=Jumbo_Grill= Mar 6 @ 9:42pm
Region Locking and the Community's feedback.
EDIT: This has been changed by valve. Now, the mere restriction is that these games can only be added to your library if you're in the country with the currency you're paying with.
Last edited by =Jumbo_Grill=; Aug 5 @ 6:03pm
Showing 1-15 of 110 comments
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2point4 Mar 6 @ 10:06pm 
Someone should have asked this question during the weak AMA Valve did on reddit the other day...not that they would have answered it. They were only taking the softball questions on.

You could probably ask support but they'll probably tell you it was a publisher decision, thus distancing themselves from the fact that they enabled this all to happen.
Radical_Buddhist_Gamer Mar 6 @ 10:33pm 
Buisnesses are in the Buisness to server and make a profit. If Valve is doing this, they have a good reason because I doubt they want to actually block publishers from making money because that also makes them money.
Their reasons may not be explained to us.

Maybe it's exchange rates ( $.$$ ) could have something to do with that.
Τhe Rolling Christmas Tree Mar 6 @ 11:30pm 
Blame all the silly traders for trying to profit off cheap games. I don't even trade often and I can see how much abuse is going on.
Anon Mar 6 @ 11:56pm 
I really don't like region locking either. Digital game purchases should not have any kind of region locking or other restrictions on them.
The only thing I say I'd love being able to purchase ROW version (at the according price) for any game.

For example, if Call of Duty: Black Ops II costs 60 USD in America and I live in Brasil, I'd like to purchase a ROW version (assuming american version are ROW) for 140 BRL (~60 USD) instead of the "normal" BR version for 110 BRL (~47 USD), and have a copy that works everywhere* in the world.

* I reckon that prices aside certain countries could enforce content distribution nonetheless, such as low violence versions (e.g. if I play my ROW copy L4D2 while I'm temporarily in Australia I may have it censored) or straight unplayable (if the region forbids the distribution of that very game).
Black Blade Mar 7 @ 5:43am 
Well as much as i know its more something related to the Publisher that allows or not the selling of the game here or there.....
Valve gives the tools for it.. ya... but in the end the one with the keys are the publisher and some time the government of the country that blocks the game

I just trying to understand why it seem like you saying Valve is doing it.. when from what i understand its more something to ask the publisher
Last edited by Black Blade; Mar 7 @ 5:44am
Satoru Mar 7 @ 6:06am 
Publishers set the region locks
Satoru Mar 7 @ 6:35am 
Originally posted by 2point4:
You could probably ask support but they'll probably tell you it was a publisher decision

And it is. It's not magic.

, thus distancing themselves from the fact that they enabled this all to happen.

Steam didn't invent region locking. Publishers wanted it so Steam has to incorporate it into the infrastructure or publishers would simply not sell their products on Steam. That's just as ludicrous as the claim that Steam 'enables' high game prices in Australia
404: gamer not found Mar 7 @ 6:49am 
technicaly it is anti-conpettative to do so.
but no one ever stops it. capitalism rolls on, deal with it or get out of the way i suppose -shrug-
crunchyfrog Mar 7 @ 11:42am 
How on earth do you expect Valve to do anything about this?

The publishers/devs own their games in entirety - Valve have NO ABILITY to say "change your prices, region locks" or anything else for that matter. They can ask, they can suggest (and I'm sure they already do, as their contracts have such info in), but that is as far as it could ever go.

Why do so many people think Valve are the World Police and the ombudsman to all marketing and licencing too?

Originally posted by ☠ ''empes'' ☠:
technicaly it is anti-conpettative to do so.
but no one ever stops it. capitalism rolls on, deal with it or get out of the way i suppose -shrug-

I think you mean "anti-competitive". Actually, that isn't what anti-competitive means. It is the means to RESTRICT an rival's opportunity to market, NOT restrict THEMSELVES from a market.

I'm sorry, it's yet another silly internet myth.
Last edited by crunchyfrog; Mar 7 @ 11:45am
=Jumbo_Grill= Mar 7 @ 2:22pm 
It's just too strange for this massive region lock to come crashing down so suddenly. Several articles around the web say that this wasn't a policy enforced by publishers, claiming that Valve was the one to retroactively lock these games in order to crack down on trading.

The Valve I used to know wouldn't harm a majority of players like this in order to contain mere traders, is what I'm saying.
Satoru Mar 7 @ 3:12pm 
Originally posted by =Jumbo_Grill=:
It's just too strange for this massive region lock to come crashing down so suddenly. Several articles around the web say that this wasn't a policy enforced by publishers, claiming that Valve was the one to retroactively lock these games in order to crack down on trading.

Refernces before making broad claims

The Valve I used to know wouldn't harm a majority of players like this in order to contain mere traders, is what I'm saying.

Again why make a policy that's inconsistently applied. Most of the stuff on steam isn't region restricted to BR. SOme AAA stuff is but that's it. Heck many top sellers on Steam aren't region locked. If Steam wanted to 'cut down on trading' why apply that policy in such an inconsistent way. Just make EVERYTHING non-tradeable in BR. Why do this weird, maybe-yes-maybe-no-maybe-sorta-idontknow policy.

In fact why not do that in Russia where games are even cheaper? It's not like BR is the first kid on the block with the whole 'cant run this in this region' deal.

Again if it was a 'Valve' policy they'd jsut apply it across the board. WHy bother with 'oh YOU get to trade but you on the other hand don't' Why make these seemingly arbitrary choices? Some AAA is, others not. Or is it perhaps more consistent with a bunch of disparate companies making individual decisions on region locking that causes this fragmented 'policy'.
Last edited by Satoru; Mar 7 @ 3:13pm
Spawn of Totoro Mar 7 @ 4:18pm 
Originally posted by =Jumbo_Grill=:
http://awildpodcastappears.com/2013/12/steam-may-region-lock-gifting/
"This seemingly suggest that certain games (most likely at the publishers discretion) will not be eligible for gifting and trading across regions; such as from NA to the EU."
Originally posted by =Jumbo_Grill=:
http://www.rockpapershotgun.com/2013/12/23/steam-allows-publishers-to-disable-cross-region-gifting/
"Well, relish the convenience while you can, because Valve’s added an option for developers and publishers to disallow cross-region gifting and trading."
-----
They seem to contain the same idea as what Satoru had said:
Originally posted by Satoru:
Publishers set the region locks
They also seem to show the opposite of:
Originally posted by =Jumbo_Grill=:
Several articles around the web say that this wasn't a policy enforced by publishers
-----
Originally posted by =Jumbo_Grill=:
http://www.neogaf.com/forum/showthread.php?t=737020
"And Valve can't override this, right? Since it's up to the publisher."

"Typical publishers, ruining a good thing."
-----
Even in the thread, some are pointing out that fact.

As for those arguing in that thread that Valve didn't even have to create this feature, that probably isn't true. If they didn't, then the developers would have likely pulled out of Steam leaving people with little to no games to buy.

Despite some people's idea on the matter, Valve can't force others to do something, especially if they view it as a potential loss of profits.

Take EA for example, they left due to Valve demanding publishers sell their DLC through Steam. EA was also the only ones selling DLC in such a manner. Even Ubisoft could leave at any moment as they already have their own store and DRM system set up. It is much easier to make a digital distribution store then a retail store.

If the developers/publisher demanded that Valve add region-locking, then they would have to do so. They are, after all, a business. Unfortunately they are in a precarious position. They have two sets of customers, Developers/Publisher and the Users.
-----
Digital Distribution is still a new and growing market. This issue wasn't around before since physical media was required and didn't cross borders as easily or as quickly as this new way of selling does.

They are trying to bring something similar to to digital stores as already exist with the physical ones. I'm sure we would all love to pay Russian prices, but then we wouldn't have any more games since the Developer/Publishers would most likely shut down due to not making any money. That or poorer regions wouldn't be able to afford any games.
Last edited by Spawn of Totoro; Mar 7 @ 4:24pm
Satoru Mar 7 @ 4:29pm 
Originally posted by =Jumbo_Grill=:
Originally posted by Satoru:
Refernces before making broad claims

http://www.rockpapershotgun.com/2013/12/23/steam-allows-publishers-to-disable-cross-region-gifting/

http://awildpodcastappears.com/2013/12/steam-may-region-lock-gifting/

http://raptr.com/ED13/news/5306d3b67e194e7ed3/news-steam-region-locks-games-retroactively-interactive-daylight-scares-xbox-update-preview

And finally I'm following this thread:

http://www.neogaf.com/forum/showthread.php?t=737020

Well there you have it.

All those articles say "here is a new feature steam rolled out to prevent cross region trading of a agme" which so far has only ever applied to pre-orders for a handful of games. This is a far cry from the claim of 'Valve was the one to retroactively lock these games in order to crack down on trading.'

Again there is a difference between "steam giving publishers tools to region lock games" vs "Steam is unilaterally enforcing a policy to prevent game trading without the publishers permission"
Last edited by Satoru; Mar 7 @ 4:31pm
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Date Posted: Mar 6 @ 9:42pm
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