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Vive Developer Editions are Shipping

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39 Comments
davecaptinz Aug 23, 2015 @ 6:25am 
has eny one got one for sale???????????????????
Burnie "Molotov" Sanders Jul 5, 2015 @ 9:20am 
Guys, wouldn't it be AWSOME if TES5:S would be in VR? Or Dead Space in VR? That athmosphere! Bethesta needs a kit ofc.
mewle Jun 29, 2015 @ 1:58pm 
I'm not a developer but i'll swap my kids for a kit! :)
chiliwili69 Jun 26, 2015 @ 2:26am 
Hi, I have a question regarding this news.
Is the 777/1C Game Studios in the shipping list? or have they been qualified?

They are the creator of the 2 top combat flight simulators:
- Rise of Flight (ROF)
- IL2- Battle of Stalingrad (BOS)

They were working of the previous Oculus DK1/DK2 but they struggled when Oculus abandoned DX9 support.

I believe they have applied for the development edition and they are interested in support VR in their games. According to the BOS poll, about 60% of the existing flying community want to go to VR, therefore it means thousands of people buying the HTC Vive just because it support BOS/ROF games.

From my humble individuality, please make all the efforts to support the 777/1C Game Studios
Thanks
Black Lodge Games, LLC Jun 11, 2015 @ 3:43pm 
Awesome news! Hope I qualify and keep up the hard work!
dxmachina Jun 11, 2015 @ 1:27pm 
I wish there was a little more transparency in who gets kits and when. I didn't even get an email confirmation after my initial request.

For those of us that are excited to target Vive and Lighthouse control specifically it's really hard to piece together anything even close for dev/testing. I'm sure I'm not the only one who would gladly pay for a dev kit if it meant earlier access.

Anyway, not meaning to rant... just anxious to test my project with working controllers.
narayana games Jun 9, 2015 @ 11:39am 
So I don't think anyone really needs native Mac / Linux support of the built games much earlier than 4-8 weeks before the release of the consumer versions of the hardware.

And then there's this other issue. Look here: http://stats.unity3d.com/pc/os.html - 97% Windows Player, 2.9% OS X Player. 0.1% Linux Player. So the testing, fixing minor issues and performance optimization will be for only 3% more potential players. For Steam users, it's 4%, so that's almost the same.
narayana games Jun 9, 2015 @ 11:39am 
The point of my original reply to you, @chrix, was that right now, there's no consumer product - and for development, people that are serious about developing will pick whichever OS / software works. Have a look at http://stats.unity3d.com/editor/os.html - right now, 89.7% of the people using Unity use the editor on Windows. 10.3% on the Mac ... so in the case of Unity, only about 10% of the developers even have to make a choice here. The other 90% already made that choice.

When using a tool like Unity (and most likely it's not much different with UE4), when my game works well on Windows, it will be enough to do thorough testing and fix minor issues (and potentially apply a *lot* of performance optimization) on Mac/Linux in the last stages of development. It's not like multiplatform support is something I need to worry much about in the initial stages (when the target "platform" is VR / desktops ... and not mobile or consoles, which needs to be taken care of much earlier).
chrix Jun 8, 2015 @ 7:25am 
Thy unity 5.0 editor works okay in wine on linux. Not great, but usable. But the developed software should really run natively, because at least with the oculus plugin it runs a little bit laggy in wine.

The unreal editor support is officially "finished" in 4.8, but is only availabe as source for now: https://trello.com/c/vjPubFHt/111-linux-native-editor-done-4-8
jashan Jun 8, 2015 @ 7:11am 
In the end, what matters right now is having development set up as smoothly as possible. If it was easiest on Linux, I'd get a native Linux machine; if it was easiest on the Mac, I'd keep my current setup ... but right now it's easier to move a lot of my stuff over to Windows than trying to make it work on the Mac, so that's what I'm using for development (and the framerate stability concerns do play a role in that equation as well - so I'll use what I have for testing whenever it at least runs in principle which is most likely before customer release ;-) ).

Of course, switching the engine would also be an option - but overall I'm very happy with Unity and switching OS is much easier for me than switching engine (this, of course, also has to do with being familiar enough with Windows ;-) ).