TempoDoe Oct 2, 2013 @ 10:16pm
MAC GAMES PLZ
Why is it so hard to make games for mac's
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pablasso Oct 3, 2013 @ 12:27am 
Because economy.
Kargor Oct 3, 2013 @ 1:06am 
It's not that much harder than making games for consoles or Windows -- but it's about as expensive.

Also, something that people often fail to realize in discussions like this: it doesn't matter whether someone plays the game on Mac if it exists. What matters is whether making a Mac version of the game will attract enough NEW customers to warrant the development. A customer playing the Mac version if it exists, and playing the Windows version if it doesn't is of no concern.

Since a "mac gamer" basically doesn't exist due to lack of games (anyone who would be a "mac gamer" will be using a console or windows box to play) it's probably not all that simple to get enough new customers from making a Mac port: most of the gaming audience doesn't apply since they are already covered, and other Mac users are more likely to prefer "casual" 99 cent titles, if anything.

And that's not even taking into account that Mac ports are secondary -- they receive less attention. While this also reduces the costs (at least on paper) since less time is spent on it, it also reduces the quality of the product, which makes the Mac port less attractive. Thus, again: Windows isn't just more common, the games also work better...

Things are even worse for Linux games: Mac people are basically people who don't mind shelling out a lot of money for design gadgets or having a mostly useless computer with an illuminated Apple logo because it's considered to be a cool thing to have. Linux people, on the other hand, don't like "paying" at all... so while all of the above applies as well, plus increased development efforts (= costs) due to the fragmented platform, you will also have problems getting them to actually BUY something.
Lyniah Oct 4, 2013 @ 6:23am 
It isn't difficult as Kargor mentioned. Most Windows-only games use DirectX (which is Windows only) for 3D rendering, but they can easily enough use OpenGL (which also works on Linux). I guess the main factor, is, that most teams just don't try it, because of their long history of using DirectX (which was ahead of OpenGL many years ago).

There are of course also these horrible ports EA is doing, which is essentially an emulator for their Windows version (e.g. for The Sims 3).

In the end it is a marketing decision. I guess with the Mac becoming more popular every year, and the announcement of Steam OS (which is Linux based), more and more games on Steam will support all 3 platforms.

I personally only buy games with Mac support nowadays, since my Windows gaming machine is quite old and tends to fail often, so I want to be able to play the games on my primary computers.
Le Doge Oct 4, 2013 @ 10:50pm 
Laziness esentially. The coding is all there, it's just the elements required to run the plug-ins and such that people lack when making games.
Shufflecake Holmes Oct 5, 2013 @ 1:04am 
Originally posted by Lyniah:
It isn't difficult as Kargor mentioned. Most Windows-only games use DirectX (which is Windows only) for 3D rendering, but they can easily enough use OpenGL (which also works on Linux). I guess the main factor, is, that most teams just don't try it, because of their long history of using DirectX (which was ahead of OpenGL many years ago).

There are of course also these horrible ports EA is doing, which is essentially an emulator for their Windows version (e.g. for The Sims 3).

In the end it is a marketing decision. I guess with the Mac becoming more popular every year, and the announcement of Steam OS (which is Linux based), more and more games on Steam will support all 3 platforms.

I personally only buy games with Mac support nowadays, since my Windows gaming machine is quite old and tends to fail often, so I want to be able to play the games on my primary computers.

It's also due to Apple's approach to their OSX they did not take gaming seriously for years.

Originally posted by April:
Laziness esentially. The coding is all there, it's just the elements required to run the plug-ins and such that people lack when making games.

Also it all depends on what their Master Files are going to be built for. And the list also goes on with Shader files/languages running with certain cards, Also the fill rate for different cards comes into play, most can possess this information accurately, but not all. It creates errors and weird bugs at times especially console ports. Anyway I don't want to bore you with all the details but it is ultimately up to the Developer/Publisher.




I'M REALLY FEELING IT (Banned) Oct 5, 2013 @ 1:28am 
Originally posted by Kargor:
It's not that much harder than making games for consoles or Windows -- but it's about as expensive.

Also, something that people often fail to realize in discussions like this: it doesn't matter whether someone plays the game on Mac if it exists. What matters is whether making a Mac version of the game will attract enough NEW customers to warrant the development. A customer playing the Mac version if it exists, and playing the Windows version if it doesn't is of no concern.

Since a "mac gamer" basically doesn't exist due to lack of games (anyone who would be a "mac gamer" will be using a console or windows box to play) it's probably not all that simple to get enough new customers from making a Mac port: most of the gaming audience doesn't apply since they are already covered, and other Mac users are more likely to prefer "casual" 99 cent titles, if anything.

And that's not even taking into account that Mac ports are secondary -- they receive less attention. While this also reduces the costs (at least on paper) since less time is spent on it, it also reduces the quality of the product, which makes the Mac port less attractive. Thus, again: Windows isn't just more common, the games also work better...

Things are even worse for Linux games: Mac people are basically people who don't mind shelling out a lot of money for design gadgets or having a mostly useless computer with an illuminated Apple logo because it's considered to be a cool thing to have. Linux people, on the other hand, don't like "paying" at all... so while all of the above applies as well, plus increased development efforts (= costs) due to the fragmented platform, you will also have problems getting them to actually BUY something.
>is stupid
>knows nothing of game dev
umpa_ndt Oct 5, 2013 @ 1:51am 
I don’t know anything about programming, I am here because I bought a mac update bundle and it had this game with it. I did not realise it was a steam game, and I did not realise that steam is NOT a platform - simply a front end. I'm pretty disappointed in the amount of MAC games. On the plus side I can emulate windows very well, well enough to play most windows games with no noticeable difference. So when I think about it Having a mac gives me 3 systems in one, Windows, Linux & Mac, so a mac a good thing to have.
Shufflecake Holmes Oct 5, 2013 @ 1:55am 
Originally posted by umpa_ndt:
I did not realise it was a steam game, and I did not realise that steam is NOT a platform
Not a platform yet. http://store.steampowered.com/livingroom/
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Date Posted: Oct 2, 2013 @ 10:16pm
Posts: 8