Steam Greenlight

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L-r | Canti Aug 17, 2013 @ 4:18am
"Would you buy this?" is a dumb question
The question should be more along the lines of "Would you like to see this game on Steam?"

I can't give an answer to whether I would buy a game or not until I see the price.
Showing 1-15 of 44 comments
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A Gelatinous Cube-Z- Aug 17, 2013 @ 4:20am 
Except that "Would you buy this?" without the inclusion of a price indicates that you could wait for a sale to adjust the price to something you'd agree with, but that they still want to know if you'd buy the game and not simply think it should be on Steam.
L-r | Canti Aug 17, 2013 @ 4:21am 
I'd buy every game if it were cheap enough, that's the issue.
A Gelatinous Cube-Z- Aug 17, 2013 @ 4:22am 
The issue with your issue is that what you think is cheap enough would very likely not be enough to make up the cost of development and living expenses for the developers.
L-r | Canti Aug 17, 2013 @ 4:25am 
Maybe wrong choice of words when I say cheap.

Essentially, when buying a game, price is a huge factor. I could vote "Yes" to many games assuming they price them at what I consider to be appropriate, but there's no way to know what the price is going to be so I end up clicking Yes to most things I see.
A Gelatinous Cube-Z- Aug 17, 2013 @ 4:28am 
And what is your thought on the pricing of games that have passed through Greenlight thus far? Appropriate or unreasonable?
Skoardy Aug 17, 2013 @ 4:34am 
Try asking the dev what they'd likely price their game at if you feel you can't possibly vote without that information. Chances are, most would be willing to speculate.

But asking people if they'd want to see a game on Steam is too vague to be worthwhile data for Valve. You already have idiots who pity vote games or use the "I wouldn't buy/play it but someone else probably would... Upvote!" mantra of morons. Asking an even less specific question could only make that situation worse.
L-r | Canti Aug 17, 2013 @ 4:37am 
Originally posted by -Z-:
And what is your thought on the pricing of games that have passed through Greenlight thus far? Appropriate or unreasonable?
Mostly appropriate, some not so much like Leisure Suit Larry. I voted yes on that under the assumption that it would retail for maybe £6-8, not £15.

I like that it got its remake onto Steam, but I wouldn't have said yes to the question "Would you buy it if it got onto Steam?" if I'd known the price. That's why I think the wording of the question should be changed.

Originally posted by Skoardy:
But asking people if they'd want to see a game on Steam is too vague to be worthwhile data for Valve.
I hardly think the current data is worthwhile anyway. I could say yes to something now, but when it eventually releases and I'm in a financially restrictive month and it debuted at more than twice the amount of money I was expecting it to cost, that data they collected becomes meaningless.
A Gelatinous Cube-Z- Aug 17, 2013 @ 4:38am 
Originally posted by Canti:
Originally posted by -Z-:
And what is your thought on the pricing of games that have passed through Greenlight thus far? Appropriate or unreasonable?
Mostly appropriate, some not so much like Leisure Suit Larry. I voted yes on that under the assumption that it would retail for maybe £6-8, not £15.

I like that it got its remake onto Steam, but I wouldn't have said yes to the question "Would you buy it if it got onto Steam?" if I'd known the price. That's why I think the wording of the question should be changed.
So then would you buy it if it went on a 50% off sale?
L-r | Canti Aug 17, 2013 @ 4:41am 
Yes, but again that could be applied to any game. "Yes if the price is low enough" would be my answer to anything, so in theory I could just vote yes on everything.
Skoardy Aug 17, 2013 @ 4:43am 
Originally posted by Canti:
I hardly think the current data is worthwhile anyway. I could say yes to something now, but when it eventually releases and I'm in a financially restrictive month and it debuted at more than twice the amount of money I was expecting it to cost, that data they collected becomes meaningless.
More or less meaningless than "Would you like to see this game on Steam?" because without any kind of intent to buy (now or in the future when money is available or the price is right), I see a massive gulf of worth between those two questions. Even people with absolutely no intent to purchase a game ever could honestly answer that question in the positive. You might as well just spin a wheel and Greenlight whatever comes up the winner.
A Gelatinous Cube-Z- Aug 17, 2013 @ 4:45am 
Originally posted by Canti:
Yes, but again that could be applied to any game. "Yes if the price is low enough" would be my answer to anything, so in theory I could just vote yes on everything.
In which case, you might as well not vote at all, as a yes on everything is a yes on nothing, due to the comparative nature of Greenlight's system.
Last edited by A Gelatinous Cube-Z-; Aug 17, 2013 @ 4:56am
Skoardy Aug 17, 2013 @ 4:45am 
Originally posted by Canti:
Yes, but again that could be applied to any game. "Yes if the price is low enough" would be my answer to anything, so in theory I could just vote yes on everything.
I think Valve are also assuming that you're applying some kind of personal standards to what you buy and not just hoovering games up like it's somekind of Pokemon variant.
Gorlom[Swe] Aug 17, 2013 @ 5:25am 
Originally posted by Canti:
Maybe wrong choice of words when I say cheap.

Essentially, when buying a game, price is a huge factor. I could vote "Yes" to many games assuming they price them at what I consider to be appropriate, but there's no way to know what the price is going to be so I end up clicking Yes to most things I see.
In that case you should be clicking yes and not bother with the price.

Asking people if they think the game should be on steam gives Valve worthless/errorous/misleading data.
They (Valve) are interested in how many people would want to buy it (assuming the price would be in their price range), not in how many people think "oh this might be fun for others. I personally don't have any interest in it but I'll be a swell guy and vote for it anyway (and in doing so shaftinhg other projects and not being a very swell guy at all)".
Originally posted by Canti:
Originally posted by -Z-:
And what is your thought on the pricing of games that have passed through Greenlight thus far? Appropriate or unreasonable?
Mostly appropriate, some not so much like Leisure Suit Larry. I voted yes on that under the assumption that it would retail for maybe £6-8, not £15.

I like that it got its remake onto Steam, but I wouldn't have said yes to the question "Would you buy it if it got onto Steam?" if I'd known the price. That's why I think the wording of the question should be changed.
You're not forced to buy it. Do you really feel regret voting ofr it? Some kind of buyers remorse without actually buying it?

Originally posted by Canti:
I hardly think the current data is worthwhile anyway. I could say yes to something now, but when it eventually releases and I'm in a financially restrictive month and it debuted at more than twice the amount of money I was expecting it to cost, that data they collected becomes meaningless.
Not really. It's a show of interest not a commitment to buy. The data is still valueble, a lot more valuable than "should this be on steam" data.

Originally posted by Canti:
Yes, but again that could be applied to any game. "Yes if the price is low enough" would be my answer to anything, so in theory I could just vote yes on everything.
If you are that indiscriminate with what you buy then go for it. It's pretty useless to vote on everything as Z says but hey if you like every genre and every playstyle, game mechanic, graphics etc then go for it.
First time I've seen someone who doesnt care which games comes out of greenlight but still votes. :D
Last edited by Gorlom[Swe]; Aug 17, 2013 @ 5:33am
C0untzer0 Aug 17, 2013 @ 5:51am 
"Would you buy it?" Is the ONLY question that matters. Steam is a service which sells games. Greenlight is a system for trying to decide which games will sell. The decision is pretty straightforward. If you would buy something at a given price, then you would buy it.
Sera Aug 17, 2013 @ 10:00am 
Yeah. "Would you buy this game?" is only a wild shot at someone's opinions about a game. No one says the person who said yes really buy said game when it's released. I know I voted yes on many games I thought awesome but I could as well change mind when it's released.

If everyone who said yes on a game suddenly decided to give up buying the game when it is released, the whole idea of the question would be nothing but a flaw. Same with what I said before. If everyone who said no on a game suddenly decided to buy the game (elsewhere, thanks to Greenlight's "take a guess"' system), it would also prove how wrong the system is.

And Mindwedge, I would think PB does hurt the sales since... Well, being one who loves to wander on that website to see the popular choices and read the comments of people, it's clear that a lot of piracy is going on as soon as a new game comes out and I am sure it doesn't quite help the developers make money from their own games.

Sadly, since Greenlight can't know 100% if you would buy it by reading one of your possible futures, the system will always be nothing but a wild shot system. Greenlight just can't and will never work as intended. Unless of course you pay for the game when you say yes so then we'd know you'd buy it. Since you paid for it... But the system will never work like that. Ever...
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Date Posted: Aug 17, 2013 @ 4:18am
Posts: 44