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Cameron25 Jan 5, 2013 @ 4:41pm
Careers In Gaming with Developers?
I have been looking into a career in the gaming industry for quite a while now, and I have wanted to take the step into entering the view of some small developers. After surfing through Greenlight, I realized that there are a lot more gaming companies then just EA or Activision that can really produce games worth the money and play time. I want to know if there are any developers put there that will work with anyone under 18. I have looked and looked but I haven’t found one that will look at me for my creativity instead of my age. Any help would be appreciated.
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tenderface Jan 5, 2013 @ 5:15pm 
There are many jobs in the game industry (e.g. programmers, environment artists, character artists, prop artists, level designers, game designers, musicians, audio engineers, etc). Which one do you want?

If the job you want is actually building things (e.g. some kind of environment artist or level designer) then start building some small projects. Go get familiar over at polycount.com and soak up all the knowledge that is available.
(6OH3) grntstateofmind Jan 5, 2013 @ 5:56pm 
cameron, if you want to start in that field you'll have to start at the bottom and work your way up given your age. keep an eye out for video game testing jobs with smaller companies. however most of them require you to work at their location.
(6OH3) grntstateofmind Jan 5, 2013 @ 5:58pm 
you can also look into classes online for video game design, full sail university is an excellent school but expensive. devry and academy of arts are less expensive
Cameron25 Jan 5, 2013 @ 6:48pm 
Wow thats a lot of information. Thank you guys!
(6OH3) grntstateofmind Jan 5, 2013 @ 7:27pm 
also forgot to mention that steam has a free download gamemaker studio to get you started. comes with tutorials on coding and such.
Cameron25 Jan 5, 2013 @ 7:39pm 
I didnt know that. Well thats exactly what I've been looking for! Thanks
C0untzer0 Jan 5, 2013 @ 11:49pm 
Youtube is also loaded with further tutorial videos, and of course, there are a number of books on Amazon dealing with how to get started. Most importantly, be patient, you won't be hired overnight.
Cameron25 Jan 6, 2013 @ 11:42am 
Thanks. Ill have to go look into those books
AusSkiller Jan 7, 2013 @ 3:13am 
I hate to be a downer but just to make sure you know what you are getting into you should keep in mind that in general developing games is done for the love of it, it does not pay well for the skill set you need to have, and expect to have some pretty crazy work hours at times (look up "crunch time"), also it's rare to actually have much (if any) creative input early on in your career other than what is required within the confines of your current task. But if you can put up with all that then it really is a great industry with lots of great people to work with and I personally have found it to be very rewarding too :).

The advice the others have given is very good, you should also check out http://www.gamedev.net/ it's a great resource for learning most aspects of game development. Also the best way to get a job in the industry is to show that you can do it, so you should build up a portfolio of work that shows what you can do, program some games/programs to demonstrate what you know if you intend to be a programmer or make some high quality low poly models with textures and animations if you intend to be an artist.

Personally I'd recommend avoiding becoming a tester and focusing on learning you area of development instead unless you really need a job, being a tester is almost certainly the worst area of games development, it's highly repetitive and boring, doesn't pay well, and you can be quite unappreciated (your work as a tester is to tell developers that they've made mistakes and to question their work, and some people may resent you for that). But it will get you some good contacts and it might be quite helpful if the companies in your area are already fully staffed in the area you want to get into as often they will look internally for new staff before posting publicly about a job opening.
Last edited by AusSkiller; Jan 7, 2013 @ 3:15am
Kristoffer Jan 7, 2013 @ 4:58pm 
Get an education first and then start looking. The only kind of job you could get now would be a game tester and such, and there's no reason why you can't do that while getting a proper education.
wilco64256 Jan 7, 2013 @ 5:24pm 
Codecademy.com is also a very useful site if you're good at picking things up on your own.
Cameron25 Jan 7, 2013 @ 8:15pm 
Originally posted by AusSkiller:
I hate to be a downer but just to make sure you know what you are getting into you should keep in mind that in general developing games is done for the love of it, it does not pay well for the skill set you need to have, and expect to have some pretty crazy work hours at times (look up "crunch time"), also it's rare to actually have much (if any) creative input early on in your career other than what is required within the confines of your current task. But if you can put up with all that then it really is a great industry with lots of great people to work with and I personally have found it to be very rewarding too :).

The advice the others have given is very good, you should also check out http://www.gamedev.net/ it's a great resource for learning most aspects of game development. Also the best way to get a job in the industry is to show that you can do it, so you should build up a portfolio of work that shows what you can do, program some games/programs to demonstrate what you know if you intend to be a programmer or make some high quality low poly models with textures and animations if you intend to be an artist.

Personally I'd recommend avoiding becoming a tester and focusing on learning you area of development instead unless you really need a job, being a tester is almost certainly the worst area of games development, it's highly repetitive and boring, doesn't pay well, and you can be quite unappreciated (your work as a tester is to tell developers that they've made mistakes and to question their work, and some people may resent you for that). But it will get you some good contacts and it might be quite helpful if the companies in your area are already fully staffed in the area you want to get into as often they will look internally for new staff before posting publicly about a job opening.

I figured this but at least I will be doing something that I truly love and I can learn while doing it. I feel like there are a lot more oppurtunities out there for me in the gaming industry then anywhere else. Thank you for the help and I will definetly look into companies in my area.
tenderface Jan 7, 2013 @ 10:15pm 
You do not need a college degree if you want to be in the game industry. The only time you will ever need a degree is if you want to work overseas.
Elizerection Jan 7, 2013 @ 10:19pm 
Originally posted by intox. Disney:
You do not need a college degree if you want to be in the game industry. The only time you will ever need a degree is if you want to work overseas.

Actually you need a college degree to get just about any job and the people who end up in game development without a college or university degree are usually outliers.
stephon A.K.A ZBRUSH warrior Jan 7, 2013 @ 10:44pm 
good luck man on persuing your dreams to bad I dont have any resources to help
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Date Posted: Jan 5, 2013 @ 4:41pm
Posts: 78