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JZ_Rainbow_Flarez Mar 18 @ 2:47am
how should i start?
what are good ways to start making games and programs to help?
plz help i want to start badly
i have some idars to witch help inspier me
sos for my bad spelling
Last edited by JZ_Rainbow_Flarez; Mar 18 @ 2:51am
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Sir Strygwyr of Cykaland Mar 18 @ 2:49am 
Start with an engine. Play around in it. Know what you can do and cannot do. Make a judgement on how the game should go due to the limitations. Build basic mechanics. Build plot. Build environments. Send off to greenlight when tested properly.
Last edited by Sir Strygwyr of Cykaland; Mar 18 @ 2:49am
JZ_Rainbow_Flarez Mar 18 @ 2:51am 
Originally posted by Bloodseeker Edge -----(I====>:
Start with an engine. Play around in it. Know what you can do and cannot do. Make a judgement on how the game should go due to the limitations. Build basic mechanics. Build plot. Build environments. Send off to greenlight when tested properly.
thanks a lot
C0untzer0 Mar 18 @ 3:40am 
Make a thing
Make a thing move
Make Pong
Make Arkanoid
Make a simple game with what you've learnt.
Sir Strygwyr of Cykaland Mar 18 @ 3:41am 
Originally posted by C0untzer0:
Make a thing
Make a thing move
Make Pong
Make Arkanoid
Make a simple game with what you've learnt.
If you are REALLY starting out...^This.
Last edited by Sir Strygwyr of Cykaland; Mar 18 @ 3:41am
AusSkiller Mar 18 @ 4:22am 
As far as tools go the common industry standard ones are as follows:

Programming: Visual Studio
2D Art: Photoshop
3D Art: It can vary a lot but it usually involves at least one of either Mudbox, 3D Studio Max or Maya.

If you can't afford the rather high price tags of them (most are over $1000 for a commercial license) then these are the commonly used free alternatives that are nearly as good:

Programming: Visual Studio Express Edition
2D Art: GIMP
3D Art: Blender


Be warned though, you will probably need to drastically cut back your expectations for the kind of game you will be able to make, even simple indie games can require over a year to develop with an experienced team, a single inexperienced developer is going to really struggle to develop a game that can compete in the market today, especially if you want to be able to complete it within the next 5 years.
zeropoint101 Mar 27 @ 2:53am 
To throw in a suggestion here, if you're a total beginner, I suggest trying to make a mod or two for a game you already know and love. Or buy a game that is known to have good modding tools if you don't own one already. Making a mod is, depending on the mod, going to a be a much smaller project than making a full game, you usually already have a modding community to help you out, tools pre-built for you but still require some learning that you can use later on. Don't Starve is a relatively easy game to do a bit of modding, it has some great mod tools, and a good community. Half Life 2 is another good one to learn about designing maps and various other things you'll need to understand later. I'm sure there are many others you can get suggestions for if you go this route.

HELL WARRIOR Mar 29 @ 2:26am 
I know a lot of people dog the Unity engine but I highly recommend it. You can download a free version of it. You wouldn't know it from most Unity games you see on Greenlight but Unity is capable of making some amazing games.
Gorlom[Swe] Mar 29 @ 3:17am 
Originally posted by HELL WARRIOR:
I know a lot of people dog the Unity engine but I highly recommend it. You can download a free version of it. You wouldn't know it from most Unity games you see on Greenlight but Unity is capable of making some amazing games.
Just make sure you understand the licensing agreements of free products. Some will start demanding money if you sell over X dollars. (not sure that will ever be an issue just thought I'd mention it though)
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Date Posted: Mar 18 @ 2:47am
Posts: 8