cost: $171 K
Capacity: 17
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 50 km/h
Weight: 17 t
Power: 144 kW
Tractive effort: 39 kN
Running costs: $28.6 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Loading speed: 4.0x

Toronto CRLV | From 1976 Onwards
The Canadian Light Rail Vehicle was the successful attempt to replace the aging PCCs by a modern, standardized streetcar.



Cost: $242 K
Capacity: 20
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 60 km/h
Weight: 22.7 t
Power: 272 kW
Tractive effort: 45 kN
Running costs: $40.3 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Loading speed: 4.0x

Skoda 10 T | From 2000 Onwards
The Skoda 10 T is a three-carbody-section low-floor bi-directional tram, developed by Skoda Transportation.



Cost: $353 K
Capacity: 25
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 70 km/h
Weight: 28.8 t
Power: 360 kW
Tractive effort: 100 kN
Running costs: $58.9 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 5.0x
Buses
Horse carriage | From 1850 To 1905
A common carriage used for public transportation in the early years.



Cost: $13.7 K
Capacity: 4
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 15 km/h
Weight: 1.0 t
Power: 2.0 kW
Tractive effort: 2.0 kN
Running costs: $2.29 K/year
Lifespan: 15 years
Loading speed: 1.0x

Stage coach | From 1875 To 1930
A common stage coach used for public transportation in the early years.



Cost: $19.9 K
Capacity: 5
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 18 km/h
Weight: 1.0 t
Power: 2.0 kW
Tractive effort: 2.0 kN
Running costs: $3.32 K/year
Lifespan: 15 years
Loading speed: 1.0x

Mack | From 1900 To 1952
In 1900, the Mack brothers introduced their first successful vehicle. The Mack bus racked up a million miles of service.



Cost: $47.4 K
Capacity: 9
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 25 km/h
Weight: 4.0 t
Power: 20 kW
Tractive effort: 6.0 kN
Running costs: $7.91 K/year
Lifespan: 20 years
Loading speed: 1.5x

Schneider PB2 | From 1921 To 1975
The Schneider PB2 was originally a French military transporter in World War I. Later it was exported and used as a bus in many American cities.



Cost: $71.6 K
Capacity: 10
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 35 km/h
Weight: 5.0 t
Power: 45 kW
Tractive effort: 8.0 kN
Running costs: $11.9 K/year
Lifespan: 20 years
Loading speed: 2.0x

Twin Coach 44-S | From 1942 To 1989
Twin Coach was an American vehicle manufacturing company from 1927 to 1955, based in Kent, Ohio.



Cost: $111 K
Capacity: 11
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 50 km/h
Weight: 6.9 t
Power: 88 kW
Tractive effort: 10 kN
Running costs: $18.5 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 2.0x

GM Fishbowl | From 1959 To 2010
Commonly known by the nickname Fishbowl for its six-piece rounded windshield, more than 44,000 units of this iconic North American bus were produced.



Cost: $157 K
Capacity: 12
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 65 km/h
Weight: 8.0 t
Power: 105 kW
Tractive effort: 14 kN
Running costs: $26.2 K/year
Lifespan: 25 years
Loading speed: 3.0x

Chevrolet C60 | From 1976 Onwards
The C60 belongs to the Chevrolet GMC B-Series and was built in many types and used as school bus, in mass transit and for other purposes.



Cost: $211 K
Capacity: 13
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 80 km/h
Weight: 6.0 t
Power: 150 kW
Tractive effort: 20 kN
Running costs: $35.1 K/year
Lifespan: 25 years
Loading speed: 2.0x

New Flyer D40 | From 1990 Onwards
The D40 was a transit bus built by New Flyer Industries. It used hollow tube construction, fiberglass paneling and wheel housings in stainless steel.



Cost: $275 K
Capacity: 15
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 90 km/h
Weight: 12 t
Power: 190 kW
Tractive effort: 28 kN
Running costs: $45.8 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 3.0x

Wright StreetCar | From 2008 Onwards
The Wright StreetCar is an articulated bus developed by Wrightbus and Volvo. It features a separate driver compartment at the front and is air-conditioned.



Cost: $532 K
Capacity: 26
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 100 km/h
Weight: 30 t
Power: 220 kW
Tractive effort: 36 kN
Running costs: $88.7 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 4.0x
Trucks
Horse wagon | From 1850 To 1905
A two-horse vehicle with a simple twin axle carriage.



Cost: $13.7 K
Capacity: 4
Cargo type: (anything, except for passengers)
Top speed: 15 km/h
Weight: 1.5 t
Power: 2.0 kW
Tractive effort: 1.8 kN
Running costs: $2.29 K/year
Lifespan: 15 years
Loading speed: 1.0x

American horse cart | From 1872 To 1925
A two-horse vehicle with a simple twin axle carriage.



Cost: $21.7 K
Capacity: 5
Cargo type: (anything, except for passengers)
Top speed: 20 km/h
Weight: 1.0 t
Power: 2.0 kW
Tractive effort: 2.0 kN
Running costs: $3.62 K/year
Lifespan: 15 years
Loading speed: 1.0x

Steam Lorry | From 1894 To 1945
Seam wagons were a widespread form of powered road traction for commercial haulage in the early part of the twentieth century.



Cost: $31.6 K
Capacity: 6
Cargo type: (anything, except for passengers)
Top speed: 25 km/h
Weight: 1.0 t
Power: 4.0 kW
Tractive effort: 5.0 kN
Running costs: $5.27 K/year
Lifespan: 20 years
Loading speed: 1.0x

Mack AC | From 1916 To 1965
The heavy duty AC, with its well known tapered hood, was the truck which started the bulldog theme. With a 6.2l 4 cylinder engine and chain drive, it was strong and reliable.



Cost: $49.7 K
Capacity: 8
Cargo type: (anything, except for passengers)
Top speed: 30 km/h
Weight: 3.0 t
Power: 34 kW
Tractive effort: 7.0 kN
Running costs: $8.28 K/year
Lifespan: 20 years
Loading speed: 2.0x

Ford Model 77 | From 1930 To 1980
An ubiquitous truck, built as a standard platform with a lot of different bodies, for example pickup, sedan, stake bed truck and panel delivery truck.



Cost: $73.1 K
Capacity: 9
Cargo type: (anything, except for passengers)
Top speed: 40 km/h
Weight: 2.5 t
Power: 60 kW
Tractive effort: 9.0 kN
Running costs: $12.2 K/year
Lifespan: 25 years
Loading speed: 2.0x

Studebaker US6 U3 / U5 / U10| From 1945 To 1995
The Studebaker US6 is a class of 2.5 ton trucks manufactured by the Studebaker Corporation during World War II, later used in civil service.



Cost: $157 K
Capacity: 13
Cargo type:
- Logs, Livestock, Steel, Planks, Plastic, Construction material, Machines, Tools, Food, Goods
- Crude oil, Oil, Fuel
- Coal, Iron ore, Stone, Grain, Slag
Top speed: 60 km/h
Weight: 5.0 t
Power: 100 kW
Tractive effort: 12 kN
Running costs: $26.2 K/year
Lifespan: 25 years
Loading speed: 3.0x

Peterbilt 359 | From 1970 Onwards
The durable Peterbilt 359 "Bull Nose" is considered a high-performance truck with low maintenance. Its powerful engine and many chrome parts made it a favorite of the North American truckers.



Cost: $308 K
Capacity: 19
Cargo type: (anything, except for passengers)
Top speed: 80 km/h
Weight: 20 t
Power: 300 kW
Tractive effort: 44 kN
Running costs: $51.4 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 4.0x

Freightliner Cascadia | From 1995 Onwards
The Cascadia is a heavy duty semi-trailer truck and the flagship of Freightliner. It was available in fuel efficient and high performance models.



Cost: $430 K
Capacity: 21
Cargo type: (anything, except for passengers)
Top speed: 100 km/h
Weight: 25 t
Power: 400 kW
Tractive effort: 52 kN
Running costs: $71.7 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 5.0x
Planes
Junkers F 13 | From 1920 To 1950
The Junkers F 13 was the world's first all-metal transport aircraft, developed in Germany at the end of World War I.





Cost: $179 K
Capacity: 3
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 140 km/h
Weight: 1.0 t
Thrust: 3.5 kN
Running costs: $29.8 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 1.0x

Dornier Merkur | From 1925 To 1960
The Dornier Merkur was a German passenger aircraft, built in the Dornier factories in Friedrichshafen.





Cost: $349 K
Capacity: 5
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 175 km/h
Weight: 2.3 t
Thrust: 8.0 kN
Running costs: $58.1 K/year
Lifespan: 30 years
Loading speed: 1.0x

Douglas DC-3 | From 1935 To 1970
The Douglas DC-3 is a fixed-wing propeller-driven airliner. Its cruise speed and range revolutionized air transport in the 1930s and 1940s.





Cost: $963 K
Capacity: 8
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 333 km/h
Weight: 7.7 t
Thrust: 25 kN
Running costs: $160 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Loading speed: 2.0x

Douglas DC-4 | From 1944 To 1975
The Douglas DC-4 is a four-engine (piston) propeller-driven airliner developed by the Douglas Aircraft Company. From 1945, many civil airlines operated it worldwide.





Cost: $1.97 M
Capacity: 15
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 365 km/h
Weight: 20 t
Thrust: 70 kN
Running costs: $329 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Loading speed: 2.0x

Lockheed Super Constellation | From 1952 To 1986
The Lockheed L-1049 Super Constellation is an American aircraft, a member of the Lockheed Constellation aircraft line.





Cost: $4.05 M
Capacity: 23
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 489 km/h
Weight: 31 t
Thrust: 150 kN
Running costs: $675 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 4.0x

De Havilland Comet 4B | From 1960 To 1990
Originally developed for Capital Airlines as the 4A, the 4B featured greater capacity through a 2m longer fuselage, and a shorter wingspan.





Cost: $5.62 M
Capacity: 21
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 725 km/h
Weight: 33 t
Thrust: 188 kN
Running costs: $937 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Loading speed: 4.0x

Boeing 737 | From 1968 To 2000
The Boeing 737 is an American short- to medium-range twinjet narrow-body airliner.





Cost: $6.09 M
Capacity: 21
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 780 km/h
Weight: 28 t
Thrust: 128 kN
Running costs: $1.01 M/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 6.0x

Concorde | From 1976 Onwards
The Concorde is a British-French turbojet-powered supersonic passenger jet airliner that was operated until 2003.





Cost: $20.0 M
Capacity: 24
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 2,158 km/h
Weight: 79 t
Thrust: 560 kN
Running costs: $3.34 M/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 4.0x

Boeing 757 | From 1984 Onwards
The Boeing 757 is the manufacturer's largest single-aisle passenger aircraft and was produced from 1981 to 2004.





Cost: $18.5 M
Capacity: 55
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 895 km/h
Weight: 58 t
Thrust: 360 kN
Running costs: $3.09 M/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 10.0x

Airbus A320 | From 1992 Onwards
Technically, the name A320 only refers to the original mid-sized aircraft, but it is often informally used to indicate any of the A318/A319/A320/A321 family.





Cost: $11.8 M
Capacity: 38
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 828 km/h
Weight: 44 t
Thrust: 236 kN
Running costs: $1.96 M/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 7.0x
Ships
Rigi | From 1850 To 1930
The parts of the Rigi were built in England and assembled in Luzern. Due to the lack of coal in Switzerland at the time, the Rigi was powered by wood.






Cost: $216 K
Capacity: 50
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 22 km/h
Weight: 67 t
Power: 80 kW
Running costs: $36.1 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 20.0x

Wilhelm I | From 1850 To 1910
The Wilhelm was built with the support of King Wilhelm I. of Wurttemberg and was officially the first steamer on the Lake Constance.






Cost: $187 K
Capacity: 50
Cargo type: (anything, except for passengers)
Top speed: 20 km/h
Weight: 149 t
Power: 85 kW
Running costs: $31.2 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 20.0x

Zoroaster | From 1860 To 1910
Many consider the Zoroaster to be the first successful oil tanker. Unlike later models, it was built small enough to sail canals and also the Volga River.






Cost: $225 K
Capacity: 60
Cargo type: Crude oil, Oil, Fuel
Top speed: 20 km/h
Weight: 350 t
Power: 200 kW
Running costs: $37.5 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 20.0x

Frontenac | From 1885 To 1940
The Frontenac was built for 50'000 dollars in New York and was in service on the Cayuga Lake for several decades.






Cost: $417 K
Capacity: 75
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 26 km/h
Weight: 206 t
Power: 180 kW
Running costs: $69.5 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 30.0x

Klondike | From 1898 To 1960
The Klondike had the distinction of a much higher capacity than regular sternwheelers, despite its shallow draft.






Cost: $472 K
Capacity: 100
Cargo type: (anything, except for passengers)
Top speed: 23 km/h
Weight: 600 t
Power: 391 kW
Running costs: $78.6 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 40.0x

Vandal | From 1900 To 1960
The Vandal is one of the first ships built with a Diesel engine and an electrical transmission.



Cost: $786 K
Capacity: 150
Cargo type: Crude oil, Oil, Fuel
Top speed: 25 km/h
Weight: 700 t
Power: 500 kW
Running costs: $131 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 60.0x

Schaffhausen | From 1913 To 1985
The Schaffhausen - a flush-deck vessel - was the last paddle-steamer operated by the Schweizer Dampfboot AG.






Cost: $588 K
Capacity: 100
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 27 km/h
Weight: 135 t
Power: 294 kW
Running costs: $98.0 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 40.0x

Zurich | From 1935 Onwards
The more than 80 year old Zurich has its home port in Romanshorn. It is still in use for public transportation on the Lake Constance.






Cost: $671 K
Capacity: 125
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 25 km/h
Weight: 235 t
Power: 441 kW
Running costs: $112 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 50.0x

Viola | From 1950 Onwards
The Viola was built in Temse and was mainly used to haul fuel on the Rhine river.



Cost: $1.72 M
Capacity: 250
Cargo type: Crude oil, Oil, Fuel
Top speed: 30 km/h
Weight: 1,100 t
Power: 1,000 kW
Running costs: $287 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 100.0x

Axalp | From 1950 Onwards
The Axalp was designed by the famous Swiss naval architect Adolf J. Rynike. After commissioning it was upgraded several times.





Cost: $1.03 M
Capacity: 150
Cargo type: (anything, except for passengers)
Top speed: 30 km/h
Weight: 800 t
Power: 662 kW
Running costs: $172 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 60.0x

HC SR.N6 | From 1970 Onwards
The SR.N6 is a larger version of the SR.N5 series and became the most produced and successful hovercraft design in the world.






Cost: $564 K
Capacity: 15
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 93 km/h
Weight: 10 t
Power: 780 kW
Running costs: $94.0 K/year
Lifespan: 40 years
Loading speed: 5.0x

Graf Zeppelin | From 1980 Onwards
The individual parts of Graf Zeppelin were built in Linz, and the ship was finally put together in Fussach.






Cost: $950 K
Capacity: 175
Cargo type: Passengers
Top speed: 26 km/h
Weight: 360 t
Power: 678 kW
Running costs: $158 K/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 75.0x

Merlin | From 1990 Onwards
The motor cargo vessel Merlin is a modern river cargo ship which travels on the Donau.




Cost: $2.26 M
Capacity: 250
Cargo type: (anything, except for passengers)
Top speed: 36 km/h
Weight: 1,400 t
Power: 1,400 kW
Running costs: $377/year
Lifespan: 50 years
Loading speed: 100.0x
< >
27 Comments
jrnkl8 Jul 4 @ 10:25am 
2-8-0 Baldwin Class 56 and 2-6-0 Mogul should have their specs swapped...
omnius Dec 25, 2019 @ 8:18am 
Nice Guide! Is there a printer friendly version of this guide in PDF format?
신윤섭 Jul 23, 2019 @ 12:07am 
Metroliner(Multiple units) is available from 1971.
Please check it.
Saturnaaaaaa Jun 19, 2019 @ 5:55pm 
what are the weight units used in this guide? the game has two different kinds of tons/tonnes and i don't remember which is written as "t".
Saturnaaaaaa Feb 19, 2019 @ 11:45am 
Is there a guide that tells me when I unlock miscellaneous things like bus lanes? Would that work for this guide?
LatNWarrior Oct 7, 2018 @ 2:36pm 
Really great job; thank you for your time effort and shared knowledge it's appreciated!
Dionysusnu Jul 25, 2018 @ 12:50am 
Pioneer Zephyr full set is 86m, not 56m
Stormmaster Nov 20, 2017 @ 10:29am 
Here is something I've managed to get notes of.

Locomotives:
Baldwin's Six-Wheels = 8.4 m
The General = 16 m
Baldwin Class 56 = 17 m
Mogul = 18 m
Atlantic = 22 m
Mikado = 25 m
Milwaukee = 23 m
Class 9000 = 32 m
ALCO HH 600 = 14 m
Hiawatha = 27 m
Class PRR GG1 = 24 m
Big Boy = 40 m
Alco PA = 20 m
New Haven EP5 = 19 m
EMD GP 9 = 17 m
EMD SD40-2 = 21 m
EMD AEM-7 = 16 m
GE C40-8W = 22 m
Ge E60C-2 = 20 m

Multiple Units:
M-300 = 24 m; Pioneer Zephyr = 56 m; Alco PA/PB = 40 m; Metroliner = 104 m; Speedance Express = 203 m

Passenger Wagons:
Passenger car = 16 m
Clerestory passenger car = 19 m
Six-axle passenger car = 25 m
Heavyweight Parlor = 26 m
Streamlined Coach New Mexico = 24 m
All America Golden Sand = 27 m
Westrail Westfleet = 26 m
Bombardier BiLevel = 26 m

Cargo Wagons:
Gondola = 10 m / 12 m / 17 m
Tank wagon = 9.4 m / 12 m / 17 m
Boxcar = 10 m / 12 m / 15 m
Stake car = 10 m / 12 m / 17 m
Stormmaster Nov 20, 2017 @ 10:29am 
Along with the EU version this guide is one of the most useful I've seen on Steam. I look here all the time while playing a US scenario. And it could be even better with locomotives' and wagons lengths.
maculator Nov 14, 2017 @ 5:28pm 
F-You baldwind!
Says: "The "Consolidation" was a standard freight locomotive and could move trains twice as heavy at half the cost of its predecessors." and costs exactly twice as much as his predecessor...