SKaREO (Banned) Mar 23, 2013 @ 9:00pm
Thoughts on the Early Access Feature
What are the benefits of the new Early Access feature? From a marketing and sales perspective, it helps reduce the costs and liabilities of producing new games while simultaneously increasing post-purchase rationalization in the customers. This in turn tempts the new customers to seek out reassurance from their peers, and drives a much stronger word-of-mouth campaign despite whatever downfalls may be present in the early stages of development.

Customers become the investors, play testers, and sales people, all the while footing the bill for the development costs with a smile. Game develoeprs win, and the customer gives up their right to a finished product with at least a basic form of tangibility. A new precedent is set and we can expect to see games for sale at full price before they are even finished.

The Video Game Industry: Suicide by Greed
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Gus the Crocodile Mar 23, 2013 @ 9:12pm 
Give up their right to a finished product with a basic form of tangibility? What? You never had such a right. People put things up for sale and you can take it or leave it. It sounds like you'd rather leave it in the case of early access games, and that's your right, but it doesn't imply there's any kind of problem. If you don't want to be an investor....then don't!

Similarly, there is no such thing as "full price". There is just the price that the creators choose to charge at that point in time. That isn't some kind of constant.

But sure, okay, let's take your suggestions and go back to publishers being the sole gatekeepers of game content. That's so much better.
SKaREO (Banned) Mar 23, 2013 @ 9:17pm 
It is the equivalent of paying someone else to do their work for them. It's outrageous that customers are willing to throw their rights away for such a trivial thing as 'early access.' What ever happened to being entitled to a finished product that you can later resell if you wanted to? Anyone remember buy and selling old Nintendo games? Remember going to Gamestop to trade in some old games to buy a new game that is complete and free of bugs? Yeah, say goodbye to those days.
Τhe Rolling Christmas Tree Mar 23, 2013 @ 9:33pm 
Originally posted by SKaREO:
It is the equivalent of paying someone else to do their work for them. It's outrageous that customers are willing to throw their rights away for such a trivial thing as 'early access.' What ever happened to being entitled to a finished product that you can later resell if you wanted to? Anyone remember buy and selling old Nintendo games? Remember going to Gamestop to trade in some old games to buy a new game that is complete and free of bugs? Yeah, say goodbye to those days.

For a minute there I thought we were in the 90s. It's the digital age, get with the program. Selling expensive as hell games back to gamestop is the thing of the past, buying cheap games that will be with you for the foreseeable future is the future.

Gone are the days where publishers have total reign over the gaming market, it's the era where anyone can be a developer, and anyone can make a masterpiece.
Last edited by Τhe Rolling Christmas Tree; Mar 23, 2013 @ 9:35pm
Gus the Crocodile Mar 23, 2013 @ 9:38pm 
Customers aren't throwing any rights away, they're making a purchasing decision that you wouldn't personally make. You have a choice, as those other people do, and you both can exercise those choices in different directions. There's no problem there.

"Remember being entitled to a finished product?" No, because we never were. We were entitled to what we agreed to pay for.If that was a finished product, great, if it wasn't, also great. As long as people understand what they're buying, everything is fine.

Trading second hand games is a completely separate issue. Digital accounts killed that, not crowd-funding or "early access". You're just on a silly omnidirectional rant if you want to bring that complaint in too.

Do you even understand that these early access games will be available for "normal" sale once they're deemed complete? If you prefer to buy them that way, nobody's taking that away from you.
Last edited by Gus the Crocodile; Mar 23, 2013 @ 9:39pm
Mr.Fishy Mar 23, 2013 @ 9:43pm 
Originally posted by SKaREO:
What are the benefits of the new Early Access feature? From a marketing and sales perspective, it helps reduce the costs and liabilities of producing new games while simultaneously increasing post-purchase rationalization in the customers. This in turn tempts the new customers to seek out reassurance from their peers, and drives a much stronger word-of-mouth campaign despite whatever downfalls may be present in the early stages of development.

Customers become the investors, play testers, and sales people, all the while footing the bill for the development costs with a smile. Game develoeprs win, and the customer gives up their right to a finished product with at least a basic form of tangibility. A new precedent is set and we can expect to see games for sale at full price before they are even finished.

The Video Game Industry: Suicide by Greed
Skareo, I have seen you post around these discussions before but this is by far the worst I've ever disagreed with you. Early Access is a full on, 100% choice. So is play testing and word of mouth. You could simply buy the game at the lesser early access price then wait to play until it's 100% or better yet play it but don't give feedback or share opinions with your friends. A lot of people do exactly this and you would actually be shocked at the number of accounts downloaded a game compared to how many people on the game discussions.
SKaREO (Banned) Mar 24, 2013 @ 12:15am 
The only thing repeated over and over by the opposition in this thread is the most obvious anecdote. I realize I have a choice whether or not I support this by avoiding it. I'm pointing out a new precedent that is being set by people accepting this kind of consumerist business pracitce. Over and over again the customers in this industry are forfeiting their rights to a fair service and get shafted by an industry of chimps in suits.
Last edited by SKaREO; Mar 24, 2013 @ 12:17am
Gus the Crocodile Mar 24, 2013 @ 12:36am 
People making subjective decisions about value that you wouldn't make isn't a new precedent. Nothing unfair is happening - if people agreed with you, they wouldn't be spending money this way.
Mivo Mar 24, 2013 @ 9:51am 
Alpha and pre-alpha crowd funding is not a new concept. It is just new on Steam. It is win-win for both developers and gamers, and of course it is optional. I only fund pre-release games that I would also consider pre-ordering, so there is no downside for me at all. I certainly feel no obligation to properly test games. I might post the occasional bug report or feedback, but I don't do unpaid QA work (and no one expects it anyway).

I prefer early access over traditional pre-ordering by a mile.
da'Ritz Mar 24, 2013 @ 9:57am 
Honestly I'm becoming alarmed seeing more and more early access titles with price tags at very early stages in development. Until now I thought it was a good idea, just browsing through I suddenly got this feeling that the whole thing will blow up soon and leave alot of people very angry...
Τhe Rolling Christmas Tree Mar 24, 2013 @ 10:01am 
Originally posted by da'Ritz:
Honestly I'm becoming alarmed seeing more and more early access titles with price tags at very early stages in development. Until now I thought it was a good idea, just browsing through I suddenly got this feeling that the whole thing will blow up soon and leave alot of people very angry...

How is that any different from the current wave of terrible release day games like Walking Dead: Survival Instincts, Legends of Pegasus, Aliens: Colonial Marines, Sword of the Stars 2, etc.
Bikes Mar 24, 2013 @ 10:02am 
Pre-ordering has existed for ages. It's basically the same thing but you get to play the game while it's being made. If anything it's a step up, the only risk is that it's mostly indy devs doing it who are much more likely to run into problems.
Julia Mar 24, 2013 @ 10:21am 
Minecraft. That's all there is to say. Minecraft.
sargosis Apr 10, 2013 @ 4:55pm 
So...croudfunding on Kickstarter and other sites have a list of consumer rights and responsibilities, and they clearly spell out what the developers have a responsibiliity to do.

Where is that information for steam? Let's say I want to get an early access game, and they turn out to be a scam, who defines what happens? Steam? the developer? Where is that information located so things can be more clearly known? Terms of usage? License material? Is there even anything?
Τhe Rolling Christmas Tree Apr 14, 2013 @ 9:17am 
Originally posted by TheBDK:
It's been done for ages, Valve just placed themselves in the middle for more profits.
Go buy directly from the developer instead. Their game will end up on steam anyway, along with every other indie game these days.

No steam no buy.
Angmar Apr 14, 2013 @ 12:43pm 
Buying and playing an unfinished product, just like most official releases?
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Date Posted: Mar 23, 2013 @ 9:00pm
Posts: 56