Shade_Koopa Jan 30, 2013 @ 12:16am
Cyber Power PC: Worth the buy?
Looking to get a gaming Desktop. I have about a 1500 dollar to spend, maybe able to stretch it to 2000 if needed. I setup the specs and would like to know if it's a good deal and worth getting.

Desktop Specs:
http://www.cyberpowerpc.com/system/Gamer_Xtreme_4000
(Had to link, to long to copy/paste)

Would this be worth getting? Don't plan to buy right away since technology is always changing. Nvidia suppose to have some new GPU this year so this system may go down in price.

Showing 1-9 of 9 comments
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bvguthrie Jan 30, 2013 @ 12:22am 
I'm not an expert, but I can tell you that you don't need an i7 processor for gaming--its features are only needed for video editing and that sort of thing. An i5 3570k is plenty.
Shade_Koopa Jan 30, 2013 @ 12:30am 
I'm abit tech savvy and have a few tech savvy friends, they all said to go for an I7 as it will last a lot longer in the long run. But again, like to get as much advice as I can before I make the buy.
Last edited by Shade_Koopa; Jan 30, 2013 @ 12:30am
banzaigtv Jan 30, 2013 @ 1:26am 
If you get an i7, then you can benefit from faster clock speeds and have better performance in video editing, photoshop, music mixing, etc. available to you whenever you need it.
rad87gn Jan 30, 2013 @ 7:31am 
I have a i7 3770k. Nice processor. Doesn't hurt to have an i7.
nroque Jan 30, 2013 @ 9:13am 
If you have 1500$ to spend i recommend a better GPU, 670 is the best bang of the buck, and an 120GB SSD as your primary drive. 3770k won't hurt your system and makes it more future-proof. The power supply MUST be from a good vendor or it can damage your system.
Shade_Koopa Feb 2, 2013 @ 12:15am 
Originally posted by nroque:
If you have 1500$ to spend i recommend a better GPU, 670 is the best bang of the buck, and an 120GB SSD as your primary drive. 3770k won't hurt your system and makes it more future-proof. The power supply MUST be from a good vendor or it can damage your system.

I thought the GTX690 was the best Nvidia had? Also, what power supply should I get then? The one I picked is from cooing master, which I though was pretty good.
gnoj Feb 2, 2013 @ 1:32am 
The GTX 690 is technically their best card, but since it's oh-so-expensive, it's not really recommended or discussed unless you want to max out every game at resolutions greater than 1200p (e.g. 2560x1600), or are running a dual/tri monitor setup. Such is the case with dual-GPU video cards, which the 690 is (it's basically two 680's slightly underclocked and sandwiched together). The best single-GPU card from Nvidia is the GTX 680. It competes with the AMD Radeon 7970 GHz Edition.

For gaming, no single component is more important than your video card. Therefore, if you have any leftover money at all, invest it in the video card. The 660 Ti or 670 is probably the best bang for the buck and will play most everything at medium-high, but if you want to guarantee max settings @1080p/60Hz/60 fps for the next couple years I'd recommend a 680 or 7970. Specifically, a friend of mine recently purchased this[www.newegg.com] one and is very happy with it. Runs cool and quiet despite coming slightly factory-overclocked, and has presented absolutely no problems in the ~6 months he's had it.

If necessary to get the better card, it is perfectly acceptable to get an i5-3570K instead of the i7-3770K. If you can get the i7, great, it will give a small boost in other multithreaded tasks like video editing, but will have absolutely no discernible advantage in games. Either way, make sure you get the -K edition so you can (carefully!) take advantage of their inherent overclocking headroom.

The most recommended setup right now is a large (1-2TB) hard drive and small (128-256GB) SSD for Windows and your apps. If you have the room and budget for both (or just a large SSD), go for it! SSD's are great. But if you only get one now get the 1TB hdd (preferably WD Caviar Black) and add the SSD when they get a little cheaper (Micron/Crucial has the 1TB M500 coming out in a few weeks for $599). The most well-regarded SSDs right now are the Crucial M4 (soon to be replaced with the M500), Samsung 840 Pro, OCZ Vector, and Plextor M5. All are great so just get the cheapest one for the size you need and can afford.

You can never have too much RAM, although 16GB should be enough for the forseeable future. Anything above 1866Mhz is a waste; DDR3-1600 is the sweet spot. RAM is criminally cheap at the moment.

Unless you plan to run Crossfire/SLI you don't need a power supply (PSU) large than 750W. If it's cheap enough you can get an 850W for some extra extra headroom, but anything larger is overkill for single-card setups. If you think there is a good chance you will SLI later on (although I would much rather replace the card with the new flagship single-GPU card instead) 1200W is a good bet. Corsair is a good brand.

If you are a college student or know someone who attends/works at a university, you might be able to get a Windows key at a deep discount. At my school I have gotten a couple copies of Windows 7/8 and MS Office Professional Plus for free. MS also have various promotions running right now for Win 8 upgrades.

If you can manage it or find someone to help it's usually best to build the computer yoursef. You save money, learn a lot, and can have fun too. Either way, hope you find great deals for everything! Good luck!


Last edited by gnoj; Feb 2, 2013 @ 1:48am
le Kakka Feb 2, 2013 @ 8:20am 
ummm... no - just build your own for like $300 cheaper. Once you do it the first time its easy as hell every time
Shade_Koopa Feb 3, 2013 @ 12:36am 
Originally posted by =(e)= Kakka Carrot Cake:
ummm... no - just build your own for like $300 cheaper. Once you do it the first time its easy as hell every time

Yeah...sorry, but that sound like it would cost then it sounds. I'm better off just buying my own through cyberpower. Let the experts handle that stuff.

I deal more with software, not hardware.
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Date Posted: Jan 30, 2013 @ 12:16am
Posts: 9