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roboman101 Dec 14, 2013 @ 5:55pm
"Trials of Insanity" need suggestions
I look forward into making a game titled "Trials of Insanity" it takes place in the future in a time where a solution ment to cure disabilities, lead to everybody turning against each other due to their lack of sanity from said solution, some don't even know what goes on anymore, even animals are effected, some behave like otehr animals, some are mutated, and for others the prey became the preditor. it has a first person perspective where you use weapons and items to assist you and use other people's 'point of view' to help with finding the said weapons and traveling the land in one piece.

what i need is suggestions, what would like to see in Trials of Insanity? what will make you and others want to play it? please let me know so i can soon begin to make this game.
Last edited by roboman101; Dec 15, 2013 @ 4:02pm
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Gorlom[Swe] Dec 14, 2013 @ 6:34pm 
Greenlight is not the best place for these kind of questions tbh. the forum isn't frequented enough to get proper feedback imo.

Also you are failing to provide a lot of relevant/neccessary information. What type of game is it for instance? shooter, RPG, platformer, point and click adventure? What camera angle? First person, Third person, topdown, isometric, standard pointandclick camera angles?

AusSkiller Dec 15, 2013 @ 1:39am 
Make sure you add quite a plenty of friendly insane people to contrast the insane enemies you could also have a few of the friendly people become hostile for some insane reason just to keep the player on their toes. You should also have a lot of variety in their insanity that affects gameplay, for instance some enemies could be afraid of your face so when you are looking at them they run and hide, but they'll charge in and brutally beat you when you when your back is turned. There's a lot you could do with the AI in such a game and I suggest playing with it a lot to find out some fun and interesting behaviors for the people in the game.
roboman101 Dec 15, 2013 @ 3:58pm 
Originally posted by GorlomSwe:
Greenlight is not the best place for these kind of questions tbh. the forum isn't frequented enough to get proper feedback imo.

Also you are failing to provide a lot of relevant/neccessary information. What type of game is it for instance? shooter, RPG, platformer, point and click adventure? What camera angle? First person, Third person, topdown, isometric, standard pointandclick camera angles?

that may be true but where can i find suggestions? and its a first person perspective where you use weapons and other character's perspective to your advantage

Originally posted by AusSkiller:
Make sure you add quite a plenty of friendly insane people to contrast the insane enemies you could also have a few of the friendly people become hostile for some insane reason just to keep the player on their toes. You should also have a lot of variety in their insanity that affects gameplay, for instance some enemies could be afraid of your face so when you are looking at them they run and hide, but they'll charge in and brutally beat you when you when your back is turned. There's a lot you could do with the AI in such a game and I suggest playing with it a lot to find out some fun and interesting behaviors for the people in the game.

i have thought about some things like that, such as enemies that try to set you on fire, or enemies that attack if you get too close or make too much noise, but i never thought of characters that turn hostile, i have put WAY too much thought into the story line
Gorlom[Swe] Dec 15, 2013 @ 4:53pm 
Originally posted by kampy_ON_FIRE2358:
Originally posted by GorlomSwe:
Greenlight is not the best place for these kind of questions tbh. the forum isn't frequented enough to get proper feedback imo.

Also you are failing to provide a lot of relevant/neccessary information. What type of game is it for instance? shooter, RPG, platformer, point and click adventure? What camera angle? First person, Third person, topdown, isometric, standard pointandclick camera angles?
Congratulations on using my post to get a pillar of the community badge.. :S
AusSkiller Dec 15, 2013 @ 4:56pm 
Originally posted by roboman101:
i have put WAY too much thought into the story line
Be careful about doing that, you usually want to only have a fairly rough story at the start of development because you will often need to change the story a LOT during development to ensure it supports the gameplay. If it's too detailed then all the time you spent writing that detail can be wasted when you realize you need to scrap or significantly change a portion of it because it doesn't fit with the gameplay or is outside the scope of the game, and any cutting or changing of such work can really be a painful experience, especially if you poured your heart into it. Because of that if you have more than just a guide for the story then you can feel pressured to alter the gameplay (often to it's detriment) or leave in some immersion killing plot holes in order to have the story play out the way you wrote it, and that is usually a worse outcome than when you fill in the details of the story to fit around the rest of the game later in development once you know which parts of your game work well and which should be dropped.

Don't get me wrong though, it depends a lot on the game you are making and sometimes it can work quite well having a nice detailed story to draw from when looking for inspiration to improve the gameplay and other aspects of a game, but more often the case is that you are left with either mediocre gameplay that feels more like a chore you need to do to hear the story or a game where the gameplay doesn't fit with the story and opens up some rather obvious and immersion killing plot holes or inconsistencies that can really hurt the story.
roboman101 Dec 15, 2013 @ 7:01pm 
Originally posted by AusSkiller:
Originally posted by roboman101:
i have put WAY too much thought into the story line
Be careful about doing that, you usually want to only have a fairly rough story at the start of development because you will often need to change the story a LOT during development to ensure it supports the gameplay. If it's too detailed then all the time you spent writing that detail can be wasted when you realize you need to scrap or significantly change a portion of it because it doesn't fit with the gameplay or is outside the scope of the game, and any cutting or changing of such work can really be a painful experience, especially if you poured your heart into it. Because of that if you have more than just a guide for the story then you can feel pressured to alter the gameplay (often to it's detriment) or leave in some immersion killing plot holes in order to have the story play out the way you wrote it, and that is usually a worse outcome than when you fill in the details of the story to fit around the rest of the game later in development once you know which parts of your game work well and which should be dropped.

Don't get me wrong though, it depends a lot on the game you are making and sometimes it can work quite well having a nice detailed story to draw from when looking for inspiration to improve the gameplay and other aspects of a game, but more often the case is that you are left with either mediocre gameplay that feels more like a chore you need to do to hear the story or a game where the gameplay doesn't fit with the story and opens up some rather obvious and immersion killing plot holes or inconsistencies that can really hurt the story.

so in other words, start with the main idea of the game, make the gameplay mechanics and other gameplay details, then based on those details, build up the story to fit with the gameplay
[RaG] Jimmy Dec 15, 2013 @ 7:18pm 
Thats ok :D
AusSkiller Dec 16, 2013 @ 7:53am 
Originally posted by roboman101:
so in other words, start with the main idea of the game, make the gameplay mechanics and other gameplay details, then based on those details, build up the story to fit with the gameplay
Sort of, you can still start with the story, you can even flesh out some of the major characters a bit and generalize some pivotal plot points, the key thing is not to get to far into the dialog, events or how challenges in the story are overcome yet. You just need the broad strokes that give the game context and meaning, then you can build your gameplay to play out that story. You'll often find that while making the gameplay certain things you think will be fun just aren't and discover new things you hadn't thought of that are fun, not having a detailed story allows you to use the fun gameplay to play out your story instead of what you originally envisaged. And once you have the gameplay mostly sorted out you can then add in the details to the story in a way that allows you to capitalize on the best aspects of the gameplay such as having a playable fight scene where you might have envisaged a very specific fight scene that would need to be scripted instead.

Of course this is just my opinion based on what I've seen happen in the past and have read/seen in developer articles/videos, I have not actually written for a released game myself so I'm not an expert, and as I've said it's not always a problem starting with a detailed story, it's just something to keep in mind. If you already have a detailed story you can also often avoid most of the problems by simply re-examining the all the major events and dialog of the story after developing the gameplay and asking yourself if there's some way to change the story for that event so that the gameplay around it would be better, and is everything in the story/dialog consistent with how the game plays. For a good example of where the latter has failed look to Final Fantasy 7, a major character dies permanently in a story event but all throughout the game you could use a certain item to revive a dead character so having them die permanently breaks the immersion and doesn't feel the way it should have, that's the sort of thing you should be looking out for, and that sort of thing can be easily overlooked by having the story written in detail before the mechanics and gameplay are fleshed out.



Edit:
I've been going through the Extra Credits videos again (there's a lot of great info on games and game design in them) and just saw the following one which you might find interesting as it explains some problems with starting with a story:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=22HoViH4vOU&list=PLhyKYa0YJ_5DlX-j-KnPUbAA29X85fElx
Last edited by AusSkiller; Dec 16, 2013 @ 1:24pm
roboman101 Dec 17, 2013 @ 2:10pm 
Originally posted by AusSkiller:
Sort of, you can still start with the story, you can even flesh out some of the major characters a bit and generalize some pivotal plot points, the key thing is not to get to far into the dialog, events or how challenges in the story are overcome yet. You just need the broad strokes that give the game context and meaning, then you can build your gameplay to play out that story. You'll often find that while making the gameplay certain things you think will be fun just aren't and discover new things you hadn't thought of that are fun, not having a detailed story allows you to use the fun gameplay to play out your story instead of what you originally envisaged. And once you have the gameplay mostly sorted out you can then add in the details to the story in a way that allows you to capitalize on the best aspects of the gameplay such as having a playable fight scene where you might have envisaged a very specific fight scene that would need to be scripted instead.

Of course this is just my opinion based on what I've seen happen in the past and have read/seen in developer articles/videos, I have not actually written for a released game myself so I'm not an expert, and as I've said it's not always a problem starting with a detailed story, it's just something to keep in mind. If you already have a detailed story you can also often avoid most of the problems by simply re-examining the all the major events and dialog of the story after developing the gameplay and asking yourself if there's some way to change the story for that event so that the gameplay around it would be better, and is everything in the story/dialog consistent with how the game plays. For a good example of where the latter has failed look to Final Fantasy 7, a major character dies permanently in a story event but all throughout the game you could use a certain item to revive a dead character so having them die permanently breaks the immersion and doesn't feel the way it should have, that's the sort of thing you should be looking out for, and that sort of thing can be easily overlooked by having the story written in detail before the mechanics and gameplay are fleshed out.



Edit:
I've been going through the Extra Credits videos again (there's a lot of great info on games and game design in them) and just saw the following one which you might find interesting as it explains some problems with starting with a story:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=22HoViH4vOU&list=PLhyKYa0YJ_5DlX-j-KnPUbAA29X85fElx
thanks!
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Date Posted: Dec 14, 2013 @ 5:55pm
Posts: 9