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Genebris Sep 25, 2013 @ 9:23pm
Can you publish a game in Greenlight that uses free models made by other people?
Can you publish your game in Greenlight if it uses free models that can be found everywhere on the internet?
Showing 1-15 of 15 comments
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Thordred Sep 25, 2013 @ 9:50pm 
inb4
Go contact the game developer and suggest that they submit their game for consideration.
Pantheon Sep 25, 2013 @ 11:52pm 
Originally posted by Thordred:
inb4
Go contact the game developer and suggest that they submit their game for consideration.
:happymeat:
How is this relevant to this topic?

@OP
I doubt most people are willing to let them use their work for commercial products if you aren't willing to share the revenue with them or something like that.
But I guess it depends under what conditions you can use those models. Normally you should find information on conditions on the specific sites.
Not sure if it's a good idea to use other people's work for your own commercial game though, unless it was made specifically for you.
C0untzer0 Sep 26, 2013 @ 12:03am 
You know that EULA you didn't read before clicking "Yes"? Read it.
Genebris Sep 26, 2013 @ 12:16am 
Originally posted by Pantheon:
I doubt most people are willing to let them use their work for commercial products if you aren't willing to share the revenue with them or something like that.
But I guess it depends under what conditions you can use those models. Normally you should find information on conditions on the specific sites.
Not sure if it's a good idea to use other people's work for your own commercial game though, unless it was made specifically for you.
Thanks.
.!.oO=Boney-Dog-Lee=Oo.!. Sep 26, 2013 @ 1:30am 
Like it has been said 'free to use' does not necessarily cover commercial use. There are a few licences (Like some MIT and Creative Commons) that permit commercial use, some require mentioning of the source author, some don't. Best to ask the authors if you can't look it up. Have fun!

I guess you should be fine for prototypes, but I also would not recommend using 'open source' models in a final product. Especially 3D assets should be created and optimised for their specific use.
Gorlom[Swe] Sep 26, 2013 @ 1:36am 
If you can it will probably still not be that well recieved from the public. You should try to hire someone to do moddeling and stuff for you imo. (make sure you have a contract that says you own the work you paid the guy/girl to do.)
Parody Games Sep 26, 2013 @ 4:25am 
It depends if you intend to try to sell the game, or give it away as well. There are some items that are free for all purposes, but fair odds most of the items that your talking about aren't intended for commercial use.
Genebris Sep 26, 2013 @ 4:28am 
But publishing it as free is fine, right?
C0untzer0 Sep 26, 2013 @ 4:35am 
If only they sent you some kind of legal definition of your rights for using them which you could read instead of just scrolling past and clicking "OK" you'd have your answer.
AusSkiller Sep 26, 2013 @ 5:43am 
Originally posted by Genebris:
But publishing it as free is fine, right?
Not always, sometimes there are limits and restriction on how you distribute such assets or the quantity you can distribute even for non-commercial use. As C0untzer0 suggests, you should read all the agreements for each of the assets you are thinking of using, and I mean ALL of them, sometimes they may appear to be the same but it only takes a single small clause to make what you are doing a violation of the terms and leave you liable to litigation from the owners of the assets.

"Free" assets can be good but you really do need to keep track of all the licenses properly and make sure you are complying with all the conditions if you intend to use them, and that can be a huge time sink if you aren't fluent in legalese. It can be especially time consuming if there are also different conditions of use for each asset, for instance a lot of agreements state that you need to include the license with the distribution, but sometimes they specify it needs to appear in the credits, other times it can just be in a text file, and yet others need it to be displayed in a splash screen or front end tool prior to the asset being used.

There are some pretty unexpected conditions out there, I was once interested in using a font but upon reading the agreement I discovered that while I was free to use the font for any purpose including commercial use I wasn't actually allowed to distribute the font at all which meant I couldn't package it up along with my game so even with a commercial license I couldn't actually use the font the way I needed to.
Last edited by AusSkiller; Sep 26, 2013 @ 5:49am
Genebris Sep 26, 2013 @ 5:46am 
Thanks.
CodeBattleSeraph Sep 27, 2013 @ 5:44pm 
listen to the first answer by thordred
-Z- Sep 27, 2013 @ 6:12pm 
Originally posted by CodeBattleSeraph:
listen to the first answer by thordred
The one that had absolutely nothing to do with the topic?
CodeBattleSeraph Oct 3, 2013 @ 1:54am 
Originally posted by -Z-:
Originally posted by CodeBattleSeraph:
listen to the first answer by thordred
The one that had absolutely nothing to do with the topic?
CodeBattleSeraph Oct 3, 2013 @ 1:55am 
that wasnt with the topic
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Date Posted: Sep 25, 2013 @ 9:23pm
Posts: 15