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sup_bro Jul 4, 2013 @ 9:34am
A couple questions from an inexperienced amateur dev
So I'm hoping to release something I'm building at the moment, however I use very simple software (Game Maker 7 pro) and hence I'm not happy with my creations' overall look (although I do still think the gameplay, concepts and fundamental aesthetic are still fun, interesting and usable).

I understand that Steam Greenlight may be too ambitious for a first step, especially for my age, but this seemed the friendliest and most reliable place to propose my ideas and questions :)

So I'm wondering: do I need to upgrade to more powerful development software, and perhaps learn a whole new programming language? Or could I find some kind of independent programmer willing to recreate something in a higher quality format? Can anyone reccomend better animation or sprite-editing programs? And how do I know if a game is well recieved or positively critiqued without going through lots of paperwork and the Steam £100 initial payment? All of this is new to me, and any answers at all are very much appreciated;
thank you so much for reading and many thanks in advance :p
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geezer1916 Jul 4, 2013 @ 10:44am 
the more you learn the better you will be at it. plus it will make your game better
the programs you need i dnt know about but money wise you could try kickstarter (its better if you have somethingto show).
Last edited by geezer1916; Jul 4, 2013 @ 10:46am
ND Jul 4, 2013 @ 11:17am 
It's not about the tools. It's about what you do with them. Some very successful games have been made with Game Maker (Gunpoint, Spelunky, Hotline Miami)...

If you want to test the water you could try posting in the Concept section first, which is free... but if you want to get feedback and improve your skills I would recommend the TIGSource community. You can always come back to Greenlight later when you feel you have a solid game.

Check this site for a list of good free and paid tools plus a ton of other great links:

http://www.pixelprospector.com/indie-resources/
Last edited by ND; Jul 4, 2013 @ 11:19am
sup_bro Jul 4, 2013 @ 11:19am 
Thanks, exactly what I was looking for :) I'll check those out
AusSkiller Jul 4, 2013 @ 1:00pm 
Originally posted by sup_bro:
So I'm wondering: do I need to upgrade to more powerful development software, and perhaps learn a whole new programming language?
You certainly don't need to, but often having more freedom with what you can do with your game can really help differentiate it from potential competitors.

Originally posted by sup_bro:
Or could I find some kind of independent programmer willing to recreate something in a higher quality format?
That's unlikely unless you can pay someone at least minimum wage for the duration of development, though if you have talents in art or bring some other valuable skill to the development and your idea is exceptional then you might be able to convince someone to profit share but it's not a common thing to happen unless you already know the programmer.

Originally posted by sup_bro:
Can anyone reccomend better animation or sprite-editing programs?
It mostly depends on the artist's preference, typically photoshop is the tool of choice but GIMP is a free alternative if you can't afford it. There aren't really many specific sprite editing tools because almost any 2D image editor is suitable for the job, the quality of the sprites is much more dependent on the skill of the artist.

Originally posted by sup_bro:
And how do I know if a game is well recieved or positively critiqued without going through lots of paperwork and the Steam £100 initial payment?
As others suggested, the concepts section of greenlight or game development communities (preferably ones that are supportive of indie and hobby game projects) are good places to get some feedback.



Also be aware that if you want to sell the game on Steam or other large game distribution platform then you should probably seek legal advice before you actually release it (if you get through greenlight then I suspect Valve would probably be able to help you with that though) and you will probably also want to consider setting up a company to own the game so you are personally protected against litigation.
SatsumaBenji Jul 26, 2013 @ 8:07pm 
I'm not familiar with Game Maker, what's the main language are you using though (or combinations of .NET packages)?
Anything that's better than Java and you're doing good! (C/C++, C#, Pascal, Python, etc)
sup_bro Jul 28, 2013 @ 6:37am 
It's a specialised user-friendly language that the program's creator's developed: I use a built-in drag-and-drop interface in the program. Proably not better than Java :') haha
C0untzer0 Jul 28, 2013 @ 7:30am 
Nothing's better than Java, If you're a traffic light or a phone switch.
Although many things are contextually better or more apt in other situations.
irrevenant Jul 29, 2013 @ 1:10am 
Also, not saying you shouldn't go through Greenlight, but also have a look at selling through Desura. They specialise in smaller Indie games.
AusSkiller Jul 29, 2013 @ 7:33am 
Originally posted by C0untzer0:
Nothing's better than Java, If you're a traffic light or a phone switch.
Although many things are contextually better or more apt in other situations.
Don't get me started, the only thing Java has going for it is shorter development times with inexperienced programmers and a much shorter learning period, in almost every other way a combination of C, C++ and assembly is better. Java is just a cost cutting language, which is often a more important concern than the other aspects of a language when choosing what to develop in, but the language it's self is clearly inferior to C/C++/assembly as demonstrated by the need for JNI.

If cost is the main concern and performance isn't a big issue then sure Java is great, but without a cost constraint it couldn't compete with something that had been written in C/C++/assembly, so Java is not the better language, just the cheaper one.
Gorlom[Swe] Jul 29, 2013 @ 8:20am 
Originally posted by AusSkiller:
so Java is not the better language, just the cheaper one.
Compared to C/C++/Assembly. But which one is better when comparing Game maker and Java? (as that was the context that Java was brought up in before C0untzer0 mocked it)
AusSkiller Jul 29, 2013 @ 8:46am 
Originally posted by GorlomSwe:
Compared to C/C++/Assembly. But which one is better when comparing Game maker and Java? (as that was the context that Java was brought up in before C0untzer0 mocked it)
Ahh, I usually need quotes to pick up on context properly so I missed that. Yeah Java is by far the better of the two.
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Date Posted: Jul 4, 2013 @ 9:34am
Posts: 11