CrossCode

CrossCode

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CrossCode > General Discussions > Topic Details
Aevoa Jun 17, 2016 @ 4:33pm
Why isn't this more popular?
It's super solid from what I've played - controls are tight and combat is super fun. The pixel art is really good too. This seems like the kind of game that would draw a lot of attention, yet it seems somewhat unknown... Weird.
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Showing 1-15 of 64 comments
lachsen  [developer] Jun 18, 2016 @ 4:04am 
Yeah, that is always the big question. Marketing is difficult and it's not enough to just create a good game - you also need to put in a lot of effort to promote it.

We tried really hard to promote the game during the Indiegogo campaign - it was just barely enough to reach our funding goal.

Now we focus in development and don't really do a lot of work to promote CrossCode. We just try to stay in touch with the community. This will of course change when we are close to the release.

So yeah, on the one hand it's a lack of effort to promote the game at the moment. But maybe it's something else as well.

I always have the theory, that CrossCode doesn't really have the "best first impression". That means it may not look quite as good as it feels when you actually play it. It may also be related to the fact that the graphics style of CrossCode is very RPG-Maker like, which isn't all that popular among many people. All of that makes it harder to promote the game.

Some things we are currently working on, hoping to improve the first impression a bit:
1. Reworking character portraits and other large scale character sprites within the game
2. Create new promotion graphics (e.g. poster, Steam banners) - this is currently still WIP
3. Creating a new trailer showing new content with a focus on the new boss fights etc.

I actually would be very curious what your first impression was on CrossCode. Have you been surprised when you played the game in compared to what you saw on the videos/screenshots? Any ideas on how we could better promote the game? Any feedback would be very helpful for us.
Aftenpoften Jun 18, 2016 @ 4:45am 
I remember someone recommending I try the demo, and I gave it a shot because why the heck not. Then I was simply blown away by the gameplay, and addicted since. I honestly wasn't expecting it to be this responsive and fast-paced when I jumped in the first time, because I've been let down by poor performance or unresponsive controls too many times before.
I'm trying to spread it to my friends, but it's difficult. D: Not all of them are open-minded about indie games.
Utima Jun 18, 2016 @ 10:42am 
I also felt like the game was very solid in many ways; the story, music, graphics, gameplay, character interactions etc. But I also think that the problem lies in the "first impression".

I first played the demo version before buying this game. At first when the character Shizuka was introduced I started thinking that this is some random geeks attempt at making a very weeaboo game. This doesn't bother me but I can imagine some people to be bothered by it. Then I started moving around and the fluid movement and controls surprised me very much. After the first fight I felt that a game with combat mechanics such as this could be very good.

Then the game jumped into Lea and introduced the "ball throwing" and puzzle mechanics. At that point I got a bit confused and started thinking that maybe this game isn't what I first expected. However I started to slowly see that this was not only meant as a part of combat mechanics but also as the games puzzle solving gimmick that the games puzzles would revolve around, and I thought that it was pretty cool.

The ships basement turned out to be another tutorial during which the combat mechanics were introduced again but this time with a mix of melee+ranged. At this point various questions and parts of the story started trickling in, but it wasn't until I got out of the tutorial area to the rest of the ship when things started to get awesome. It was fun to explore the ship and talk to various npcs and listen in on their discussions. Leas reactions throughout the game have also been a source of enjoyment.

In the end though it was the introduction of the croissant in the horizon and the mystery that the floaty blue guy brought that made me want to know how the story continues.

I agree with lachsen though that they should rework stuff and make the trailers and screenshots better so that people can tell more precisely what the game is about. I imagine things will start to roll once the game is nearly finished.
Budthespud3226 Jun 18, 2016 @ 5:14pm 
I was thinking of buying a copy for someone who I feel would enjoy the game, who is actually a Partnered Twitch Streamer. Maybe you could get some promotion for the game by giving game keys to some well known streamers? I know a couple of the games in my library came from streamers recomendations. From watching their playthroughs I wanted to give the games a try myself.
Regiden  [developer] Jun 19, 2016 @ 7:51am 
Concerning Streamers and Youtubers we often got the feedback that the game should be handed out to them once the game is done. Like giving out a press version so to speak. Usually that involves simply direclty giving them a steam key.
So once the game is done and all we going to do that for sure! But before we don't want to fall into the trap of showing of a half-finished game if that makes sense.
As Lachsen said, marketing is hard... especially for german dudes that don't have the money and time to visited a lot of gameing related events (Especially does in America, like PAX, which seems to be such a good way to show off a game).

To be honest if we would have some that would travel and show the game around, I think it would certainly help too :D
mattCTRL Jun 19, 2016 @ 9:00am 
I'm a brand new player myself; I actively look for and purchase indie developed games on Steam. So the Early Access announcement on the main page was what got my attention. Usually I won't go for Early Access just because of previous problems with other developers. The demo is what clinched it for me. I was about halfway through the ship intro tutorials and was just like "f***, I'm gonna need more of this sandwich". Having that demo is killer for you guys.

Also, I'd probably compare you guys to the early stages of Terraria (probably my favorite indie game). They picked up a following during their Early Access as well and grew to what they are now. A lot of that growth I think was because of their community involvement. They teased a ton of content on their website and social media. Also lots of early release streams of new content patches with streamers. I've yet to catch one of your Dev streams but if that was regularly scheduled or promoted louder (maybe it already is and I don't know) that helps too. Just kinda wanted to say a lot can be done on the word-of-mouth growth alone.
Killua Jun 20, 2016 @ 5:30am 
I saw CrossCode and played the demo a few months back. I like it, a lot. I told my friends about it too, they also approve. But unfourtunatley myself and them are jaded with buying early access games that never get finished. That being said, I always wait for the full release or at least until it's a stage where the storyline is complete and the final polish is all that remains.
Last edited by Killua; Jun 20, 2016 @ 5:33am
Shadowfury Jun 20, 2016 @ 10:39am 
Once the game is finished it will become much more popular than now, no doubt about it.
Thamadman Jun 21, 2016 @ 8:32am 
People tend to stay away from early access games,since most of them are left unfinished,that being said im one of those people who never buys early access stuff,but i bought this game from the moment it came on steam because i found it really enjoyable.

I usally come back to start a new game every 2-3 patches,i dont really want to use the pre-saves, since i like the grindy part of the game as well as exploring the earlier areas again for new stuff.

So in conclusion i knew what i was getting when i bought this on day 1 but it hasn't proved my judgement wrong yet and i doubt it ever will.
Last edited by Thamadman; Jun 21, 2016 @ 8:34am
Shadowfury Jun 21, 2016 @ 9:20am 
Originally posted by Thamadman:
People tend to stay away from early access games,since most of them are left unfinished

Wait, what? Really? All the ones I've followed that started in early access ended up pretty well.
Darth Revan Jun 21, 2016 @ 9:25am 
Originally posted by lachsen:
Yeah, that is always the big question. Marketing is difficult and it's not enough to just create a good game - you also need to put in a lot of effort to promote it.

We tried really hard to promote the game during the Indiegogo campaign - it was just barely enough to reach our funding goal.

Now we focus in development and don't really do a lot of work to promote CrossCode. We just try to stay in touch with the community. This will of course change when we are close to the release.

So yeah, on the one hand it's a lack of effort to promote the game at the moment. But maybe it's something else as well.

I always have the theory, that CrossCode doesn't really have the "best first impression". That means it may not look quite as good as it feels when you actually play it. It may also be related to the fact that the graphics style of CrossCode is very RPG-Maker like, which isn't all that popular among many people. All of that makes it harder to promote the game.

Some things we are currently working on, hoping to improve the first impression a bit:
1. Reworking character portraits and other large scale character sprites within the game
2. Create new promotion graphics (e.g. poster, Steam banners) - this is currently still WIP
3. Creating a new trailer showing new content with a focus on the new boss fights etc.

I actually would be very curious what your first impression was on CrossCode. Have you been surprised when you played the game in compared to what you saw on the videos/screenshots? Any ideas on how we could better promote the game? Any feedback would be very helpful for us.

Actually there was dude in France hwo made the promotion for you, but still the name is not helping, naming the game cross_code, is like naming it banana when you browe Cross_code on google you find page of cheat code.... If the game was named bannana you would find image of banana browsing the name of the game.
Ernsteen Jun 21, 2016 @ 11:28am 
^ Both "cross code" and "crosscode" (as it is actually called) give me only results related to the game. So I don't see a problem with the name, it's short, pregnant and not to confuse with anything else.

I've said it somewhere else: I think CrossCode just lacks a unique selling point other than just being an excellent game. MN9 sold on the premise of being a Mega Man clone without being good. Many games like that got kickstarted around and after CrossCode's crowdfunder. And other games like Hyper Light Drifter or Cuphead generate all of their interest with their visuals alone.

CrossCode has no name, no outstanding element and no loved game it tries to revive.
It's just trying to be the best game it can, but which game doesn't? Most games sell by what they try to achieve, not whst they actually do.
Wig Bang Jun 24, 2016 @ 1:18am 
Correct. It's not enough to just make a good game. And for that reason, you guys NEED to put more effort into marketing.

There is a well defined PR loop that game developers use. It involves several social networks and other venues and looping through regularly and making sure none of them fall behind. Blogs/tigsource/crowdfund/facebook/twitter/main website/steam/etc.

You will lose a lot of $ if you don't take this extremely seriously at least 6 months before completion.
Last edited by Wig Bang; Jun 24, 2016 @ 1:18am
KOS-MOS Jun 29, 2016 @ 11:42pm 
i really love this game alot >.< can't wait for the full release :cinnamon: i invited some friends to your CrossCode steam group aswell, hopefully it gets more exposure in the future! this game deserves it.
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CrossCode > General Discussions > Topic Details