rafaelherschel Feb 13 @ 7:56am
Assassin’s Creed: Brotherhood elements in the next single player TES
I just played Assassin’s Creed: Brotherhood and the way the city of Rome is depicted is just brilliant. The city is not just beautifully designed, it’s also bustling with people.

Better yet, there is wide variety of NPC activity, all of it with good animation. The voice acting is also top notch.

I enjoyed giving chase and stumbling on NPC’s having a picnic or walking around and seeing the courtship between two NPC’s.

I would love to see something similar in the next TES single player game. A large urban area that is filled by NPC’ and a wide variety of animation for NPC’s.

Especially if the city is filled with economic opportunities and obscure shops that sell a wide variety items. It would be interesting if the proceeds of adventures could be invested and a player could end up controlling a part of the city.
Last edited by rafaelherschel; Feb 13 @ 4:37pm
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♥ Barney ♥ Feb 13 @ 8:27am 
I agree, i love the way Assassins Creed designed the cities and the number of people in those cities, the animations etc, felt like you were in a real city rather than the emptiness of Skyrim cities. Would be great to incorporate something like that in a future ES game.
Fenyx Feb 13 @ 8:39am 
Unfortunately that will never happen. Where AC series tries to create immersion of social stealth game, TES series seems to succumbing more and more to be MMO-like. Make a huge world to act as background and fill it with generic npcs and quest "go there - bring/kill that". Considering that there is TES Online release on its way, I doubt we will se any meaningfull sp TES game any time soon. Kids nowadays dont care for game atpmosphere and immersion, they want to lvl up.
Last edited by Fenyx; Feb 13 @ 8:40am
rafaelherschel Feb 13 @ 1:24pm 
Originally posted by Fenyx:
Unfortunately that will never happen. Where AC series tries to create immersion of social stealth game, TES series seems to succumbing more and more to be MMO-like. Make a huge world to act as background and fill it with generic npcs and quest "go there - bring/kill that". Considering that there is TES Online release on its way, I doubt we will se any meaningfull sp TES game any time soon. Kids nowadays dont care for game atpmosphere and immersion, they want to lvl up.

I still have high hopes. Sure the next true TES installment might take a while, but Skyrim made an effort to show economic and social diversity.

Perhaps the AC series and the upcoming Witcher 3 game will serve as inspiration.

And Bethesda did take a chance by developing such a large world in the first place. The massive success of Skyrim wasn’t a given.

And to be clear: roaming around in a large world with lots of random quests is exactly what I love about Skyrim :-)
Incunabulum Feb 13 @ 2:08pm 
A huge part of why Skyrim doesn't do that is engine limitations - keep in mind this game was developed with the PS3/XB360 specs in mind, not the average capabilities that PC's had when it was released.

That's why the city assaults in the civil war quest line involve such a paltry number of people in each side.

I expect the next game (which is basically going to be FO4 with TESVI to come out a couple of years afterwards) like this to have more of what you're talking about.

In the meantime you can look up mods like Inconsequential NPC's which add a ton (Imperial, not metric) of new people to wander the cities and towns.
Incunabulum Feb 13 @ 2:10pm 
Originally posted by rafaelherschel:
. . .

And Bethesda did take a chance by developing such a large world in the first place. The massive success of Skyrim wasn’t a given.
. . .

Well, it sort of was. Its in the same line as the massively popular (and far superior) Morrowind adn the massively popular (but far inferior) Oblivion. There just was no way people weren't lining up to throw money at Bethesda for a new one.
rafaelherschel Feb 13 @ 3:55pm 
Originally posted by Incunabulum:
Originally posted by rafaelherschel:
. . .

And Bethesda did take a chance by developing such a large world in the first place. The massive success of Skyrim wasn’t a given.
. . .

Well, it sort of was. Its in the same line as the massively popular (and far superior) Morrowind adn the massively popular (but far inferior) Oblivion. There just was no way people weren't lining up to throw money at Bethesda for a new one.

The actual sales numbers for Skyrim exceed the numbers of Oblivion by a very large margin. Morrowind and Oblivion were popular, but Skyrim was a real breakthrough.

And I remember that people talked about the possibility that Skyrim would be less successful than Oblivion, because the market had changed. The common wisdom just before Skyrim came out, was that the key to a bestseller was multiplayer with a short single player campaign.
Last edited by rafaelherschel; Feb 13 @ 4:36pm
rafaelherschel Feb 13 @ 3:59pm 
Originally posted by Incunabulum:
A huge part of why Skyrim doesn't do that is engine limitations - keep in mind this game was developed with the PS3/XB360 specs in mind, not the average capabilities that PC's had when it was released.

That's why the city assaults in the civil war quest line involve such a paltry number of people in each side.

I expect the next game (which is basically going to be FO4 with TESVI to come out a couple of years afterwards) like this to have more of what you're talking about.

In the meantime you can look up mods like Inconsequential NPC's which add a ton (Imperial, not metric) of new people to wander the cities and towns.

Assassins Creed: Brotherhood is an older console port and still managed to get more NPC's with better animations in the game.

I think it's more a question of the enormous time it takes to develop such a large game. By the time the game is almost finished, technology has moved on and other games have raised the stakes.
Fenyx Feb 13 @ 4:16pm 
Originally posted by Incunabulum:
A huge part of why Skyrim doesn't do that is engine limitations - keep in mind this game was developed with the PS3/XB360 specs in mind, not the average capabilities that PC's had when it was released.

That's why the city assaults in the civil war quest line involve such a paltry number of people in each side.

I expect the next game (which is basically going to be FO4 with TESVI to come out a couple of years afterwards) like this to have more of what you're talking about.

In the meantime you can look up mods like Inconsequential NPC's which add a ton (Imperial, not metric) of new people to wander the cities and towns.

Well, Wars and Warriors Joan of Arc had like 10 times the amount of character in battle, and it was released 10 years ago, so console specs cant be an excuse, not to mention mount&blade series...



Originally posted by rafaelherschel:

The actual sales numbers for Skyrim exceed the numbers of Oblivion by a very large margin. Morrowind and Oblivion where popular, but Skyrim was a real breakthrough.

And I remember that people talked about the possibility that Skyrim would be less successful than Oblivion, because the market had changed. The common wisdom just before Skyrim came out, was that the key to a bestseller was multiplayer with a short single player campaign.
Just prooves a point that gamedev is stagnating coz of posh ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥s with their "market analisys" which is often wrong, and afraid to invest into new and interesting ideas. Another example would be Kingdom Come rpg from Warhorse studios, which got refused by all major publishers basically coz "game lacked dragons and magic and will not be popular and sell well", yet now they got more than double the amount of money they needed from kickstarter, which basically shows that there is good demand for such game (realistic medieval rpg).
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Date Posted: Feb 13 @ 7:56am
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