f.meussen Jun 16 @ 6:04am
Is there a solution for the 120Hz monitors bug yet?
Problem was that physics go crazy if a 120Hz monitor is used and framerate sync would be set to off.
Is this fixed or still a problem?
Showing 1-11 of 11 comments
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MikuCore Jun 16 @ 6:10am 
tunr vsync on, use msi afterburner to set your framerate to 60
f.meussen Jun 16 @ 12:09pm 
i dont want a framerate of 60 if my card / rig can easily handle 120fps ( much smoother as 60 especially during big fights )
can somebody explain me why physics are linked to the fps of a game? isn't this stupid programming? ( should be fps independent )
MikuCore Jun 16 @ 12:10pm 
the engine is framerate dependant.
hardcoded.
ask bethesda for an explanation
Last edited by MikuCore; Jun 16 @ 12:10pm
Beef Hammer Jun 16 @ 1:02pm 
Yea Skyrim does not play well over 60fps, physics go nutty, deal with it.
Dr. Shocks . DO Jun 16 @ 1:21pm 
Originally posted by f.meussen:
i dont want a framerate of 60 if my card / rig can easily handle 120fps ( much smoother as 60 especially during big fights )
can somebody explain me why physics are linked to the fps of a game? isn't this stupid programming? ( should be fps independent )
Ask here: The OFFICIAL Bethesda Forums
http://forums.bethsoft.com/forum/180-pc/

As for ways to remedy the Physics Bug; as what others have pointed out, cap your FPS to 60
Last edited by Dr. Shocks . DO; Jun 16 @ 1:22pm
Zefram Cochrane Jun 16 @ 2:43pm 
Physics calculations are based on framerate. Hard coded. No way to fix it other than rewrite the game code. And bethesda have moved on to other things.

Its not just this game I have several other games with the same thing. 120hz monitors just weren't available, or commonplace at any rate when the game came out And no, Bethesda isn't about to fix it.
Last edited by Zefram Cochrane; Jun 16 @ 3:09pm
Incunabulum Jun 16 @ 5:03pm 
Originally posted by f.meussen:
Problem was that physics go crazy if a 120Hz monitor is used and framerate sync would be set to off.
Is this fixed or still a problem?


Its not a bug, its a deliberate design decision. One of my least favorites, but still.

The only fix is a framerate limiter.
f.meussen Jun 17 @ 3:40am 
well i hope that for their next big Elder Scrolls game they do think about their core fans ( PC ) and dont limit the game to 60fps max ( typical a console decision )
MageThis Jun 17 @ 3:58am 
Originally posted by f.meussen:
well i hope that for their next big Elder Scrolls game they do think about their core fans ( PC ) and dont limit the game to 60fps max ( typical a console decision )
Yeah, but by then you will own a 240Hz 4K monitor and think their 120Hz 120 fps limit is a bug.
Rhuto Jun 17 @ 4:03am 
From Wiki;

A culture of competition has arisen among game enthusiasts with regard to frame rates, with players striving to obtain the highest FPS possible, due to their utility in demonstrating a system's power and efficiency. Indeed, many benchmarks (such as 3DMark) released by the marketing departments of hardware manufacturers and published in hardware reviews focus on the FPS measurement. LCD monitors of today are built with three major refresh rate in mind. The most common is 60 Hz, which can be used at any resolution without requiring high quality computer systems to render, and then 120 Hz and 144 Hz. The 120 Hz standard also supports what is known as 'lightboost' technology in some monitors, where strobing lights behind the monitor reduce ghosting at high FPS rates.

Beyond measurement and bragging rights, such exercises do have practical bearing in some cases. A certain amount of discarded “headroom” frames are beneficial for the elimination of uneven (“choppy” or “jumpy”) output, and to prevent FPS from plummeting during the intense sequences when players need smooth feedback most.

Aside from frame rate, a separate but related factor unique to interactive applications such as gaming is latency. Excessive preprocessing can result in a noticeable delay between player commands and computer feedback, even when a full frame rate is maintained, often referred to as input lag.

Without realistic motion blurring, video games and computer animations do not look as fluid as film. When a fast moving object is present on two consecutive frames, a gap between the images on the two frames contributes to a noticeable separation of the object and its afterimage in the eye. Motion blurring mitigates this effect, since it tends to reduce the image gap when the two frames are strung together. The effect of motion blurring is essentially superimposing multiple images of the fast-moving object on a single frame. Motion blurring makes the motion more fluid for some people, even as the image of the object becomes blurry on each individual frame. Motion blur can also induce headaches when people play a game that requires concentration.[20]

A high frame rate still does not guarantee fluid movements, especially on hardware with more than one GPU. This effect is known as micro stuttering.

The frame rate within games varies considerably depending upon what is currently happening at a given moment, or with the hardware configuration (especially in PC games). When the computation of a frame consumes more time than is allowed between frames, the frame rate decreases.
Last edited by Rhuto; Jun 17 @ 4:26am
Zefram Cochrane Jun 17 @ 5:23am 
Originally posted by Rhuto:
Beyond measurement and bragging rights, such exercises do have practical bearing in some cases. A certain amount of discarded “headroom” frames are beneficial for the elimination of uneven (“choppy” or “jumpy”) output, and to prevent FPS from plummeting during the intense sequences when players need smooth feedback most.

Thats assuming you have the headroom capacity to start with, basically that equates to a large amount of extra processing power, for the sake of a few scenes here and there. So its anybodies guess as to whether game coders will think it's worth it or not. And most console games still only run at an average of 30 fps, half that of a Skyrim on a PC. You do the maths.

aside from frame rate, a separate but related factor unique to interactive applications such as gaming is latency. Excessive preprocessing can result in a noticeable delay between player commands and computer feedback, even when a full frame rate is maintained, often referred to as input lag.

See headroom capacity above, latency has neve been a problem for me.

Without realistic motion blurring, video games and computer animations do not look as fluid as film. When a fast moving object is present on two consecutive frames, a gap between the images on the two frames contributes to a noticeable separation of the object and its afterimage in the eye.

A high frame rate still does not guarantee fluid movements, especially on hardware with more than one GPU.

Uh huh.
Last edited by Zefram Cochrane; Jun 17 @ 5:24am
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Date Posted: Jun 16 @ 6:04am
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