ATTAYA May 10 @ 5:28pm
"Skyrim and the like" Computer Build Question
Hello,

I'm building my first computer this summer, and in preparing/researching I've come across a couple processor questions. I'm looking at parts on newegg, and processors seem to vary in price quite a bit. Could someone with more tec knowlege than myself, explain to me the difference between a 300-400 dollar intel processor and a 1000 dollar one?

Please and thank you!
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Alkpaz May 10 @ 9:25pm 
I used to use SETI back in the late 90s.. kinda got bored with it. Had nice graphs though! :P

As for the 1K processors I feel it was worth every penny. I bought mine in 2010 i7 980x (first 6 core + HT) (12 logical processors) still stock at 3.33Ghz. And I recently compared it to the top of the line extreme one and it is still darn good.

"The Core i7-4960X 6-Core was released over three years more recently than the Core i7-980X 6-Core, and so the Core i7-4960X 6-Core is likely to have far better levels of support, and will be much more optimized and ultimately superior to the Core i7-980X 6-Core when running the latest games.

Both CPUs exhibit very powerful performance, so it probably isn't worth upgrading from one to the other, as both are capable of running even the most demanding games at the highest settings (assuming they are accompanied by equivalently powerful GPUs). "

http://www.game-debate.com/cpu/index.php?pid=1295&pid2=483&compare=core-i7-4960x-6-core-3-60ghz-vs-core-i7-980x-6-core-3-33ghz

I recently checked to see if I wanted to upgrade to the latest 1K processor.. I guess I don't really have to yet. ;) There were other benchmarks but none that told me point blank if I "needed" to upgrade from my current processor.

Anyone who says that extreme processors "are not worth it" never had one, or if they did, they had a cheapo mobo paired with it.

As for the current extreme processor, I would wait..and buy the first one released from the current one: 4960x (2013 release is kinda old, Intel may just pull out another one pretty soon here)

My vid card right now is a first release PNY GTX 680. I checked out the Titan and GTX 780ti and they both are pretty comparible, but it would only net me about 20FPS more on avg. Not really worth it right now for me either. Although the Titan Z is a monster and its price is just insane.

http://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/why-nvidias-3000-titan-z-graphics-card-isnt-crazy/#!L58QF

"However, Nvidia did say that the Titan Z will feature the same 7GHz GDDR5 video memory as the Titan Black and GTX 780 Ti cards, running across two 384-bit buses. Plus, because the card is essentially two GTX Titan Blacks in one, there will be a massive 12GB of that speedy memory on the board."

Personally, I would wait on the GTX 880s to release. ;)

Just seems like its the end of this generation of i7s and video cards, a little late to be thinkin about upgrading, even though I wanted to upgrade myself. :/
Last edited by Alkpaz; May 10 @ 9:45pm
Alkpaz May 10 @ 9:32pm 
If aliens come Hamster n they end up destroying humanity, I will blame you.. :P
Last edited by Alkpaz; May 10 @ 9:33pm
crapmonster May 10 @ 9:49pm 
This applies to most things but especially true with computer components. As you get higher in price, the gains exponentially diminish.

If you are just gaming, there is absolutely no reason to spend that much money on a CPU. The only component you should drop huge dollars on is the GPU. I've been running an i5-2500k for several years now and have had no issues with it. Its stayed in my system while Ive upgraded my GPU several times during the same period.
Alkpaz May 10 @ 9:50pm 
^^ prolly have a nice mobo paired with that i5.. ;)

Most processors do VERY well with a good motherboard and PSU, and slack there n you will see drops in performance. RAM can go 1066+ in speed and have almost no difference. GPU is what does count in gaming, but if your CPU/mobo can't keep up your SOL. (much of this depends on the PCI-E speed currently 3.0) "PCI Express 3.1 is scheduled to be released in late 2013 or early 2014, making various tweaks to the published standard"

"PCI Express 4.0

On November 29, 2011, PCI-SIG announced PCI Express 4.0 featuring 16 GT/s, still based on copper technology. Additionally, active and idle power optimizations are to be investigated. Final specifications are expected to be released in 2014 or 2015."

Essentially, if you buy now, you will not have access to PCI-E 4.0 which will kick up the power of your system. I would definately wait... ;)

"v3.0: 985 MB/s (8 GT/s)
v4.0: 1969 MB/s (16 GT/s)"

I did some digging:

"We have put forth a great effort to get to the bottom of the PCIe 2.0 versus PCIe 3.0 debate. We put a lot of time into testing performance and verifying that our data is accurate. Except for a couple of specific scenarios, most of the performance advantage had under PCIe 3.0 was well under 10%. This actually falls in-line with the kind of performance advantages one might expect using n Ivy Bridge CPU clock-for-clock compared to a Sandy Bridge CPU. The IPC can affect performance by as much as 4-7% in favor of Ivy Bridge easily. As you noticed, most of our data when we experienced an improvement on the Ivy Bridge system was in this range of improvements. There were a few specific cases of 11% in The Witcher 2 in one test, and 19% in Batman (for part of the game only) and 14% when we cranked up the settings to unplayable levels in Max Payne 3. For the most part, at the real-world highest playable settings we found playable, all performance advantages were under 10%."

"Think about it like this, in a bandwidth starved situation, PCIe 3.0 will more likely show a performance benefit over PCIe 2.0. However, when bandwidth is not starved, and not an issue, then aspects like timings and latencies play a role in performance. We may be seeing some of this where bandwidth isn't an issue. In most cases, it appeared that bandwidth was not a major issue in any of these games."

So PCI-E 3.0 will be a safe choice, so you COULD get one now, or just wait for the PCI-E 4.0 to release, which will have new boards and possibly new processors to go with it. (AMD will do the same)

As a reference to why I buy the way I do, My typical desktop lasts 10yrs. My pricing I set when I bought my Apple IIc which was $1295K USD at release in 1984. If I factor in inflation with that number the Apple IIc would cost today: $2,945.13 USD.

Factor out how much your most expensive PC was in the past and see how much it is worth in today's dollars and you have yourself a "budget". ;)

http://data.bls.gov/cgi-bin/cpicalc.pl

A budget will also net you more answers and alternative builds than one where "the sky's the limit". ;) For me, I can go all out, and can afford to, but not many can, and that is understandable.

Hopefully, I answered your question, if you want specifics or benchmarks between two processors use this as a search key: XXX processor vs XXX processor
Last edited by Alkpaz; May 10 @ 10:34pm
crapmonster May 10 @ 9:53pm 
Nothing special, I have yet to even overclock it yet....
mpd1958 May 11 @ 2:04am 
Intel i5 Quad Core CPU with Nvidia GTX650 Ti Boost GPU and I run High-Ultra setting with no performance problems to date. CPU and GPU combined cost me less than $300.
ATTAYA May 11 @ 6:11pm 
wow! thanks for the info. I guess im decidinb between an intel i5 an i7 for my processor, seems like i can get away with the i5 though?
Alkpaz May 11 @ 9:24pm 
The processor has a launch date of Q3'09 (the mainstay of that generation of i7's was 920 FYI)

http://ark.intel.com/products/41315/Intel-Core-i7-870-Processor-8M-Cache-2_93-GHz

I would go for AT least a Sandybridge line

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandy_Bridge

"released first products based on the architecture in January 2011 under the Core brand"

Ivy Bridge would be your best bet. ;)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivy_Bridge_(microarchitecture)

"Core i7 Ivy Bridge-EX (Ivytown), Ivy Bridge-EP and Ivy Bridge-E microprocessors released in 2013."

Scroll down to: "List of Ivy Bridge processors"

Pick from those n your good to go. ;)
Last edited by Alkpaz; May 11 @ 9:32pm
Frankie-Z- May 11 @ 10:01pm 
Originally posted by mpd1958:
Intel i5 Quad Core CPU with Nvidia GTX650 Ti Boost GPU and I run High-Ultra setting with no performance problems to date. CPU and GPU combined cost me less than $300.

yeah that's pretty much the standard PC gamer set up .. you can go with a AMD FX if you want to be differnt but the I5 is great for gaming .. I7 is better but only if you plan on doing Vid editing doesnt do much more for gaming over the I5 .. AMD has some great GPU's also but the 650ti is the best bet for the money ...
if you have money to burn you can double up on the GPU's and use crossfire or SLI but only a handful of games have good support for crossfire or SLI
Last edited by Frankie-Z-; May 11 @ 10:02pm
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Date Posted: May 10 @ 5:28pm
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