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umd plz common app Nov 5, 2012 @ 8:03pm
Picking an Engine
I am fairly new to game development however I am trying to pick it up as I have a few ideas I wish to create (most of which are small and simply for my own amusement). However, I have had difficulties in selecting an engine to dedicate myself to.

I have looked mostly at Unreal and Unity however I have looked a little bit at Source as well. I like Unity as it has a very easy to use interface, however I feel the UDK has better built-in graphics and an equally good interface. (I haven't tried Unity 4 however). Since I am new however, I do not want to commit to buying the Unreal Engine and discover I cannot handle its programming style. I like the idea of Source, as it provides neccessities and I do not have to worry about licensing until I am ready to ship the game. I have heard however that Source's editing tools are out of date and the engine is becoming outdated as well.

I am sorry if I should be taking these questions elsewhere, but I felt I could get some help from Greenlight's community.

Thanks!
Showing 1-11 of 11 comments
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DarkByNight Nov 5, 2012 @ 8:19pm 
So with your post I am assuming you have never programmed before, but want to make 3D games? Unity engine is not a bad place to start, although you should try to learn as much about programming before starting making full fledged games.
In programming we usually advice people to begin by programming stuff like tetris and breakout and such since it gives you the foundation you need to create more advanced stuff.
As much as it would be awesome, you can not start out making large 3D games. First you learn the fundamentals.
You could go a few routes. You could start with a game engine like Unity or UDK, which are mostly suited towards 3D development, and has an incredibly hefty price tag if you want the PRO edition. The scripting languages are javascript and C# for Unity. Not sure about UDK.
If you are going to focus on 2D development, you could take a look at GameMaker: Studio which is available here on Steam.
Finally, if you want to get down and dirty with programming, I can recommend Darkbasic Pro, which is pure programming but has a learning curve suited for beginners who still want to focus on game development.

Finally, not sure this should be on greenlight but I wanted to answer your question either way.
Last edited by DarkByNight; Nov 6, 2012 @ 1:55am
C0untzer0 Nov 6, 2012 @ 1:23am 
^ All of that ^
umd plz common app Nov 6, 2012 @ 6:22am 
Originally posted by DarkByNight:
So with your post I am assuming you have never programmed before, but want to make 3D games? Unity engine is not a bad place to start, although you should try to learn as much about programming before starting making full fledged games.
In programming we usually advice people to begin by programming stuff like tetris and breakout and such since it gives you the foundation you need to create more advanced stuff.
As much as it would be awesome, you can not start out making large 3D games. First you learn the fundamentals.
You could go a few routes. You could start with a game engine like Unity or UDK, which are mostly suited towards 3D development, and has an incredibly hefty price tag if you want the PRO edition. The scripting languages are javascript and C# for Unity. Not sure about UDK.
If you are going to focus on 2D development, you could take a look at GameMaker: Studio which is available here on Steam.
Finally, if you want to get down and dirty with programming, I can recommend Darkbasic Pro, which is pure programming but has a learning curve suited for beginners who still want to focus on game development.

Finally, not sure this should be on greenlight but I wanted to answer your question either way.

Ah thank you.

I have done Java and web languages in the past but that's about it.

Thanks for the help!
FRAUKOUJIRO Nov 6, 2012 @ 6:31am 
Originally posted by Puppier:
Originally posted by DarkByNight:
So with your post I am assuming you have never programmed before, but want to make 3D games? Unity engine is not a bad place to start, although you should try to learn as much about programming before starting making full fledged games.
In programming we usually advice people to begin by programming stuff like tetris and breakout and such since it gives you the foundation you need to create more advanced stuff.
As much as it would be awesome, you can not start out making large 3D games. First you learn the fundamentals.
You could go a few routes. You could start with a game engine like Unity or UDK, which are mostly suited towards 3D development, and has an incredibly hefty price tag if you want the PRO edition. The scripting languages are javascript and C# for Unity. Not sure about UDK.
If you are going to focus on 2D development, you could take a look at GameMaker: Studio which is available here on Steam.
Finally, if you want to get down and dirty with programming, I can recommend Darkbasic Pro, which is pure programming but has a learning curve suited for beginners who still want to focus on game development.

Finally, not sure this should be on greenlight but I wanted to answer your question either way.

Ah thank you.

I have done Java and web languages in the past but that's about it.

Thanks for the help!

If you've done Java and web languages, I'd recommend checking out Unity then. You can do much of the in-game scripting with what essentially amounts to Javascript and it's all heavily documented.[docs.unity3d.com]
umd plz common app Nov 6, 2012 @ 8:13am 
Originally posted by Mindwedge:
Originally posted by Puppier:
Since I am new however, I do not want to commit to buying the Unreal Engine and discover I cannot handle its programming style.

Unity free is a place to start. You can download that right now. It lacks some of the features of Unity Pro, but you'll get your feet wet with only a time investment. Basic assets can be purchased for you to use in the Unity store, but what about creating your own game assets?

I saw your other post suggesting that you don't have some of the other tools you'll need like Photoshop. You should consider making a list of the tools you'll need, as it hardly ends there. You'll need 3D software unless you're doing a 2D game, and some sound/music creation and processing software too at a minimum. Make a budget and a plan for how and when you'll purchase the licenses for these. I wouldn't scrimp on Photoshop or 3D software either. Gimp and Blender may save you money, but they may bury you in hours. You might get by with Photoshop essentials and upgrade later.

Some of these issues can be mitigated if you start or join a team. Codies have slightly less of the software cost issues artists have. But if you're starting your own team or working alone, you'll need to pony up for software licenses. Make sure you understand the EULAs. A "seat" is just that - one license per person, not one license for all to use.

Bottom line is that indie development may be less expensive, but it's by no means free. Even with basic free or nearly free tools, you will be investing your time and there's a tradeoff between that time and the quality of your tools.

Thanks for the advice! Thankfully, I am a student so I can still get student discounts but I should write out a budget.
AusSkiller Nov 6, 2012 @ 9:37am 
If you don't have much experience with unmanaged languages like C/C++ then Unity is pretty much the best option for you. Most engines use C++ for the majority of the game code and C++ is an unmanaged language which means you need to manage the memory yourself, it's far more powerful and very useful for games which tend to be very memory intensive but it also requires many years of experience to get right because it only takes a few small mistakes to start running out of RAM or causing fatal errors. Unity uses C# which is a managed language so you don't need to worry as much about allocating and freeing memory which can make development much easier for most people (though personally I find it a nightmare after having used C++).

However you shouldn't worry about using Unity over other engines, from what I've seen it's a very good engine and almost certainly better than the others for beginners. There is one thing you should be aware of though, most engines are geared towards first person shooters so if you aren't making a first person shooter you could be in for a fair bit of extra work to get the engine to do something different.

Originally posted by Puppier:
Thanks for the advice! Thankfully, I am a student so I can still get student discounts but I should write out a budget.
Be VERY careful buying any software at student prices, often the licenses stipulate it can only be used for non-commercial use and are often only valid while you are a student, so when you finish your education you have to buy it all over again at full price which ends up making it more expensive than just buying at full price in the first place.
umd plz common app Nov 6, 2012 @ 9:39am 
Originally posted by AusSkiller:
If you don't have much experience with unmanaged languages like C/C++ then Unity is pretty much the best option for you. Most engines use C++ for the majority of the game code and C++ is an unmanaged language which means you need to manage the memory yourself, it's far more powerful and very useful for games which tend to be very memory intensive but it also requires many years of experience to get right because it only takes a few small mistakes to start running out of RAM or causing fatal errors. Unity uses C# which is a managed language so you don't need to worry as much about allocating and freeing memory which can make development much easier for most people (though personally I find it a nightmare after having used C++).

However you shouldn't worry about using Unity over other engines, from what I've seen it's a very good engine and almost certainly better than the others for beginners. There is one thing you should be aware of though, most engines are geared towards first person shooters so if you aren't making a first person shooter you could be in for a fair bit of extra work to get the engine to do something different.

Originally posted by Puppier:
Thanks for the advice! Thankfully, I am a student so I can still get student discounts but I should write out a budget.
Be VERY careful buying any software at student prices, often the licenses stipulate it can only be used for non-commercial use and are often only valid while you are a student, so when you finish your education you have to buy it all over again at full price which ends up making it more expensive than just buying at full price in the first place.

Thanks! Also, thanks for the warning, that hadn't crossed my mind.
.!.oO=Boney-Dog-Lee=Oo.!. Nov 6, 2012 @ 10:46am 
Hey,
we have a few engines listed here for anyone to check out:

http://steamcommunity.com/groups/dev-zoo/discussions/0/864946409148922604/

BadManDemIsFearMe Jan 28, 2013 @ 6:26am 
try http://www.beatzmaker.co.uk for free music creation software
Skoardy Jan 28, 2013 @ 8:25am 
Nice necroing of a thread just to post your off-topic website advert.
Chaotic Kitten Jan 28, 2013 @ 9:43am 
I know it's a dead post, but you can make 2D games in Unity3D, it's fairly simple, and gives you lots of flexibility in design. It's what we used to make our 2D game Tiny Plumbers. As for cost, you can get the indie version of Unity for free, it just has some limitations, etc. We only recently upgraded to UnityPro for our newest game Legend of Dungeon
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Date Posted: Nov 5, 2012 @ 8:03pm
Posts: 11