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jorg Feb 9, 2013 @ 3:23am
Suggestion: Focus on already released games
There are a lot of in development games with a release date in the far future lumped together with games that are finished and ready for distribution on Greenlight. Some of them even get greenlit, thus occupying a slot in the very small number of greenlit games every month, even tho they wont be on Steam for at least a year. Loot at sth like Dream. Yeah it looks cool, but it failed its kickstarter, and no one knows when it will be released. A game thats ready now could have been given the go ahead in its place, and Dream could have been greenlit when its ready in whenever. I understand that devs want to build awareness for their projects before release, and that they would like to know whether their game will be on Steam or not in advance, but I think giving people with already finished games a chance to distribute on Steam is slightly more important. There are great games being left out (how is Inquisitor or Pinball Arcade not on Steam is beyond me).

So here are some suggestions:

Separate in development games from games that are finished and already available elsewhere.

At least 7 of the 10 or so greenlit games every month should be finished.

If a game is not released within 6 months of being greenlit it should lose its spot. This is probably my most controversial suggestion, but it would discourage people from putting up their projects too early, promising the world without actually having any idea of when and how will they deliver, and taking away space from games that are already out there or at least closer to release. If their game is good, they can put it up when they are close to release, still get greenlit, and they would have lost nothing, but someone else gained a much needed spot earlier. In the meantime they can build hype elsewhere. Greenlight is not supposed to be simply an advertising board afterall, but also a gatekeeper of some sort.

edit: to add sth to the last part: this probably shouldn't concern games already greenlit, since it wouldn't be fair to them to change the rules afterwards, but games greenlit from now on.
Last edited by jorg; Feb 9, 2013 @ 3:55am
Showing 1-9 of 9 comments
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Skoardy Feb 9, 2013 @ 5:25am 
It'll certainly be a popular idea with the devs of less popular (but finished) games. I'm sure they'll leap on any unfair advantage they can get.

I don't think the six months thing is a good idea. You'll just end up with more people releasing early, unfinished games to beat losing their spot.
Gorlom[Swe] Feb 9, 2013 @ 6:25am 
I agree with Skoardy. That 6 month idea sounds horrible. Wouldn't it just be easier for Valve to greenlight an additional finished or nearly finished game, if they are greenlighting something that doesn't look like it is ready for another year?

Are you sure that the unfinished games are really taking up spots? That valve hasn't taken that into consideration?
Last edited by Gorlom[Swe]; Feb 9, 2013 @ 6:54am
jorg Feb 9, 2013 @ 7:31am 
Originally posted by Skoardy:
I don't think the six months thing is a good idea. You'll just end up with more people releasing early, unfinished games to beat losing their spot.

That would only happen if they put up their greenlight submissions too early, when even they don't know when they are going to release. I guess the point I'm trying to make is that there is no point putting up a greenlight page that early, and there is no point greenlighting them that far away from release. It wouldn't be a problem if Valve would let in more games, but since they give the greenlight to only about ten, if say 4 of the games is a year away, and there is no way to be sure they will even be released, then they only greenlit 6. Thats not much, and if one of those wont be released, then a slot was wasted.

If a game is close to complete, six months should be enough to fix bugs, add steamworks, build hype, figure out the pricing etc.

Also, I dont see any unfair advantage here, people with in development games would have the same chance to submit their games when they are ready or close to ready, and get the greenlight then (well, if this whole thing even exists a year from now...). They would lose nothing, and there is no point for a game to sit in the "greenlit" state for a year or more without a release...
Gorlom[Swe] Feb 9, 2013 @ 8:13am 
You're still telling devs they have to either rush their production (that's bad mmkay). What if they have some unforseen issues/deleys?

Wouldn't it be better to have 2 categories. 1 with ready to release games and 1 with still in production. Games in the later category doesn't take up slots in the former until they state that they are ready to be switched over to that category.

(and again: are you sure that games actually take up slots? What indications/proof do you have of that?)
C0untzer0 Feb 9, 2013 @ 8:46am 
It's not as if games that are already finished make it out quickly. Even games which were finished 30 YEARS ago aren't releasing a month after getting the Greenlight.
jorg Feb 9, 2013 @ 8:46am 
Originally posted by GorlomSwe:
You're still telling devs they have to either rush their production (that's bad mmkay). What if they have some unforseen issues/deleys?

No, I wouldn't, I would tell them to not even submit their game until its close to release (features locked, vast majority of content done, no gamebreaking bugs etc). Because frankly I dont see much point in having them greenlit earlier, especially in such an early stage as Dream when the funding is not even secured.


Originally posted by GorlomSwe:
Wouldn't it be better to have 2 categories. 1 with ready to release games and 1 with still in production. Games in the later category doesn't take up slots in the former until they state that they are ready to be switched over to that category.

Would work for me, as long as most of the games greenlit would be ready to release.

Originally posted by GorlomSwe:
(and again: are you sure that games actually take up slots? What indications/proof do you have of that?)

Every month there are about 10 games greenlit (I think there was 11 once), thats what I mean by slots. We've never seen significantly more than that. That is a quite small number, thats why i feel these places shouldn't be taken up by games that could easily be greenlit in 2014 and lose nothing because of it, because they won't even be released till then.
Last edited by jorg; Feb 9, 2013 @ 8:49am
lukep Feb 9, 2013 @ 9:25am 
A better solution (IMO) would be to not have "slots", and just greenlight all of the games that Valve wants. They would probably bias themselves towards finished games, and greenlighting one in development shouldn't prevent them from getting a finished game as well.

The main problem I see with my idea is that it opens them up to criticism in their choices, as choosing in 5 one month and 20 in another could be seen as a statement about their quality.
Skoardy Feb 9, 2013 @ 9:38am 
Since nobody knows how long their game will sit in Greenlight (I'm sure those submitting in September were really hoping to be voted through by now), it's a bit redundant to talk about 'too early'. Without throwing up exagerated figures, how long is too early when the duration spent in Greenlight is not a known, fixed period?

If a finished project sat waiting in Greenlight could have submitted months earlier while it was still in development, and been gathering votes in the meantime, they'd be idiots not to take that opportunity.
Gorlom[Swe] Feb 9, 2013 @ 5:38pm 
Originally posted by jorg11:

Every month there are about 10 games greenlit (I think there was 11 once), thats what I mean by slots. We've never seen significantly more than that. That is a quite small number, thats why i feel these places shouldn't be taken up by games that could easily be greenlit in 2014 and lose nothing because of it, because they won't even be released till then.
Just because you think you see a correlation doesn't mean there is one =) You do not know what motivated Valve to greenlight that number of games. It might be as you assume and it might not.
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Date Posted: Feb 9, 2013 @ 3:23am
Posts: 9