The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim

The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim

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Stoob Apr 5, 2014 @ 6:06am
Query for fellow English speakers (particularly English/British)
My understanding was always:
"Bring that here."
and
"Take that there."
and not
"Bring that there."

In Skyrim (and other games) I've noticed a trend to always use 'bring', and it just sounds wrong. I wondered if it was an Americanisation, or possibly simplification for the non-native English speakers, as 'take' can have other connotations.

Any thoughts anyone?
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I guess they can always bring the issue someplace else :P

Never mind matey...watch a couple of episides of the Young ones and you will feel better :)

Or should that be a couple episodes? <wink>
Last edited by Master Dan [STURMKATTEN]; Apr 5, 2014 @ 6:28am
Americanisation is quite possibly one of the best words ever. :3
Draughir Apr 5, 2014 @ 9:16am 
If I remember my grammar correctly when using 'bring' it should be more personal. As in 'bring it to me'; 'bring him here'

Take should be "Take this to the store." "Take this to the trash."

Sort of how lay is supposed to be for inanimate objects, and lie is for animate objects. "lay that on the table." as opposed to "Why don't you go lie down." Or if you're British "Go have a lie-down." ;)

However, I could be wrong as it's been more than 30 years since I've been in an English Grammar class. ;)
Stoob Apr 5, 2014 @ 9:19am 
Originally posted by Draughir:
If I remember my grammar correctly when using 'bring' it should be more personal. As in 'bring it to me'; 'bring him here'

Take should be "Take this to the store." "Take this to the trash."

That was my general understanding too.

*ahem*
"Take this to the shop."
"Take this to the rubbish."
^^

But yea, generally the difference between 'here' and 'there'. You bring things here, and take things there.
Last edited by Stoob; Apr 5, 2014 @ 9:20am
Draughir Apr 5, 2014 @ 9:25am 
Let's not forget tho, the Nords of Skyrim are cleary speaking English as a second language as they've got some wierd combination of French, German, and Scandinavian accents. Whereas the Elves, seem to be British, and the Dunmer seem to be Australlian. ;)
Stoob Apr 5, 2014 @ 9:26am 
Originally posted by Draughir:
Let's not forget tho, the Nords of Skyrim are cleary speaking English as a second language as they've got some wierd combination of French, German, and Scandinavian accents. Whereas the Elves, seem to be British, and the Dunmer seem to be Australlian. ;)
It's not the accent, it's the dialogue.

Dunmer Australian? The males sound like they're from Yorkshire (apart from the ones that sound like John Hurt), and the females sound like cockneys, particularly in Solthseim.

Oh, and a particular bug-bear of mine: the High Elves sound English, not British. It'd be difficult to sound Scottish, Welsh, N. Irish and English all at the same time.
Last edited by Stoob; Apr 5, 2014 @ 9:30am
Draughir Apr 5, 2014 @ 9:31am 
Ok..you got me there. I get cockney and aussie mixed up on occasion. I had an advisor in college that started teaching me Cockney Rhyme..but being American, I couldn't really grasp it properly. lol.
And having never been to Yorkshire, I have no idea what a Yorkshirian? Yorkshirer? Yorkshire Native? lol sounds like as compared to other British denizens.

Originally posted by Lord Noob of Noobshire:

Oh, and a particular bug-bear of mine: the High Elves sound English, not British. It'd be difficult to sound Scottish, Welsh, N. Irish and English all at the same time.

Good point. I should have recognized that. My apologies. :)
Last edited by Draughir; Apr 5, 2014 @ 9:35am
bobczes Apr 5, 2014 @ 9:33am 
"In order to employ proper usage of “bring” or “take,” the writer must know whether the object is being moved toward or away from the subject. If it is toward, use “bring.” If it is away, use “take.” e.g., Bring that here. e.g., Take that there. Your spouse may tell you to “take your clothes to the cleaners.” The owner of the dry cleaners would say “bring your clothes to the cleaners.”

http://081888.info/post/16858279980/20-common-grammar-mistakes-that-almost-everyone-gets

Why do grammar mistakes occur ?

“All languages change all the time — it’s not just English — and people have been complaining about changes in languages for as long as they’ve been changing, which is forever,” said Alice Harris, a professor of linguistics at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/alisongriswold/2012/06/22/your-bad-grammar-at-work-whats-the-problem/
Draughir Apr 5, 2014 @ 9:39am 
Thanks for the links! ~puts on his language nerd hat and reads~
Draughir was stunningly accurate actually, regarding Australian accents LOL!

It is the voice actor for The Burning Man in Fallout: NV, 'Joshua Graham', who he is refering to I believe ... He is an American, who tries to do an English accent from watching Mary Poppins and Chitty Chitty Bang Bang hahahahaha! but his attampt at cockney kinda comes out Aussie hehee :D

I think the real annoyance in changes in launguage is when I find the scentence:
''How to do this/that?''

I seem to be overcome by a homicidal urge to hunt the typist down and remove them from this mortal coil after forcing them to complete a ''say after me'' scenario, upon which their head is then removed from their body; their corpse cleft in twain. My manic laughter - once more allowed to reign...Their folly ways never to repeat again! Doctor, do you think I am insane?
Last edited by Master Dan [STURMKATTEN]; Apr 5, 2014 @ 9:59am
gnewna Apr 5, 2014 @ 10:13am 
(it was Lord Noob, I deleted too much)


Oh, and a particular bug-bear of mine: the High Elves sound English, not British. It'd be difficult to sound Scottish, Welsh, N. Irish and English all at the same time.

Well, if we're going to be picky, they sound like an attempt at R.P. English, aka "posh London" - actually possibly their pronunciation is a little too modern for R.P. But English isn't really an accent any more than British, especially if you go back fifty years or so when there were clearly identifiable accents from town to town, whereas now much of the South East is sort of Generically East London (not quite the same as Cockney, which tbh barely exists any more outside Pearly Kings and Queens).

I like the Dunmer VAs' attempts at a bit of a range of pseudo-English accents and don't mind that some of them (*cough* Brand-Shei) are not really very good because they aren't *meant* to be from Bethnal Green or Keighley (pronounced "Keith-ley", IIRC), they're just meant to sound like they're from different areas of a given country, I think.

Oh, and quite a few of the Dunmer sound more convincingly aristocratic English than the Altmer, IMO - compare Jenassa to Niranye or Endarie.

(Sidebar - I suppose RP is *meant* to be a Generic English Accent rather than those yucky regional ones, but in practice it was pretty much the promotion of the middle to upper class accent in London/the Home Counties to Correct Speech status, as I understand things.)
Last edited by gnewna; Apr 5, 2014 @ 10:21am
Stoob Apr 5, 2014 @ 10:17am 
Originally posted by KL Master Dan StormCats:
I think the real annoyance in changes in launguage is when I find the scentence:
''How to do this/that?''

I seem to be overcome by a homicidal urge to hunt the typist down and remove them from this mortal coil after forcing them to complete a ''say after me'' scenario, upon which their head is then removed from their body; their corpse cleft in twain. My manic laughter - once more allowed to reign...Their folly ways never to repeat again! Doctor, do you think I am insane?
Hehe, we all have personal ones like that, I would think. Poor punctuation is mine. A recent mod I played with had written dialogue and the over-use of commas was so confusing, it became difficult to understand what the hell they meant at times.
Last edited by Stoob; Apr 5, 2014 @ 10:18am
my two cents on that guy's accent...I liked his voice in FO NV...like gravel - ooooh yeah :P

(and here I am with cents and dollars in my pocket >.< 'Go figure' hehe)
Last edited by Master Dan [STURMKATTEN]; Apr 5, 2014 @ 10:21am
White Knight Apr 5, 2014 @ 10:25am 
I think the words are largely interchangeable depending upon context. The subject and the location are generally important as "bring" is always a very personal thing. "Take" can be other things but it can also be used much the same way as "bring".

Father says to his son, "Bring this to your mother"

He could just as easily say "Take this to your mother"

Alternatively, if the Father says to his son, "Go to find your mother and bring her purse" that could be taken to mean something very different than "Go find your mother and take her purse".

I'd say they were basically synonyms depending upon the context which they are used.

Language is certainly dynamic and always will be. People change, times change, language changes too.

This is no excuse to simply ignore grammar and spelling or any attempt to communciate well, which happens more and more often on the internet with lazy people who cannot be bothered to make an effort to write clearly.
Zefram Cochrane Apr 5, 2014 @ 12:04pm 
Originally posted by Lord Noob of Noobshire:
My understanding was always:
"Bring that here."
and
"Take that there."
and not
"Bring that there."

In Skyrim (and other games) I've noticed a trend to always use 'bring', and it just sounds wrong. I wondered if it was an Americanisation, or possibly simplification for the non-native English speakers, as 'take' can have other connotations.

Any thoughts anyone?

Can't say I've noticed myself, got any examples? (Dialogue is pretty easy to look up in the Creation Kit)

"Bring that there" is definitely bad grammar, at least it is here, whether grammar rules are different in the US I honestly have no idea


Originally posted by gnewna:
(it was Lord Noob, I deleted too much)


Oh, and a particular bug-bear of mine: the High Elves sound English, not British. It'd be difficult to sound Scottish, Welsh, N. Irish and English all at the same time.

Well, if we're going to be picky, they sound like an attempt at R.P. English, aka "posh London" - actually possibly their pronunciation is a little too modern for R.P. But English isn't really an accent any more than British, especially if you go back fifty years or so when there were clearly identifiable accents from town to town, whereas now much of the South East is sort of Generically East London (not quite the same as Cockney, which tbh barely exists any more outside Pearly Kings and Queens).

I like the Dunmer VAs' attempts at a bit of a range of pseudo-English accents and don't mind that some of them (*cough* Brand-Shei) are not really very good because they aren't *meant* to be from Bethnal Green or Keighley (pronounced "Keith-ley", IIRC), they're just meant to sound like they're from different areas of a given country, I think.

Oh, and quite a few of the Dunmer sound more convincingly aristocratic English than the Altmer, IMO - compare Jenassa to Niranye or Endarie.

(Sidebar - I suppose RP is *meant* to be a Generic English Accent rather than those yucky regional ones, but in practice it was pretty much the promotion of the middle to upper class accent in London/the Home Counties to Correct Speech status, as I understand things.)

The accents, altmer particularly, are a bit ridiculous, but thats a "british" accent to an american. And all the voice actors are american afaik. Its really a mangled variant of upper-class "refined", but they don't know the difference (to be fair there are plenty of Irish accent variants too but could you or I tell the difference?)

I like the Dunmer accents better, they sound more realistic honestly (but no , they're not Australian, lol)

Actually if you don't speak with an RP accent americans think you are actually australian. (Yes, its happened to me too when I've visited the USA. "Gee, that accent, you're australian, right?" )

Never been there in my life, lol. Bless 'em.
Last edited by Zefram Cochrane; Apr 5, 2014 @ 12:25pm
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Date Posted: Apr 5, 2014 @ 6:06am
Posts: 69