Fall of Light

Fall of Light

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This damn genre
First off, so far I'm loving the game. The combat can fee a bit "hit. run. hit. run. hit. run"y and I can't figure out parrying to save my life (or my daughter's as it were). But I'm still enjoying it. My only real issue is death. I understand punishing someone for dying, it adds a sense of .. well .. not wanting to die. But in other games of this sort of hardcore genre, they allow you to at least get back some of what you lost (i.e. exp) when you make it back to your corpse. It gets a little tiring being forced to fight the same enemies over and over and over each time you die just because you thought (oh, well I have full exp I should head back to a shrine. Meh, there's probably a shrine nearby and I don't wanna rekill all those enemies) Then BAM you die randomly to a one hit or a ledge or a trap and now not only do you have to go back through all those enemies you didn't want to walk past earlier. You have to kill all of them otherwise you will lose exp and be at a disadvantage for literally the entirety of the game. Still gonna play it, but everytime I die I'll just be fighting off rage quiting.
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Showing 1-11 of 11 comments
MasterRPG  [developer] Oct 1 @ 9:45am 
Originally posted by Exreme224:
First off, so far I'm loving the game. The combat can fee a bit "hit. run. hit. run. hit. run"y and I can't figure out parrying to save my life (or my daughter's as it were). But I'm still enjoying it. My only real issue is death. I understand punishing someone for dying, it adds a sense of .. well .. not wanting to die. But in other games of this sort of hardcore genre, they allow you to at least get back some of what you lost (i.e. exp) when you make it back to your corpse. It gets a little tiring being forced to fight the same enemies over and over and over each time you die just because you thought (oh, well I have full exp I should head back to a shrine. Meh, there's probably a shrine nearby and I don't wanna rekill all those enemies) Then BAM you die randomly to a one hit or a ledge or a trap and now not only do you have to go back through all those enemies you didn't want to walk past earlier. You have to kill all of them otherwise you will lose exp and be at a disadvantage for literally the entirety of the game. Still gonna play it, but everytime I die I'll just be fighting off rage quiting.
Hi Extreme, nice to meet you.
Thank you so much for your feedbacks - and belevie me, I understand you.
That was the most difficult choice design releated that we did. We know the limit of the system implemented but let me explain WHY we taked this decision.

We want to keep Aether the focus of the sense of lost.
You die -> she die.
You are not too fast to defend her -> Shadows will kidnap her.

We want keep FoL story-driven. When you die, we don’t want that you think ‘ohhh damn, my xp... now I must come back to take them’; we want you think ‘ohhh nooo and now Aether... is died’.
Maybe we have not centered totally the target - but that’s our goal about the death in the game.
Thanks for responding and thanks for actually giving your reason. Most devs would just say that that's what they decided to go with, without actually giving reasons. The story driven aspect to this game is one of the main reasons I picked it up and if that system helps it in that regard and isn't just there to give the game artificial length I'm fine with it :)
MasterRPG  [developer] Oct 1 @ 11:44am 
Originally posted by Exreme224:
Thanks for responding and thanks for actually giving your reason. Most devs would just say that that's what they decided to go with, without actually giving reasons. The story driven aspect to this game is one of the main reasons I picked it up and if that system helps it in that regard and isn't just there to give the game artificial length I'm fine with it :)
We want to take care of our players. We want to improve the game with your feedbacks and idea, because we do this job for you, not for us.
So, I’ll explain always a design choice and I’ll always take note of your suggestions :)

So, please: continue to give us feedback and idea.

(It’s because of this that I’m quite sad when a player just start with a bad review without try to ask before. But I know: not always are kind people so... it’s part of this job, I suppose).

Anyway, I hoper you’ll enjoy your adventure in the lands of Fall of Light and feel free to write us any time you want.
robart Oct 1 @ 12:20pm 
few things I don't like
- too dark in some areas, why you can't have both lamp and weapon equipped
- falling form edges, I can understand falling from bridges, ramps and so on but the rest just awfull
- annoying archers
- no minimap
- no clue what Aether skills are and how to change them
- why no heal from killing enemies
- filling lamp takes too much time
- are we supposed to kill everyone on a map or just run to shrines, killing seem waste of time since no reward

-For darkness: I rarely use my lamp (maybe up the brightness a bit), also Aether gives some light when you keep her close. (Have'nt needed to refill lamp once because of this.
-The falling was annoying at first, but it's grown on me.
-The archers are annoying, unless they are reloading you aren't landing a hit on them without taking damage.
-I think no minimap is a good idea. You want to stick to as few ui elements as possible in a game like this. Honestly I haven't had much of an issue with not knowing my way around, but this would get worse in late game.
-I agree on the Aether abilities. At the beginning I was told that she buffs me I think, but by how much? What does she buff? What's the radius?
-Heal from killing enemies? That's a terrible idea. You are able to heal using your amulet, that's enough. If you are having that hard of a time. Take a step back and try to find a different approach.
-Killing enemies gives you exp to level up, giving you more health and I think more damage (not positive), so killing enemies is a good thing, but you don't have to kill them all. I'll usually clear an area once at least just for the exp.
MasterRPG  [developer] Oct 1 @ 1:05pm 
About the Aether ability: she buffs the special skill of your weapon.
I.e. if you have a sword, it has a chance to double the damages by critical hit. If you are near Aether, the chance is double.
How you can understand if the buff is on? By the particles on your weapon. If they are ON -> you are buffed.

BUT I agree, this is one of the less clear thing in the game. And we'll try to improve it, I promise.

About the healing: I want to add just one thing to the good sentence from Exreme224 - you can upgrade your Amulet, and you can have up to 10 slot (so, 10 healing "potion"). I think that's enough to clear one are between to Shrine of Power (1 slot -> 5 hp ).
Actually you having to replay everything from a certain point is called a checkpoint system. What makes Souls Souls is the "meta progression" you receive even if you die all the time (because you still keep items, shortcuts stay unlocked etc). Considering this this damn genre is actually far more forgiving than many games that will reset your game state to where you saved or where the checkpoint is.
The moment people start understanding and loving dark souls and similar games is when they learn to get rid of the expectations other games have conditioned you to have. You're not supposed to get through a level in one go or survive the whole game on first playthrough. You're supposed to carefully look everywhere you can and find a smart solution to seemingly unsolvable situations. The unwritten rule of dominant strategy will automatically prevent you from ever doing that if playing it like Fable 3 is not severely punished.
If a game doesn't let you keep anything after death it's essentially disqualified from being a soulslike, then its just an isometric arpg with semirealistic combat and a dark souls paint scheme.
Not dissing the game but this is something i was actually wondering (because it will determine whether i want to buy it or not); how much depth does this game have? Is it just running from checkpoint to checkpoint in a "straight line" or do you actually explore and revisit the world? Its a little hard to tell and i don't want to watch playthroughs or in depth reviews so i don't spoil myself.
Is there actual character building or is it just weapon based?
Last edited by RagingRapscallion; Oct 2 @ 4:03pm
I don't recall being able to keep everything after you die in any of the Souls games (or Bloodborne for that matter). The only real distinction here is you can't RECLAIM them by going back to your place of death. Instead, you reclaim Aether. It's also worth noting that if you didn't make it back to your bloodstain in any of the Souls games, you likewise lose all those souls. Personally, I don't see how this is even a point of contention in the game. Experience comes pretty quickly and you need Aether far more than reclaiming lost souls that you'll get anyway on your way back to Aether.

In my estimation, this might be the first true Soulsborne game after the actual Souls games and Bloodborne. Now if I can just find more altars, I'd be set lol. Although, it is somewhat amusing deciding to investigate after dying (avoiding combat while exploring) and ending up with a swarm of enemies following you around everywhere. Which is what happens when I go off in search of a closer altar to bring Aether to. :)
Originally posted by RagingRapscallion:
Actually you having to replay everything from a certain point is called a checkpoint system. What makes Souls Souls is the "meta progression" you receive even if you die all the time (because you still keep items, shortcuts stay unlocked etc). Considering this this damn genre is actually far more forgiving than many games that will reset your game state to where you saved or where the checkpoint is.
The moment people start understanding and loving dark souls and similar games is when they learn to get rid of the expectations other games have conditioned you to have. You're not supposed to get through a level in one go or survive the whole game on first playthrough. You're supposed to carefully look everywhere you can and find a smart solution to seemingly unsolvable situations. The unwritten rule of dominant strategy will automatically prevent you from ever doing that if playing it like Fable 3 is not severely punished.
If a game doesn't let you keep anything after death it's essentially disqualified from being a soulslike, then its just an isometric arpg with semirealistic combat and a dark souls paint scheme.
Not dissing the game but this is something i was actually wondering (because it will determine whether i want to buy it or not); how much depth does this game have? Is it just running from checkpoint to checkpoint in a "straight line" or do you actually explore and revisit the world? Its a little hard to tell and i don't want to watch playthroughs or in depth reviews so i don't spoil myself.
Is there actual character building or is it just weapon based?

I did not mention Dark Souls even once. Thus my post was not meant as an insult to your beloved game. Please re-read my original post to get an idea for a better, more appropriate response. Thank you.
Originally posted by Exreme224:
Originally posted by RagingRapscallion:
Actually you having to replay everything from a certain point is called a checkpoint system. What makes Souls Souls is the "meta progression" you receive even if you die all the time (because you still keep items, shortcuts stay unlocked etc). Considering this this damn genre is actually far more forgiving than many games that will reset your game state to where you saved or where the checkpoint is.
The moment people start understanding and loving dark souls and similar games is when they learn to get rid of the expectations other games have conditioned you to have. You're not supposed to get through a level in one go or survive the whole game on first playthrough. You're supposed to carefully look everywhere you can and find a smart solution to seemingly unsolvable situations. The unwritten rule of dominant strategy will automatically prevent you from ever doing that if playing it like Fable 3 is not severely punished.
If a game doesn't let you keep anything after death it's essentially disqualified from being a soulslike, then its just an isometric arpg with semirealistic combat and a dark souls paint scheme.
Not dissing the game but this is something i was actually wondering (because it will determine whether i want to buy it or not); how much depth does this game have? Is it just running from checkpoint to checkpoint in a "straight line" or do you actually explore and revisit the world? Its a little hard to tell and i don't want to watch playthroughs or in depth reviews so i don't spoil myself.
Is there actual character building or is it just weapon based?

I did not mention Dark Souls even once. Thus my post was not meant as an insult to your beloved game. Please re-read my original post to get an idea for a better, more appropriate response. Thank you.
So by "this damn genre" you didnt mean soulslike? because everything you described as annoying is exactly what that genre contains. My point wasnt to defend dark souls just to point out the misconception that this genre is harder or less forgiving than all others. People tend to think that because they associate dying with losing, which is not how death works in a soulslike.
Also its quite rude to accuse me of not reading your post while you obviously didnt go past my first sentence.
Last edited by RagingRapscallion; Oct 4 @ 8:46am
Believe it or not. Dark souls is not a genre. It's the fans that gave it it's own genre "soulslike". It's a hardcore RPG, that's what this game is. It is not a "souls" game. If every game announced themselves as a souls game there would probably be some legal issues.
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