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Nebula Jul 31 @ 5:01pm
Remove and re-submit or update
I submitted a game to greenlight about a week ago and it hasn't done so well with 75% no votes. I've now done a graphics overhaul and made some other changes based on the feedback I was given, but it is now past the point where it gets a lot of views due to being on the most recent page and in people's voting queue's.

Should I:

A) Remove and re-submit my game a second time so that it re-appears on the most recent page and in people's voting queue's, but lose the 800+ yes votes I already have (if this is against the rules please notify me).

B) Edit/Update the game with the changes, keeping the yes votes I already have but not get as many views of the updated version from this point on.

Thanks.
Showing 1-15 of 51 comments
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Gorlom[Swe] Jul 31 @ 5:23pm 
Depends on how big the change is imo.

If you feel that it is significant then you could probably repost. BUT! If you do repost I would suggest that you include a comment about why you are doing so ("complete overhaul", "different game than described in the previous greenlight page", "the old page no longer represented my game" are all words/phrases I would suggest you use.. assuming they are true.)
Skoardy Jul 31 @ 5:29pm 
Personally, it sounds like you've got a valid reason to re-submit (if this overhaul really is a substantial change). I doubt you'll get any of those lost votes back simply from changing your page and posting an announcement on it.
Nebula Jul 31 @ 5:38pm 
Thanks guys, very helpful.

It definitely is a large, significant change in my opinion and including an explanation of why I am re-submitting is most certainly a good idea.

Any other input would be much appreciated!
Gorlom[Swe] Jul 31 @ 5:42pm 
Don't post the explanation for the resubmission at the top as that might turn away people that didn't see the old page. :p

include gameplay vids and screenshots that really shows off your game. (I'm starting to get tired of screenshots in FPS games showcaseing the sky and some foliage).
also perhaps include a vid with a voiceover where you explain certain things if they are difficult to grasp just by looking.
Last edited by Gorlom[Swe]; Jul 31 @ 5:44pm
mazman Jul 31 @ 6:11pm 
Classy post, you didn't even mention the name of your game.

I find the idea of resubmitting great, because like in your case, the game gets a nice overhaul. Also, once a game gets on about page 6, it's probably entering the dead zone. So a resubmit could be it's only chance. I would rather have developers reposting better versions of their games instead of an influx of new crappy games.

So go right ahead.

Only repost if you really feel you overhauled the game, and only do it a couple times.

Otherwise, you will get those same no votes, flags from people who think your spamming, and tons of angry comments.

-----------------------------------------------

I only hope that this practice won't become widespread and abused but Greenlighters will catch on very quickly and then crappy developers will have to deal with a mob of people flagging the game.
Gorlom[Swe] Jul 31 @ 6:16pm 
Originally posted by mazman:
I only hope that this practice won't become widespread and abused but Greenlighters will catch on very quickly and then crappy developers will have to deal with a mob of people flagging the game.
There was this one dev that had a sad kind of platformer (that looked cobbled together in a few hours) that he keept resubmitting. I think he resubmitted it 3-4 times in one day towards the end. For the final version he changed the 2.5D sideview into an over the shoulder third person view. Still didn't go all to well for him as everyone recognized his game and the frequent resubmissions just looked bad.
Last edited by Gorlom[Swe]; Jul 31 @ 6:17pm
Nebula Jul 31 @ 6:19pm 
Alright, fantastic, I'll go ahead and do that then! Thanks a bunch for the input guys, very much appreciated.
Skoardy Jul 31 @ 6:20pm 
There are already some devs who resubmit with zero changes simply for another roll of the dice, I guess, and that is a terrible practice, IMO. I recall one shameless dev who even had four or five versions of the same page up at the same time.

Edit: Worryingly, not the same dev Gorlom is talking about either.
Last edited by Skoardy; Jul 31 @ 6:21pm
mazman Jul 31 @ 6:27pm 
Okay, what's the name of the game. Come on, it's not spam if I'm asing.
Sera Jul 31 @ 6:31pm 
Originally posted by mazman:
Okay, what's the name of the game. Come on, it's not spam if I'm asing.
You don't need to know it... The name of the game is not even what the thread is about.
Nebula Jul 31 @ 6:32pm 
Originally posted by mazman:
Okay, what's the name of the game. Come on, it's not spam if I'm asking.
Haha, "Chiptune Champion" :)
Last edited by Nebula; Jul 31 @ 6:32pm
Gorlom[Swe] Aug 1 @ 2:27am 
Originally posted by mazman:
Okay, what's the name of the game. Come on, it's not spam if I'm asing.
You know that if you are really that interested you could just click his name, go to his profile and look under "greenlight items" to find it.
Cleril Aug 1 @ 3:30am 
My two cents as a developer: It shouldn't be worth it.

Every single game starts off with a large proportion of "No" votes unless you're something with a huge fanbase from the start like Project Zomboid.

And "No" votes do not count anyway. With my title, I doubt any changes I make would convince users otherwise because of the subject matter. Most negative feedback from my game is "This dun belong on muh Steam" because apparently Steam has it's own form of SJW.

Fact is that Greenlight doesn't have a filter for nonconstructive users but it tries to filter out indies with the 100 dollar fee. And democracy is a terrible form of anything.

Most titles seem to slowly climb up and they suddenly explode. I imagine the explosion is once gaming media writes about your game.

Basically the viewers you get from Steam are most likely going to say no, that's just the way this works.

If you want enough yes votes you get greenlight you have to bring in your own crowd.

These links should help you find your audience: http://www.pixelprospector.com/the-big-list-of-indie-game-sites/

http://youtubers.pixelprospector.com/

http://www.pixelprospector.com/the-big-list-of-video-game-sites/
Skoardy Aug 1 @ 4:26am 
Originally posted by Cleril:
With my title, I doubt any changes I make would convince users otherwise because of the subject matter. Most negative feedback from my game is "This dun belong on muh Steam" because apparently Steam has it's own form of SJW.
But if the issues/complaints about a game are about the presentation rather than the game's fundamental nature, and the presentation is improved, then surely that's a completely different situation and 'worth it'?
Cleril Aug 1 @ 7:04am 
Originally posted by Skoardy:
Originally posted by Cleril:
With my title, I doubt any changes I make would convince users otherwise because of the subject matter. Most negative feedback from my game is "This dun belong on muh Steam" because apparently Steam has it's own form of SJW.
But if the issues/complaints about a game are about the presentation rather than the game's fundamental nature, and the presentation is improved, then surely that's a completely different situation and 'worth it'?

Depends on what the complaints are and that itself is really impossible to judge since most voters do not comment at all good or bad.

I could potentially get more yes votes if I re-submit, sure.

However, from what I see of the graphs overall most gets are below 1000 yes votes until day 15+.

Most games then literally turn into a skyscraper on the graph reaching 5000+ votes within the next day or two.

Which the only explanation I have for that is the gaming media covered it. At least, one of the more popular media outlets did.

Steam itself will only net you 6,000ish views. And most users on Steam will vote "No." Even popular projects we know now did have a high No:Yes ratio when they started.

Gamers are very weird.

"We want new kinds of games!"

"OMG teh porn addiction you blithering idiot visual novels don't belong on teh Steams!!111!"

In my situation I'd just stick with what I got. Considering my title is rather extremely niche I'd say I'm doing exceeding well since I'm above the track record for the games in the top 100. That is, compared to the top 20 item I'm on the same track path as it was.

My advice to the OP is to have patience and email every single person you can from the sites I listed.

I've had 3 articles done so far with 1-2 more on the way. The one coming up is going to get me at least 1K worth of new visitors.

If what occurs is what seems to occur with all titles on Greenlight then that 1K visits will likely give me at least 750 "yes" votes which would probably put me over 30% to the top 100 games.

And then because the site covered it now other sites want to cover it.

You want to try to create a snowball effect as that is what the graphs show.

I just truly hope whatever Valve is doing with Greenlight actually turns it into something half-decent.

It works as is, don't get me wrong.

But I'd argue there needs to be some type of filter for who can vote if you're going to filter who can submit.

I don't think users should be able to make baseless accusations against a developer saying that they didn't do the art or music.

I didn't pay 100 dollars (charity or not) to get slander. I know it's the internet but if I'm paying 100 dollars I think Valve can prevent users from causing potential chaos and harming my reputation.
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