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bob18ca Nov 22, 2012 @ 3:40pm
Do you have to be in the top 100 to be Greenlighted?
Hey just wondering if anybody knows if your game has to be in the top 100 to be greenlighted. Greenlight is getting very saturated now and I think it can be hard for the new guys. How do you catch up to games that have been collecting votes for months before you. Potential can be viewed on how well a game was recieved by the community when it was being showcased for the first week and a half, no? Otherwise top 100 is mostly games that have some other following via kickstarter or youtube base. Just wondering I guess if Steam is keeping an eye on any of the projects that didn't reach top 100......
Showing 1-15 of 31 comments
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jeslyck Nov 22, 2012 @ 5:56pm 
Simple answer Steam is not a charity organization it is a company.
Last edited by jeslyck; Nov 24, 2012 @ 2:27am
Kristoffer Nov 22, 2012 @ 6:47pm 
Your reply didn't make any sense.

And from what we've seen, no. A couple of games were greenlighted almost right off the bat, long before they had any time to garner enough votes to bust the top 100.
Pinballwiz45b Nov 22, 2012 @ 7:07pm 
Top 100? Most likely not, unless they decide to up the amount of games greenlit from the Top 10 to the Top whatever it is, like what they did last month. Not sure if they'll do a full 100 from the rankings.
Last edited by Pinballwiz45b; Nov 22, 2012 @ 9:20pm
wilco64256 Nov 22, 2012 @ 7:34pm 
The top 100 is the list of games that is currently the most popular. Votes = popularity. Popularity = sales. Why would Valve *not* want to put the most popular games into the store?
bob18ca Nov 22, 2012 @ 9:40pm 
Well the point I was trying to make is that some of the top 100 have a fanbase already from some other means. So even though they have more votes, they also have way more views. So a game with less views could actually have a higher vote-per-view ratio. I dunno, makes sense to me.
wilco64256 Nov 22, 2012 @ 9:48pm 
Pre-existing fanbase = more sales. When you look at it from Valve's business perspective it makes plenty of sense to Greenlight something that already has an existing fanbase ready to buy the game than to Greenlight something that people never heard about until it hit Greenlight.
bob18ca Nov 22, 2012 @ 9:57pm 
Yeah, thats a good point. Guess everyones gotta hussle to get there game out there. Youtube videos or whatever.
AusSkiller Nov 23, 2012 @ 5:11am 
Originally posted by POSwilco64256:
Why would Valve *not* want to put the most popular games into the store?
If the top 100 games were all first person shooters they would stand to make more money by grabbing a few of the best of those and then going outside the top 100 to get games from different genres. A more diverse selection of games will have a larger market to sell to and because most people will run out of cash from buying just a few games it means you aren't as likely to lose as many potential sales because the market is out of money.

For example, if you have a market of 75 people that like first person shooters, 10 people that like RTS, 10 that like platformers, 5 that like racing games then it's likely that of 800 games the top 100 will be mostly if not exclusively FPS games because they have a number of fans that greatly outnumber fans of the other genres. So if you took 10 games only from that top 100 they would all almost certainly be FPS games, but if you are selling 10 FPS games then it's likely that 75 people will buy 2-4 games which averages out to roughly only 225 sales. But in the same market you sell 5 FPS games, 2 RTS games, 2 platformers and a racing game you could still be selling 2-4 games to the each of the 75 FPS fans, but you'll also be able to sell 1-2 RTS games to each of the 10 RTS fans, 1-2 platerformers to each of the 10 platformer fans and a game to each of the 5 racing fans so you could be getting 25-45 more game sales by selling less popular games too.

So if all the most popular games are too similar Valve is likely to want to look at greenlighting less popular games that are different because they can be sold to different customers, though they are probably going to be the most popular of their type so I guess technically they could still be called "the most popular games" ;).
Last edited by AusSkiller; Nov 23, 2012 @ 5:15am
OddConfection Nov 23, 2012 @ 8:05am 
Originally posted by bob18ca:
just wondering if anybody knows if your game has to be in the top 100 to be greenlighted.

Top 10 to 20 if you want to be greenlit in the next batch, at least that's how it's worked so far, as they've definitely taken the top ranked games.

Proof? A game I worked on was ranked 33rd from early on, they greenlit 10 games, we moved up to 23rd, they greenlit another 21 games, we moved up to 2nd, so will hopefully be greenlit in the next batch of games.

We did a bit of promotion to get there - YouTube videos, interviews, press releases, directing fans from our website, etc - but the majority of votes came from people just finding our game on Greenlight themselves and liking it. If you have a decent quality game, it will get votes, PR helps but won't be enough on it's own.

If you're out of Top 100 you're not likely to be greenlit any time soon but if you do make it into the Top 100 you'll be greenlit eventually as the games ahead of you make it on.



C0untzer0 Nov 23, 2012 @ 8:48am 
Here's a thing:
You can't upvote a game more than once.
Most people vote on a game in the first few days or not at all.
As people near the top of the pile can be overtaken rapidly by new games, I don't see how a game gains any advantage from being on Greenlight for months.
They DO gain votes from having work done on them.
RPGCreations Nov 23, 2012 @ 8:52am 
one thing to realize is that games in the top 100 are greenlit, they will make room for new games to join the top 100.
Skoardy Nov 23, 2012 @ 3:05pm 
Originally posted by AusSkiller:
So if all the most popular games are too similar Valve is likely to want to look at greenlighting less popular games that are different because they can be sold to different customers, though they are probably going to be the most popular of their type so I guess technically they could still be called "the most popular games" ;).
So when people have the money to get round to buying more games, they're suddenly going to have a hankering for less popular games rather than the popular ones they voted for? You seem to be implying that the people who have voted for the less popular games aren't the same pool of people voting for popular games or do people only like one genre of game in this scenario?
AusSkiller Nov 23, 2012 @ 3:58pm 
Originally posted by Skoardy:
So when people have the money to get round to buying more games, they're suddenly going to have a hankering for less popular games rather than the popular ones they voted for?
No, they'll buy they ones they voted for, but you'll find far more people didn't vote for the popular game than those that did (at least that's how it was when we could see those stats) and it's likely that it's because they like something different that may not be as popular. In order to sell to the people who didn't vote for the popular game you need to be selling the less popular games that they might prefer.

Originally posted by Skoardy:
You seem to be implying that the people who have voted for the less popular games aren't the same pool of people voting for popular games or do people only like one genre of game in this scenario?
Yeah, in my example I was using "people" who only like one genre, obviously in reality there's a lot of overlap with people buying games from many genres, but because not everyone likes the same thing there will always be people who do not like the popular games. Take McPixel for instance, a popular game but many people also hated it with a passion, if you were only selling McPixel type games then you wouldn't get any sales from the people that hate McPixel, but if you also sell something completely different but that's not as popular you might be able to sell that to some of those people to get their money as well as the money you'd get from McPixel fans.


The main flaw with my example that I should probably bring up is that the most popular games are relatively diverse already, so Valve already get a decent mix from the top 10, but I'm sure that on occasion they'll look further down the list to find something in an area that is being under represented on Steam in order to sell more games to the people that like particular niche.
Skoardy Nov 24, 2012 @ 8:01am 
Originally posted by AusSkiller:
No, they'll buy they ones they voted for, but you'll find far more people didn't vote for the popular game than those that did (at least that's how it was when we could see those stats) and it's likely that it's because they like something different that may not be as popular. In order to sell to the people who didn't vote for the popular game you need to be selling the less popular games that they might prefer.
But due to overlap, you'll find even more people spread around the other next most popular games than you would on a niche title that hadn't got enough vote to make it itself.

You have to remember that the sampling of votes are going to be a fair representation of the rest of Steam's customers so it's always going to be the safest bet (the one that brings Valve the most money) to pick only the top ranked games. Yes, they may be interested in the niche games but more of them are going to be buying the top ranked titles.
AusSkiller Nov 24, 2012 @ 3:57pm 
Originally posted by Skoardy:
But due to overlap, you'll find even more people spread around the other next most popular games than you would on a niche title that hadn't got enough vote to make it itself.
Only if they have the money, which is my point, typically there's a lot of overlap with the popular games, people who like the popular games are going to like many of the other popular games so they are likely to run out of money before they can buy them all. There's less overlap of the market for niche games and the popular games though, so selling a few niche games will bring in some money from people who may not have spent all their money on the popular games because they aren't as interested in them.

Originally posted by Skoardy:
You have to remember that the sampling of votes are going to be a fair representation of the rest of Steam's customers so it's always going to be the safest bet (the one that brings Valve the most money) to pick only the top ranked games.
I agree with that, but they could do better by occasionally picking the highest ranked game in specific niche/genre that they don't have many games from even if it's actually a lower ranked game, and they've already done it once or twice by the sounds of it (though I could be wrong on that). Obviously most of the games should be the top ranked ones though. Think of Steam like a drinks vending machine, many of the buttons are likely to be for coke (popular) but there will still be a few buttons for other drinks (niche) because it means they can sell to a larger market and make more money.

Originally posted by Skoardy:
Yes, they may be interested in the niche games but more of them are going to be buying the top ranked titles.
Again customers have a finite amount of money, if you over saturate just the popular games then you end up making less money because people who want the popular games will be unable to buy them all anyway. If you only release enough popular games that you are just barely releasing more games than people can afford and also a couple of niche games you can make more money because your market is much larger.
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Date Posted: Nov 22, 2012 @ 3:40pm
Posts: 31