The Sexy Brutale

The Sexy Brutale

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Skirlasvoud Apr 14, 2017 @ 7:02am
*Spoilers* My Ending Analysis *Spoilers*
Completed the game since yesterday and man, my mind is still reeling from that ending.


LAST WARNING! SPOILERS!


Never realized that The Sexy Brutale would be my own personal Silent Hill! This game, REALLY resonated with me. I also think I'm in a really good position to point out some of the fine details that others might miss:
Last edited by Skirlasvoud; Apr 14, 2017 @ 9:52am
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Showing 46-60 of 69 comments
Skirlasvoud Jun 13, 2017 @ 7:37am 
Yes, but we were discussing who Lucas would be able to fall back on. Him burning down the place, is selfish because he has other options - namely, his presumably self-employed friends - not that he's putting others out of work.

That he puts Redd out of work is a jack-♥♥♥ move though. Hadn't considered that.

Originally posted by Juzo Sakakura:
Actually, something interesting I noticed. l basically just went to see Lucas fall, because I just learned of it from this thread, And I started thinking about how the layout of the casino doesn't make sense. The clock tower is almost directly above the chapel, which is a ways away from the garden. Also, Lucas looks out over the casino and everything beyond, noting it's on fire, but the angle he was at wouldn't give him a good view of any of it at all. Thoughts?

As I understand it, it's a renovated church/cathedral.

http://www.englishcathedrals.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Cathedral_Exeter2.jpg

If he's in the clocktower, he does have a good view over the rest of the building from the window, or at least from the top down. Remember that the clock tower is basically on the far left side of the map in the game, somewhere above the library if I line up the charts. That's relatively near the garden and with that kind of height, he'd be able to see the rest of it from above, including the garden, which would be to the left of him.

And no, he might only have seen the roof of the casino, but he'd still be able to see the smoke pouring out and deduce the bombs had gone off.

Him landing where he did, could be because the way he leapt from great heights, or he could have landed on the roof and then rolled off. In fact, I'd say it's extremely likely he hit the roof first. Normal Cathedral belltowers are some of the tallest renaissance structures.


The game itself does not play around with distorted geometry enough, for me to think anything was meant with a slightly flawed layout.
Last edited by Skirlasvoud; Jun 13, 2017 @ 7:39am
Wyrtt Jun 15, 2017 @ 2:38am 
Originally posted by skirlasvoud:
Yes, but we were discussing who Lucas would be able to fall back on. Him burning down the place, is selfish because he has other options - namely, his presumably self-employed friends - not that he's putting others out of work.

That he puts Redd out of work is a jack-♥♥♥ move though. Hadn't considered that.

Originally posted by Juzo Sakakura:
Actually, something interesting I noticed. l basically just went to see Lucas fall, because I just learned of it from this thread, And I started thinking about how the layout of the casino doesn't make sense. The clock tower is almost directly above the chapel, which is a ways away from the garden. Also, Lucas looks out over the casino and everything beyond, noting it's on fire, but the angle he was at wouldn't give him a good view of any of it at all. Thoughts?

As I understand it, it's a renovated church/cathedral.

http://www.englishcathedrals.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Cathedral_Exeter2.jpg

If he's in the clocktower, he does have a good view over the rest of the building from the window, or at least from the top down. Remember that the clock tower is basically on the far left side of the map in the game, somewhere above the library if I line up the charts. That's relatively near the garden and with that kind of height, he'd be able to see the rest of it from above, including the garden, which would be to the left of him.

And no, he might only have seen the roof of the casino, but he'd still be able to see the smoke pouring out and deduce the bombs had gone off.

Him landing where he did, could be because the way he leapt from great heights, or he could have landed on the roof and then rolled off. In fact, I'd say it's extremely likely he hit the roof first. Normal Cathedral belltowers are some of the tallest renaissance structures.


The game itself does not play around with distorted geometry enough, for me to think anything was meant with a slightly flawed layout.
Here is a little problem. Lucas fell out of the window and saw how his wife running into the mansion to save her friends and husband.
Garden doesnt have a door, There is just a glass window that you break,
Casino doesnt have an entrance or proper windows at all.

Mansion layout is purely fictional.
Battler Ushiromiya Jun 15, 2017 @ 10:40am 
Originally posted by Wyrtt:
Originally posted by skirlasvoud:
Yes, but we were discussing who Lucas would be able to fall back on. Him burning down the place, is selfish because he has other options - namely, his presumably self-employed friends - not that he's putting others out of work.

That he puts Redd out of work is a jack-♥♥♥ move though. Hadn't considered that.



As I understand it, it's a renovated church/cathedral.

http://www.englishcathedrals.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Cathedral_Exeter2.jpg

If he's in the clocktower, he does have a good view over the rest of the building from the window, or at least from the top down. Remember that the clock tower is basically on the far left side of the map in the game, somewhere above the library if I line up the charts. That's relatively near the garden and with that kind of height, he'd be able to see the rest of it from above, including the garden, which would be to the left of him.

And no, he might only have seen the roof of the casino, but he'd still be able to see the smoke pouring out and deduce the bombs had gone off.

Him landing where he did, could be because the way he leapt from great heights, or he could have landed on the roof and then rolled off. In fact, I'd say it's extremely likely he hit the roof first. Normal Cathedral belltowers are some of the tallest renaissance structures.


The game itself does not play around with distorted geometry enough, for me to think anything was meant with a slightly flawed layout.
Here is a little problem. Lucas fell out of the window and saw how his wife running into the mansion to save her friends and husband.
Garden doesnt have a door, There is just a glass window that you break,
Casino doesnt have an entrance or proper windows at all.

Mansion layout is purely fictional.
I don't believe it's entirely fictional. If it's too obviously fictional, then Lucas might as well be watching a shw that happens to have all his fgriends dying. No, how the mansion looks is undoubtedly almost exactly the same. But there are definitely oddities with it. The garde not having any entrances could represent how Gold Skull doesn't want anyone getting near Elenoar. The casino itself not having entrances could represent the fact that Gold Skull doesn' want himself to run from his crimes, or perhaps the fact that his friends couldn't run from their fate of death.

Also, where did you get that Lucas saw his wife running toward the casino? That might have been said in this chain, but that was a theory.
Sairus323 Jun 29, 2017 @ 11:53pm 
just completed the game. someone here was talking about "there wasn't a house in the garden" but read "the secret heaven" in a "secrets" tab of brochure. it clearly says "the more time the marquise spends there, the more he wanted to retreat..." so i think this place was really existed, though it could be not in the gardens but somewhere in a more rural region, far from Sexy Brutale.
Skirlasvoud Jun 30, 2017 @ 3:14am 
It could be a thought, daydream or state of mind though. The more he thinks of raising a family in a simpler background, the less he likes being in the Casino.

I mean, I'd like to agree with you. It's more satisfying to me to think there is, but there's so much in this game that's dubious.
I just finished the game, and although the 'twist' was indeed predictable I was pleasantly surprised how little that mattered to how much I enjoyed the game and what I felt going through the ending sequences.

I don't have anything to add that hasn't already been stated much more eloquently here, but wanted to add my props to the developer(s) for such an amazingly crafted experience.
StompMeFlat Aug 1, 2017 @ 12:17pm 
I enjoy the connections between the Guests and their deaths/personality with his.

Reginald Sixpence- His work coming back to blow up in his face.

Trinity Carrington- Her desire for something she couldn't have led her to a trapped situation.

Clay Rockridge- His actions kept him from being with and being able to save his wife. The dealer's voices telling him something is wrong could easily pair with Lucas's own doubts on his plan. That something is wrong.

Willow Blue- Putting herself in over her head backfired and left her wishing she could die with the others.

Tequila Belle- Her passions and love turn against her and leave her bloody with nobody to run to for help. She will die alone and broken.

Redd Rockridge- Having to watch someone he care deeply for be trapped and killed in a horrible display. (Interesting enough Redd dies trying to save him, where as Lucas couldn't help anyone and watched)

Greyson Grayson- His greed got the better of him and he had to watch (trapped) as someone he cared for died a horrific death cause of him. All he wants in the end is to be forgiven, but it's too late.

Aurum Runes- Being the one with less knowledge on the science of the plan, he messes up the plan and pays for it with pain alongside the plan maker. He however barely escapes but it's too late to go back. (Aurum/Thanos to Lucas/Sixpence)

Thanos Gorecki- Comes up with a plan and knows something can go wrong. Still insists on going ahead with the plan despite the high risk. This results in a downfall that leaves him forever changed and stuck with the truth.


Also seeing as most of the characters worked for and helped make the building what it was, them going up in flames alongside them has strong symbolism as well. It's a very tragic game. Walking through all the deaths again with Gold Skull was painful. Heck, even hearing the bell ring or see the power flicker was painful knowing every time that was one of the characters I liked dying horribley every single day.
ttavoc Aug 2, 2017 @ 3:52pm 
The ending hit me like a sledgehammer. When he finally left his personal hell, saving all his friends for the very last time... I had tears in my eyes.

I where so shocked when it turned out that everything was only in his imagination. That he killed his best friends years ago.

It was really touching in a way I never awaited from this game.
Gorinich Aug 16, 2017 @ 3:54pm 
Another element that hasn't been brought up yet is the ghostly presence. I think that on hand they are the born from Lucas's worries and ponderings about the afterlife. Which is to be expected from witnessing death, that's how stories of ghost have been born and spread sence time immorium. But I think they are also the remnants of his humor, as they float around nonchlantly and produce gags of various sorts. Humor is a trait that allows people to accept the troubles of the world, to not let it's weight crush them. Which can be seen in the ghosts in how they don't really give a damn about anything substansal and talk about how nice Tequila sings, where the smut is, or whatever else. Thier representations of the same emotion that inspires the nihilistic dank memes you find across the internet. But they don't have any segnificant sway over the psyphe of Lucas becouse he don't believe he deserves any relief from his shame and grief.
Skirlasvoud Aug 16, 2017 @ 4:07pm 
I always considered them to be the recollections of his staff, but I hadn't thought about them like that yet! Definitly valid input and an interesting way of looking at it.
Mitsukurina Sep 3, 2017 @ 12:54am 
Just wanted to add my thoughts:

As everyone has mentioned, the basement is where things get from strange to stranger, I have some regrets not doing my little bit of research when the devs threw in references outside of the game. In one of the rooms there was a Japanese painting and investigating one of the spots talked about a story which I'm sure had some significance to the plot.

The one thing I noticed was during the graveyard scene where you're re-arranging each different colored rose and corresponding them to the gallery, you end up with the red rose in your hands. Looking back at it makes it seem so very satisfying to catch the detail and you can imagine what it means for the empty (possibly unmarked? my memory is hazy) grave next to Eleanors.

Another thing I want to comment on is the amount of detail they put into the background features, from paintings to furniture and items. In combination with your melodic soundtrack, it really gives the feeling of a timeless atmosphere (assuming you keep away from the people and action!). At the chapel, I noticed the stained glass is actually of Eleanor and the baby (born), leading me to wonder just how much of the mansion was imagination versus memory from reality.

*** My thoughts on the game in general are below, feel free to skip this part since it doesn't necessarily add to the analysis of the game ***

As you catch on to more and more of what is occurring in the mansion like the lights flickering, what this damn show the marquis keeps going on about, and the suit statues being pulled making that sound over and over, it kind of gives you more and more aha moments. One of the things that I couldn't find explained was the glass breaking around 4 PM and the figure landing in the garden, until the end of it all. Something about the events having more meaning behind them adds to the satisfying feeling you get knowing that part of the mystery is a little more shed upon itself.

I unfortunately didn't find 99% of the game a 10/10, but what Sexy Brutale executed in perfect fashion (and I know people can disagree with me here) is the absolute astounding ending. If I had to rate the game without the ending it'd probably be a 7 for me, enjoyable gameplay and quirky mechanics that gave me some nice stories. The ending that tied everything up together, that gave you the emotional impact behind everything is really what makes this game one of a kind.

I have to compare it to Nier Automata in that most of the gameplay you face is quite mundane after you've gone through several hours of it, but the ending parts are executed in a spectacular fashion that is equivalent to a great movie plot twist such as The Prestige. I will say Sexy Brutale will likely stick with me for quite some time, similar to a great show that has finally ended and leaves you with that black pit feeling afterwards. I went in with some expectation of it being decent based on all the critics and reviewers, and came out of the experience that much more enlightened.

The game doesn't feel too preachy with its message and honestly part of it makes me wonder if the "evil" Lucas had a good point to make. Everyone knows what choice is the right one to make at the end, but there's a twisted sense of fulfillment in the fantasy Lucas imprisons himself within. I think everyone who dislikes Lucas is giving him a particularly hard time, it's pretty easily seen that he cares for his friends despite everything being a recreation of his memories. Burning down his mansion was a means to start fresh, and was never meant to bring harm to anyone. As noted at the clock tower, he even told Boone that he had a thrill putting the plans together. An eccentric rich man that's trying to shed his skin of the darker past is what he is. That's why it's so hard to get over something like this.

Gold Skull Lucas ended up breaking down at the clock tower when he mentioned the unborn child, something that you would think is not fitting of his character trait considering how cold he was to us throughout the whole story. I've heard couples that say they never really get over a miscarriage, not only did Lucas have to deal with not being able to see his flesh and blood, HE was the reason for it. Stack on top of that the guilt of your wife's death, and all your friends, and this delusion doesn't seem so far fetched. Someone so wrought in this kind of guilt can't just simply forgive himself and move on, if you could, I wouldn't call you human. At some point it relates all too much with life, and how you and I have our own regrets or failures that we find ourselves reminiscing over and over. We might have people that we are seeking forgiveness that aren't around anymore. Sexy Brutale walks us through how one might be able to triumph that obstacle of never being given the salvation one is searching for. And the components we did have that was on our side throughout was just one or two things: time, and hope (in the shape of Bloody Eleanor).

Hopefully my rambling helped some of you guys, the devs definitely hit it out of the park with this one. Thanks for reading.
Tenebrais Sep 16, 2017 @ 8:01am 
Originally posted by StompMeFlat:
I enjoy the connections between the Guests and their deaths/personality with his.

Reginald Sixpence- His work coming back to blow up in his face.

Trinity Carrington- Her desire for something she couldn't have led her to a trapped situation.

Clay Rockridge- His actions kept him from being with and being able to save his wife. The dealer's voices telling him something is wrong could easily pair with Lucas's own doubts on his plan. That something is wrong.

Willow Blue- Putting herself in over her head backfired and left her wishing she could die with the others.

Tequila Belle- Her passions and love turn against her and leave her bloody with nobody to run to for help. She will die alone and broken.

Redd Rockridge- Having to watch someone he care deeply for be trapped and killed in a horrible display. (Interesting enough Redd dies trying to save him, where as Lucas couldn't help anyone and watched)

Greyson Grayson- His greed got the better of him and he had to watch (trapped) as someone he cared for died a horrific death cause of him. All he wants in the end is to be forgiven, but it's too late.

Aurum Runes- Being the one with less knowledge on the science of the plan, he messes up the plan and pays for it with pain alongside the plan maker. He however barely escapes but it's too late to go back. (Aurum/Thanos to Lucas/Sixpence)

Thanos Gorecki- Comes up with a plan and knows something can go wrong. Still insists on going ahead with the plan despite the high risk. This results in a downfall that leaves him forever changed and stuck with the truth.


Also seeing as most of the characters worked for and helped make the building what it was, them going up in flames alongside them has strong symbolism as well. It's a very tragic game. Walking through all the deaths again with Gold Skull was painful. Heck, even hearing the bell ring or see the power flicker was painful knowing every time that was one of the characters I liked dying horribley every single day.

I'd been pondering these. Even before seeing the main twist, I'd recognised most of the deaths so far as ironic extensions of their flaws - Trinity's rebelliousness, Clay's alcoholism, Tequila's jealousy, Greyson's literal sticky fingers, and so on. In light of the ending, I've had an additional thought about the whole situation.

As Lucas relived the deaths of his friends and family over and over, he turned it into a scenario where he knowingly and willfully had them killed, as a way of reminding himself of his responsibility, this we know. But it isn't just that - they all get themselves into the situations where they die. They could have avoided their fates if they didn't have these flaws, aspects of their personalities that likely hurt Lucas at some point in their pasts. He didn't just create a scenario where their deaths were deliberate. He created a scenario in which they deserved it. In trying to remind himself of his own hand in their deaths, he's also shifted the blame onto the victims. And in a sense this may reflect on his view of the real events that happened - all of them died because they made the tragic mistake of befriending Lucas Bonde.

There are two exceptions. Reginald and Eleanor. Reginald is the only guest killed directly by the staff, hunted down with a shotgun with no bearing on what Reginald was actually doing at the time. Reginald is also the only one to get a mention in Lucas' own story in the mansion. He mentions that if Sixpence had been doing the work it would have been much neater and tidier. It's unspoken, but if Sixpence had made the bombs, they would have worked correctly, and no one would have died. Of all the victims of the fire, Reginald is the only one that could have averted the whole thing if Lucas had thought to involve him. Lucas' decision to keep him out of it got everyone killed. So, in his hell-dream, Lucas inverts it- Reginald is on the verge of discovering the whole bomb plot (the plot that doesn't happen) and Lucas' staff kills him off before he can do anything about it. Lucas doesn't give himself the luxury of giving Reginald a fitting death, because the moment he gets Reginald more involved in the fantasy he's confronted with the fact he would have saved them.

Eleanor, of course, is the other big exception. The one victim of the real fire that doesn't die in the fantasy. In fact, she's shut away, far away from the mansion and the gold skull's influence. Through all the horrifying events Lucas forces himself to imagine, he still craves letting Eleanor live happily ever after.
But it cannot last that way. He imagines all of his friends' flaws and foibles and uses them to kill them, but he just cannot project that sort of fantasy onto Eleanor. He cannot forget the sight of her burned to death - and he cannot picture flaws of her character. She is, to him, his patient, forgiving wife, who loves him and has faith in him despite everything. He tries to keep that image far away from the hell of his own creation, but she comes in at the edges, and slowly but surely convinces him to forgive himself and move on.

Eleanor is the only character in the game that never wears a mask. Even the ghosts of the mansion, that don't seem to represent anything in particular in real life (though perhaps they might be there to represent other people who died in the fire - real staff or unfamiliar guests that Lucas didn't know personally, so doesn't remember well enough to kill specifically but remains haunted by their spectres) wear masks. And the bloodied girl tells you at the start that the masks are controlling them. The characters in the fantasy are distortions of their real people, with the flaws highlighted to get them killed at Lucas' hands. Those exaggerations, the masks over the faces of the real people, are driving them to follow the script of the fantasy and will chase you away so you can't interfere when you encounter them. But if you can disrupt the murders and break the script, they drop their masks, and Lucas is confronted with the real people they once were, and must consider what they really would have thought of him. They weren't his enemies, that he killed out of spite - they were his friends, people who shared their lives with him, who respected and liked him. The whole plot of the game is Lucas' memories of Eleanor pushing him to realise the memories of his friends, so that he might finally make peace with their deaths.
Tenebrais Sep 19, 2017 @ 10:51am 
Just an addition to the above, that occurred to me today.

Some of the deaths don't make so much sense in terms of character flaws. Willow, Redd, Thanos - they don't make much sense in that light, but could their deaths have been driven by jealousy? They all show traits that make them superior to Lucas in some way, things he might have held against them in a similar way as other characters' flaws.

Willow has the gift of seeing ghosts. She was born into it; it's in her blood. Which means she has something Lucas could never, ever obtain. Sure, plenty of the other guests did things he couldn't, but there's nothing saying that if Lucas really dedicated himself he couldn't have been a great sculptor, or artist or singer. But nothing would give Lucas the same insight into the occult that Willow has. And it's that sight that kills her - in fact, you explicitly save her by snuffing out her candle and hiding the juju guppy from her.

Redd dies for love. He has a number of qualities but the most apparent through the whole scenario is his dedication to Greyson. He would go to the ends of the earth and beyond for him. He dies throwing himself at a clearly lethal trap just for the slim chance he might give Greyson a chance to escape. Could Lucas ever show that kind of devotion to Eleanor? He loved her dearly, but we never see a single sign of him making sacrifices for her. Perhaps he felt insecure that he couldn't show his wife the same regard that Redd shows for someone that doesn't even know he likes him.

Thanos is the architect of the mansion. He knows it inside and out. Some might see he knows it even better than the Marquis. Would Lucas have felt unnerved by someone knowing his own home so well? Is it coincidence that what kills Thanos is that he doesn't know something about the mansion - that he's wrong about the combination that opens the elevator? The puzzle would have worked just as well if he'd got the right symbol but that staff member messed it up. But no, Thanos is explicitly wrong about what the statues should be set to, and that is what kills him.


One final thought. The staff member that kills Sixpence is one of the more talkative ones. He's the very first thing you see in the main mansion in the foyer, talking to himself about how competent he is, getting all the tricky jobs. But his job is both simple and sloppy - killing a man directly with a shotgun. It's so unsubtle the entire mansion hears it, and most of them comment on it. And then he complains about how hard it is going to be to clean up, and he doesn't even bother to do anything with Sixpence's body. The staff member that kills Sixpence is arrogant, lazy and sloppy - those same qualities Lucas displayed with his bomb ploy, that even at the time he was aware Sixpence could have helped better with.
Perhaps Sixpence's death is saying more about Lucas than it is about Reignald.
TroeLar Dec 30, 2017 @ 5:03pm 
I recently read through this thread... I might be misremembering, but I don't think there was much more than a passing mention of the tree in the prison room in the basement.

I just thought one view of it is, that the tree represents the hope which the player embodies.

Only by slowly watering it over the years does the tree come to fruition - that is; only over the years is hope able to overcome the despair which Lucas feels.

The tree of hope is slowly growing, being watered only very very little every day. And, as I think has been mentioned, the tree is outside the cell, so is being watered from outside - that is, being watered by "Eleanor" (subconsciously Lucas I guess).
One thing I think everyone missed is the basement. The soundtrack has a rather blunt title for the corresponding track: Below Consciousness. I don't think I need to say more.
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