S-T Mar 22, 2013 @ 5:54pm
I'd like to see some accountability for Early Access developers
I'd like to see some more requirements for Early Access games. Ideally, they should be required to keep to a specific update cycle, and provide regular RELEASE DATE updates. They should also be required to issue refunds if the game isn't completed.
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Gus the Crocodile Mar 22, 2013 @ 6:23pm 
A specific update cycle? Seriously? No way, let them develop their game in whatever way works for them, we shouldn't be tying people down with conditions like that (especially since even the best plans go wrong now and then). If you're that unsure about the developer, maybe just...don't invest in the game until it's done?
aiusepsi Mar 22, 2013 @ 6:29pm 
Why? If you're unhappy at the thought of buying incomplete games, you have a pretty effective remedy; don't buy them until they're done.

Putting in restrictions like the ones you suggest is not only pointless, it's unworkable.

For instance, what counts as an update sufficient for judging if a developer has hit the cycle or not? Who decides? What's the penalty for not hitting the cycle? If it's forfeiture of revenue, it'll be awesome when the first company goes under because they couldn't hit an arbitrary update cycle.

Then comes the real kicker: why would anybody join the Early Access program if it would tie their hands so awfully? They'd stick to what they were doing before: selling on their own websites.
Tito Christmas Mar 23, 2013 @ 4:42am 
You already know what you are paying for on the Early access games.

If anything, i'd like to see some accountability for Big budget AAA game developers.
Spending millions on releasing a $60 piece of software that crashes on sight for most of their customers (I'm looking at you BLOPS2 and Sim City) should really be punished. Not a small developer that delays his next Beta update two months.
L-r | Canti Mar 23, 2013 @ 4:55am 
No accountability needed, just don't pay for early access games unless you are sure you want to take the risk :). It's no different than Kickstarter, really. You are buying an unfinished game, you are getting what it says on the tin, whether you want to gamble on them finishing it is your call ;). Me personally, I won't be buying any of them unless I see one that really grabs me!
Dreakon Mar 23, 2013 @ 6:09am 
♥♥♥♥ that ♥♥♥♥.

I'd like to see some accountability from the customers. People so haphazardly throw their money around these days that I literally feel no sympathy for someone who buys a game and it either isn't what they expected, or they have some issue that's very obviously because their computers cannot handle the game. Especially in the case of Early Access where any remotely intelligent human being understands the risks associated with it. Reviews (user and critic), previews, gameplay videos... it's literally seconds and a handful of clicks away at any given time.

People complaining because Tomb Raider is a reboot. People complaining because Resident Evil 6 is exactly like Resident Evil 5 (aka, not like the old RE games). People complaining because Trials Evolution Gold Edition doesn't work on their integrated graphics cards.

Not only do people want to be protected from themselves, but they actually expect it. It's a companies job to stretch the truth as far as they can and sell their product. It's our job to make sure those that suck at it get punished with weak sales.

Seriously, we're raising pretty much the dumbest, most entitled generation yet when it comes to money. And the internet/online shopping makes it so easy for them to be that way.
Last edited by Dreakon; Mar 23, 2013 @ 6:24am
Mivo Mar 24, 2013 @ 9:41am 
I think that if games are actually abandoned before release, refunds would not be an unreasonable expectation. Kickstarter, for example, does hold project leaders accountable if they run with the money. That said, I do not feel it is likely that devs of early access games drop their titles, so the discussion is probably overly hypothetical.
L-r | Canti Mar 24, 2013 @ 9:55am 
Kickstarter holds them accountable, yes, but they do not give refunds.

Same goes for Steam, in that they need to agree to a ToS before submitting their game.
Bikes Mar 24, 2013 @ 10:00am 
Originally posted by Dreakon:
♥♥♥♥ that ♥♥♥♥.

I'd like to see some accountability from the customers. People so haphazardly throw their money around these days that I literally feel no sympathy for someone who buys a game and it either isn't what they expected, or they have some issue that's very obviously because their computers cannot handle the game. Especially in the case of Early Access where any remotely intelligent human being understands the risks associated with it. Reviews (user and critic), previews, gameplay videos... it's literally seconds and a handful of clicks away at any given time.

People complaining because Tomb Raider is a reboot. People complaining because Resident Evil 6 is exactly like Resident Evil 5 (aka, not like the old RE games). People complaining because Trials Evolution Gold Edition doesn't work on their integrated graphics cards.

Not only do people want to be protected from themselves, but they actually expect it. It's a companies job to stretch the truth as far as they can and sell their product. It's our job to make sure those that suck at it get punished with weak sales.

Seriously, we're raising pretty much the dumbest, most entitled generation yet when it comes to money. And the internet/online shopping makes it so easy for them to be that way.

More or less this, people really should use the research tools they have instead of always just blindly buying games on hype. As for early access, unless it becomes a reoccurring issue that devs run off with money I don't mind, I've bought alpha games before and I know what to expect. (Owned Minecraft since alpha and bought project zomboid like a year ago)
Τhe Rolling Christmas Tree Mar 24, 2013 @ 10:03am 
They already owe it to the community for completing the game. Failing to do so can result in a public relations disaster so large that the dev responsible will never be able to successfully sell another software for as long as they live.

If others don't drag the devs name through the mud for failing the community, I will.

So devs that plan to abuse early access then run with the money, watch yourself.
Last edited by Τhe Rolling Christmas Tree; Mar 24, 2013 @ 10:05am
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Date Posted: Mar 22, 2013 @ 5:54pm
Posts: 9