Dogs of War Online - Beta

Dogs of War Online - Beta

View Stats:
This topic has been locked
ChillQuill Nov 18, 2013 @ 2:24pm
Beware: There are no dogs in this game
Before you buy be warned that the title of this game is lying.
< >
Showing 1-3 of 3 comments
Fera Nov 19, 2013 @ 12:45pm 
Seriously?!
Do try to educate yourself before you open your mouth.

In English, the dogs of war is a phrase from Act 3, Scene 1, line 273 of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar: "Cry 'Havoc!', and let slip the dogs of war". Dog has its ordinary meaning; havoc is a military order permitting the seizure of spoil after a victory and let slip is to release from the leash.

Among scholars of English literature, however, the consensus is that Mark Antony's "the dogs of war" does not literally refer to dogs, but figuratively to the wild pack of soldiers "unleashed" by the commander's order to wreak "general havoc", i.e.,♥♥♥♥♥♥ pillage, and plunder.
AmphR Nov 19, 2013 @ 1:15pm 
Originally posted by DigitalFusion:
Seriously?!
Do try to educate yourself before you open your mouth.

In English, the dogs of war is a phrase from Act 3, Scene 1, line 273 of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar: "Cry 'Havoc!', and let slip the dogs of war". Dog has its ordinary meaning; havoc is a military order permitting the seizure of spoil after a victory and let slip is to release from the leash.

Among scholars of English literature, however, the consensus is that Mark Antony's "the dogs of war" does not literally refer to dogs, but figuratively to the wild pack of soldiers "unleashed" by the commander's order to wreak "general havoc", i.e.,♥♥♥♥♥♥ pillage, and plunder.

You have been trolled.
ChillQuill Nov 19, 2013 @ 3:16pm 
Originally posted by DigitalFusion:
Seriously?!
Do try to educate yourself before you open your mouth.

In English, the dogs of war is a phrase from Act 3, Scene 1, line 273 of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar: "Cry 'Havoc!', and let slip the dogs of war". Dog has its ordinary meaning; havoc is a military order permitting the seizure of spoil after a victory and let slip is to release from the leash.

Among scholars of English literature, however, the consensus is that Mark Antony's "the dogs of war" does not literally refer to dogs, but figuratively to the wild pack of soldiers "unleashed" by the commander's order to wreak "general havoc", i.e.,♥♥♥♥♥♥ pillage, and plunder.

Sorry but there is no worthy explanation as to why a game's title would lie like this.
< >
Showing 1-3 of 3 comments
Per page: 15 30 50

Date Posted: Nov 18, 2013 @ 2:24pm
Posts: 3