Persson- Apr 30 @ 4:07pm
How can we get rid of hackers, They are unlimited? CSGO
get rid of cheaters once and for all
So, we all have experienced the hackers right? And it gets pretty annoying..
They get banned, maybe... Let's say.. 1 hour after a game. Well that means they have ruined 1-3 games and even if they get banned they would buy a new account and continue.

So, I have come up with something really awesome in my opinion. I am begging you to give this a try. "IF" you get alot of reports AND you get banned for cheats your history games should all be reseted and all those 10 players in those games will get their gaming XP/rank they lost during those games back to normal as if they game never happent. Which means no1 will ever buy boost again because it's going to be a rollback. ( get rid of boosting/hackers )

tip 2: Hardware ip ban. Wich means you are banning the hackers hardware, so that he cannot buy another account and cheat. Changing ip wont matter.
I have just played 16 matche now and I have faced aimbotters in every single one of them.. 16 games, if not more.

I am tired, many people are. Want people to stay? Make a change.
Get this to work, and it will be awesome.
Last edited by Persson-; May 2 @ 12:23pm
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Black Blade Apr 30 @ 4:15pm 
IP hardware ban is not easy to do.. and has many chances to be cheated...

And think that each time the "hacker" dose that they need to pay 15$ for a new game

and they lose all there old stats. so i do not see much the point with the resetting the score
aiusepsi Apr 30 @ 4:16pm 
1. People cheat in games where there aren't persistent ranks. Undoing the change to ranks won't do a thing.

2. Hardware bans sound attractive, but it would not surprise me at all if cheat software could spoof the IDs, which makes them worthless.
Spawn of Totoro Apr 30 @ 9:06pm 
Unfortunately there is never an end to "hackers", even on consoles. There will always be those who find a way to "hack" a game on any platform and ruin other people's experience.

The only method I can think of (and still isn't fool proof) is cloud computing, where everything is processed on a server. Even then, I'm sure someone will still find a way to "hack" the game.

Combating "hackers" is a constant, uphill battle. They are not limited to what they can/will do to "hack" a game, but those who make anti-cheat systems are limited. If an anti-cheat acted like a "hack" there would be privacy complaints, among other things.

While getting hardware serial number and such would work temporarily, they will always be able to get around it at some point. I don't think it would take much to mask those numbers and/or fake them (as has been said).
moomooaloomoo Apr 30 @ 9:41pm 
I wouldn't be surprised if the number was over half of certain servers. People cheat like crazy. In my opinion though, they're usually only cheating themselves, ruining their own gameplay experience. Generally, if they're shooting you through walls, report them + call them out on it. If they're giving you a chance to shoot them in the face though and pretending they're not hacking - take that opportunity and shoot them in the face. There's nothing more satisfying than beating someone who's using aids and STILL losing.

Seriously though I miss the days when people didn't hack and focused that programming knowledge on global modifications like grapple hooks and stuff, for everyone to use.

@Persson, maybe try Tactical Intervention? It's free to play but I bet there are less hacks there.
Tito Christmas May 1 @ 4:05am 
Gaming communities owning well managed servers with server admins that can deal with cheaters on sight has worked effectively for ages.

Sadly the industry (Centralized gaming servers) and gamers ourselves (Managing a server? 'Aint nobody got time fo' that!') have detached from that in favour of 'Press Button, Receive Match' systems, which most of the time eny the users the ability to police their own gaming experience.

A (more) 'cheater free' (a fully 'cheater free' one is a fallacy) game requires work from all parts involved. We've just grown lazy and sit on our sofa waiting for [insert ACS of your choice] 'To do their job'
Ineffable Anathema May 1 @ 7:45am 
The problem is the nature of the internet, that being a haven for anonymity and lies. It's very difficult to determine exactly who you are dealing with on the net at any given time, which is why few court cases tend to get anywhere without some method of pinning down exactly who was at the computer at a specific time. In online gaming, this is obviously nearly impossible.

Hardware bans? They can use hacks to get around them, they can use a different machine (many people have several), or a friend's computer, or an internet cafe, or simply purchase new parts (I'm not sure which parts would need to be replaced.)

IP bans? Very easy to spoof, also many people have dynamic ones to begin with, and in addition there are a great number of people who share IP's due to living in the same house or even using the same computer.

Bans by name and location? It's easy enough to lie about this on the internet, make up false ID's, and spoof your location.

Bans by payment method? They will simply switch to another method, get another credit card, a new paypal account, or whatever.

My point is, it's nearly impossible to tell who you're dealing with online, so the best method currently is still constant vigilance by server admins combined with permanent bans by account so that at least those accounts are out of the picture. I'm unsure if Valve could somehow limit the number of accounts a person or household can make each year without requiring very personal information such as an official identification card scan or some such thing, which gets into sticky privacy issues.
Last edited by Ineffable Anathema; May 1 @ 7:47am
Whippy May 1 @ 5:28pm 
Originally posted by Tito Shivan:
Gaming communities owning well managed servers with server admins that can deal with cheaters on sight has worked effectively for ages.
QFT

Cheaters can not be stopped unfortunatly. Owners/operators of privately funded servers may do as they like, but that will not stop an offensive dweeb from going to another server.

Call of Duty MW2 and onward shows us how polluted games can be without human interaction. You can see a cheater, but cannot do anything.

CS:Go matchmaking is trying to use human interaction through "overwatch" (I don't know a thing about it). They tout its merits, but as Tito pointed out people don't want to be watching matches and moderating communities. I have CS:Go...can't say I like it.

I speak from experience. I managed a fairly populated CS:S network for 6 years when CS:S was at its peak. It was a never ending headache of "Hey watch this demo" etc. It was non-stop for years. At times you find nothing wrong, and then you are blamed for not knowing what you are looking at. At times you find an obvious cheat, and someone else says the exact same thing.

When I asked for help in monitoring these things, everyone scattered. No one wants to have to do that. It cut into their "having fun time". I quit the group I created after 6 years because I wanted to play games, not monitor and babysit. Without my presence, the server deep-sixed.

So there is a strange relationship. Vac is a reactive system. It does not detect a new cheat that is unknown. Individual servers can protect themselves with educated admins. They need to believe in the system they are monitoring, and not let personal feeling affect judgements.

But you realize quickly that though you banned a few of these players from your server, they are just in another server causing someone else grief. Your job as an admin is unsung, and at times highly underappreciated. (This goes beyond just being a server admin).

Looking back I would have done it all different. I would have had NOTHING at all to do with it. Some parts were ok, but I would have prefered to play the game and not have delt with the issues. I paid to play a game, I was never paid for the headaches, and very few people really appreciate the amount of time spent sorting through server logs, watching demos and being the bad guy.
Ineffable Anathema May 4 @ 1:10pm 
Originally posted by Self-Righteous:
Originally posted by Tito Shivan:
Gaming communities owning well managed servers with server admins that can deal with cheaters on sight has worked effectively for ages.
QFT

Cheaters can not be stopped unfortunatly. Owners/operators of privately funded servers may do as they like, but that will not stop an offensive dweeb from going to another server.

Your job as an admin is unsung, and at times highly underappreciated. (This goes beyond just being a server admin).

Looking back I would have done it all different. I would have had NOTHING at all to do with it. Some parts were ok, but I would have prefered to play the game and not have delt with the issues. I paid to play a game, I was never paid for the headaches, and very few people really appreciate the amount of time spent sorting through server logs, watching demos and being the bad guy.

So much truth here. My better half spent a while being an admin in a gaming clan for an online game we both played, and it was seriously an endless tirade of "hey watch this" and "hey ban this guy" and "I didn't do anything wrong so why am I banned" and even threats against some admins/servers. It was an enormous headache to be frank, and I think he was actually relieved when the clan started to break up and he quit doing the admin thing and just went back to playing when he wanted to. It's a bit like being a paramedic or a police officer I suppose, you have off duty times, but is there really ever a point where you aren't expected to be on immediate duty merely due to the circumstances taking place around you? Not likely.
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Date Posted: Apr 30 @ 4:07pm
Posts: 8