Steam Greenlight

Help pick new games for Steam

Browse through the entries here and rate up the games you want to see made available via Steam

Submit your product
Puss in Army Boots Dec 22, 2013 @ 6:03pm
Due dates for Early Access games
One of the main issues with Greenlight and Early Access games is, as an investor, we are not promised a date of completion or a regular update as to the progress of games. My main concern is that we are putting our money into indi developers and they can walk away with it, no questions asked. Correct me if I am wrong, of course.

Don't get me wrong, I find these programs extremely important to the industry. Is there a way to impliment an estimated time of completion for games in these programs? Providing a deadline is a good way to motivate someone to complete a project. Or, impliment a weekly update on progress (progress reports) for games who are Greenlight or Early Access.

Just some thoughts. I understand that schedules change and issues come up. Would be great if delays would be noted as well.
Showing 1-12 of 12 comments
< >
Gorlom[Swe] Dec 22, 2013 @ 6:58pm 
I think I kind of object to the word "investor". Doesn't that imply a share of the profits? What is wrong with customer?

Deadlines will be nearly impossible to add as there will allways be deleys, and considering Valves own attitude to deadlines and release dates it would be very hypocritical of them to force it upon others.
I would suggest thuroughly investigating a game before voting yes or buying Early Access to it.

I assume that if the dev walks off with your money you as a customer can petition Valve/Steam for a refund.
Skoardy Dec 22, 2013 @ 8:11pm 
Generally, the creation and sale of one game isn't enough to live the rest of your life from the profits. As a result, walking away isn't really much of an option if you want to continue creating games without harming your reputation. People have long memories and tend to avoid those who try to take advantage of them.

If an ETA is important to you, you could always try asking the developers in question. If the reply doesn't meet your standards or the dev doesn't feel they can nail a speculative date down, feel free to not purchase the game until it's finished.
nyhu KQLY Dec 22, 2013 @ 8:27pm 
lol.. i guess Gorlom is right
Puss in Army Boots Dec 26, 2013 @ 12:32pm 
Take a look at the Starbound model. They are granted early access status by Valve/Steam to sell the unfinished game in order to raise funds to keep development alive. In turn, Chucklefish is communicating with their investors (Because that is what they are) future plans, updates, and really engaging their investors through shows, and other media events. This is important for maintaining investor confidence. In doing so, I am more likely to invest in their future endeavours.

Investment does not grant me access to their profits but allows me some return at a future date, in this case, a finished game.
A Gelatinous Cube-Z- Dec 26, 2013 @ 2:20pm 
Originally posted by Puss in Army Boots:
Investment does not grant me access to their profits but allows me some return at a future date, in this case, a finished game.
That means you made a purchase and not an investment.
Gorlom[Swe] Dec 26, 2013 @ 8:05pm 
Originally posted by Puss in Army Boots:
Investment does not grant me access to their profits but allows me some return at a future date, in this case, a finished game.
Does this mean I invest in Granny Smith when I go buy apples?
Or Kellogs/Nestle/whatever when I buy cereal?

I would call what you describe a preorder, not an investment.

Apart from the puzzeling use of the word investor I totally agree with you that Early Access game devs benefit from communicating with their community and that they should do it as much as possible. But that is really up to each dev as it will be near impossible to enforce.
Last edited by Gorlom[Swe]; Dec 26, 2013 @ 8:09pm
Skoardy Dec 26, 2013 @ 8:09pm 
Not sure why you're pushing this terminology, OP. Either way doesn't entitle you to anything you're not already receiving.
Puss in Army Boots Jan 5, 2014 @ 4:09pm 
If I pay the farmer to produce a bushel of granny smith apples it is considered and investment with future gains.

If I pay a farmer for an already produced bushel of apples then I have made a purchase.
Skoardy Jan 5, 2014 @ 4:22pm 
Call yourself an investor. Make yourself a little badge to go with it. Still hasn't changed anything.
Gorlom[Swe] Jan 5, 2014 @ 4:43pm 
Originally posted by Puss in Army Boots:
If I pay the farmer to produce a bushel of granny smith apples it is considered and investment with future gains.

If I pay a farmer for an already produced bushel of apples then I have made a purchase.
If you pay a farmer to produce a bushel of apples that are given/delivered to you at a later date is that still not a purchuse? If you pay him to produce a bushel of apples that he then goes on to sell and shares with you part of the profit then that is imo an investment.
A Gelatinous Cube-Z- Jan 5, 2014 @ 5:58pm 
Originally posted by Puss in Army Boots:
If I pay the farmer to produce a bushel of granny smith apples it is considered either a preorder or paid temporary employment.
Fix'd.
Last edited by A Gelatinous Cube-Z-; Jan 5, 2014 @ 6:00pm
Sera Jan 5, 2014 @ 6:50pm 
@OP - To be an investor, you need to be affiliated with them anyhow and you need to gain a certain profit yourself by, you know, investing with anyone for anything. Early access and kickstarter games that you buy are nothing but pre-order (purchase) or rather something that you accept to PAY for in advance.

Your definition of Investment is dead wrong. Just saying...
Showing 1-12 of 12 comments
< >
Per page: 15 30 50
Date Posted: Dec 22, 2013 @ 6:03pm
Posts: 12