Yabba Jan 18, 2013 @ 7:54am
Feelings
have you ever felt any feelings in special? In game of the saga S.T.A.L.K.E.R, what moment made you feel the most feelings like: Frustation, Rage, Sadness or stuff like that
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♠.brT Jan 18, 2013 @ 8:13pm 
I have 50 hours of gameplay, and everytime I have to walk in the open in pripyat or pretty much anywhere (but especially in pripyat) the game always intimidates me, it's not fear is just the notion that if a controller find me in the open I'm dead....
if a chrimea (or whatever the damn thing it's called) find me in the open, I can run but fighting it's pointless, because i'll just died.
if a giant decide to fight me, i have to run...
if a pack of dogs decided to eat me, I have to find some place high.. or they'll just eat me. (or I'll have to use a lot of ammo) (either one works)
Zombies even though they don't have a brain (I assumed) they are very accurate with their crappy guns..
and also rats... they are very annoying.
I don't think bloodsuckers are a much threat anymore.. I faced so many of them it's not even funny anymore. (it's actually a lot of fun fighting them now)

anyway, the only feeling that I have is of intimidation, the game really freaks me the hell out because of how easy the world can killed me.

ALSO emissions.. those things... are really annoying I lost two hours of gameplay one time because, well the game deided that a building with windows wasn't exactly cover from those emissions.. and I just died and had to reload a previous save... fun times.

I'm using the misery mod btw, which makes everything even more intimidating.
Tuskan GA Jan 19, 2013 @ 8:45am 
I've thoroughly explored every area in Call of Pripyat... Except for the city of Pripyat. It is the single most intimidating, as brT put it, place in the entire game for me.

Even more intimidating than the X-8 Lab. Something about the deserted city, the short sight lines, the monsters roaming free all over the place, the Monolith and zombies wandering around, it just freaks me the hell out.

You ask me to weed out all the hidden documents in X-8 and I'll do it. But simply exploring Pripyat is something I just flat out don't want to do.

In most games that attempt to scare you the developers have a few options for ensuring you are actually scared. They can limit the ammo, make areas darker, make enemies super powerful and hyper durable, and add jump scares. Some games even prevent you from defending yourself at all.

Many of these things feel completely arbitrary and often scale to player progression. In a game like Dead Space or Resident Evil, you stop encountering the basic zombies because after a certain point your weapons ensure they provide no real challenge.

STALKER is different. In a lot of ways. Some of the easiest enemies to kill in terms of bullets required are the Hamsters. Scary right? Mutant hamsters sound like adorable cuddle toys or, at worst, Ultra Pee Pee monsters of mass devastation.

But no, the hamsters are just little creatures slightly larger and significantly more spindly than rabbits. You'd think that with the best armor in the game, upgraded fully for durability, that these creatures would pose no threat.

And you'd be dead wrong. They swarm, are hard to hit, and can kill you through sheer numbers.

The weakest enemies in the game can kill you after you've completed everything else and all it takes is a small amount of carelessness.

Enemy damage doesn't scale to the player the further you get in the game; they're just so damn good at killing you from the word "Go."

Ammo isn't scarce, healthpacks aren't scarce, money isn't all that scarce, the game is just designed to kill you.

And it's one of the most rewarding experiences I've ever had. Because while everything is designed to kill you, everything has tactics that can be countered. Once you conquer the Zone, it keeps the weak parts of you and swallows them.

STALKER isn't scary in the traditional sense. Jump scares aren't scripted and thus aren't really jump scares. If you get freaked out it's because you were careless, not because the game tried to freak you out. Between the open world, the free roaming enemies, the long sight lines, and the excellent sound design if you don't notice an enemy sneaking up on you it's you're own damn fault.

Which makes that moment when you truly understand the Zone and know how to navigate its hazards infinitely more satisfying.

Personally I hate survival horror games. I hate horror movies and did in fact lose sleep over Signs. But STALKER isn't really a survival horror game. It has many of the same elements of a survival horror game, but it's so much more.
bernardwatson Jan 24, 2013 @ 4:10am 
Originally posted by Tuskan GA:
Once you conquer the Zone, it keeps the weak parts of you and swallows them.

My experience is that once you think you have conquered the Zone, the Zone waits until you are completely alone in some remote corner before it springs its trap.

You'll be raising your Gauss Rifle for an easy Burer kill when suddenly your hands are empty and you're running for your life as the other Burer and two Controllers that snuck up behind you in complete silence play kick the can with your skull halfway back to camp.

If the Zone is in a good mood, it will let you live. Barely. It might even give you your rifle back, after bouncing it off the back of your head as its troll-like messenger melds back into the darkness with a growling laugh.

If not, the sky fills with fire and the streets with the stuff of nightmares.

Awesome.
Last edited by bernardwatson; Jan 24, 2013 @ 4:10am
The Velocibaptor Jan 25, 2013 @ 4:13pm 

STALKER isn't scary in the traditional sense.

You say that, but I jumped out of my skin the first time you meet the poltergeists in SoC when a skeleton pelvis floats up into the air and lunges at you.
Hakke Jan 25, 2013 @ 5:33pm 
haha yeah depends all on what is perceived as "traditional sense of scaryness". i´d say its a tense and creepy game,unsettling and yeah panic inducingly scary sometimes. and then yeah its not on such nerve-wrecking levels like Amnnesia maybe...but Amnesia is the only really scary game "in the traditional sense" i ever played.for a game with so much non scripted gameplay stalker is pretty creepy.
bernardwatson Jan 26, 2013 @ 1:45am 
Originally posted by Lord Bappington:
You say that, but I jumped out of my skin the first time you meet the poltergeists in SoC when a skeleton pelvis floats up into the air and lunges at you.

Lab X-18 has a certain reputation, but I can't be the only one who whipped out the hunting shotgun and turned up the Dukes of Hazzard chase scene music here. That was crazy fun.

The main experimentation room kind of changed the mood, though...

S.T.A.L.K.E.R. isn't scary horrifying so much as it is scary indifferent. The Zone just doesn't care if you die cold, hungry and alone in the bottom of a pit somwhere no one will find you, even if they notice that you've gone. That is scary.
Last edited by bernardwatson; Jan 26, 2013 @ 1:47am
HEAVY METAL SAMURAI Jan 29, 2013 @ 10:33pm 
Yes I had been fighting Duty for a long while. Usually I don't have a problem but there was one time I had incapacitated a Dutyer and he was on the ground struggling, gasping for air... I could see the horror in his eyes through his gas mask. I just sat there and stared at him. I didn't know what to feel anymore... I had been killing for Freedom for so long and all the deaths finally caught up to me. I looked at his eyes...he was so sad. So full of sorrow. I pulled out my 1911 and ended him. I sat there staring at his body for awhile longer, just thinking about what I've done. What I've been doing this entire time. Out here in the Zone it's tempting to play god but sometimes the ♥♥♥♥ gets to you. It scars you. The phantasms of the people you have slain will never leave your memory, you will forever see them in your dreams. They haunt you, reach out to you and pull your mind into a pit of black. From that day forward, I knew only sorrow. I was a damaged soul, and I never stopped killing. It was an urge I had to nourish, and I lost myself. I owed that to the man I killed that day, and to everyone else I had killed before then. I owed their ghosts my own pain, the pain that came with killing my next combatant. My pain was a tribute to the dead. They wanted me to live to suffer for my past aggressions and they will grant me no rest. This is my dream; this is my nightmare. Killing...and surviving.
Last edited by HEAVY METAL SAMURAI; Jan 29, 2013 @ 10:35pm
Jamtots Jan 30, 2013 @ 12:58am 
The game leaves me with a constant feeling of dread. I am always tense when playing and no matter what I tell myself and no matter how long I've been playing, I just can't relax.

There's always a random chance of running into a Chimera or getting jumped by a group of Bloodsuckers, or stepping into a field of anomalies, getting lost in one of those cave networks ... Whatever it is and wherever you are, there's always a sense of danger.

And the city of Pripyat is a living nightmare. Worse than the X-18 labs. I despise the place, it's terrifying.

Of course, that's why I love the franchise so much. It's especially creepy when you have it modded with MIsery or something (:


Originally posted by bernardwatson:
S.T.A.L.K.E.R. isn't scary horrifying so much as it is scary indifferent. The Zone just doesn't care if you die cold, hungry and alone in the bottom of a pit somwhere no one will find you, even if they notice that you've gone. That is scary.

Yes, exactly this. The sense of foreboding and the cold, detatched nature of the game is what makes it scary.
Last edited by Jamtots; Jan 30, 2013 @ 1:01am
Tuskan GA Jan 30, 2013 @ 1:19am 
Originally posted by bernardwatson:
Originally posted by Tuskan GA:
Once you conquer the Zone, it keeps the weak parts of you and swallows them.

My experience is that once you think you have conquered the Zone, the Zone waits until you are completely alone in some remote corner before it springs its trap.

You'll be raising your Gauss Rifle for an easy Burer kill when suddenly your hands are empty and you're running for your life as the other Burer and two Controllers that snuck up behind you in complete silence play kick the can with your skull halfway back to camp.

If the Zone is in a good mood, it will let you live. Barely. It might even give you your rifle back, after bouncing it off the back of your head as its troll-like messenger melds back into the darkness with a growling laugh.

If not, the sky fills with fire and the streets with the stuff of nightmares.

Awesome.

Even the greatest of conquerers can suffer the occasional defeat. For me, after playing STALKER Call of Pripyat and Shadow of Chernobyl for so long, I stopped jumping. I was attuned to the sound of dog barks in the distance, the moans of zombies on the other side of the hill, the heavy breathing of a bloodsucker. Nothing could surprise me because I was so effective at detecting threats.

I knew the locations of every anomaly, knew how to brave each of the varying types, knew when to run and when to fight, what weapons worked best against which enemies, how to prioritize headshots, how to conserve ammo, what loot to hoarde and what to sell and what to leave where it was.

I could traverse the entire surface of the Zone without Fear because I wasn't an intruder anymore. There was tension sure, any situation with constant danger will have tension. But for me I stopped fearing the various dangers of the Zone as I once did (except in Pripyat... *shiver*).

That's what I mean when I say I conquered it. Because while I may not have chosen the best word to describe it, I'd reached a point where I was no longer desperately trying to survive. I'd reached a point where I was an intrinsic part of the Zone and knew what fights to pick and which to avoid.

That's why it was so satisfying; because I was a denizen of the Zone, not an intruder.

No game has EVER given me that feeling. Mass Effect came close but there was always something in the way.

This is why STALKER is my favorite franchise to date. Because for all it's narative failures, it achieved what no other RPG I've ever played has done before or since; it allowed me to assume a role with virtually no barriers.

For that brief stretch of time when I had thrown myself into this franchise, I was a part of it's living ecosystem.

I've since moved out and every time I go back I realize how out of practice I am.
Last edited by Tuskan GA; Jan 30, 2013 @ 1:22am
Merit66 Feb 5, 2013 @ 3:26am 
It depends on where I was. When I was underground in military bases or in the dark I would be alert, waiting for trouble. When I was amongst the ruins of pripyat I remember feeling a sense of wonder and sadness at the sametime. Wonder because of the vastness of the void that was pripyat and sadness at the fact that the city that used to house so many men, woman and children is now nearly devoid of all life.
After I cleared out the defenses of an apartment building in pripyat, I began to wander it's halls. I remember hearing gun fire going on outside the building as I searched for the codes that I was there for. Then the gunfire stopped and the last man fell. All I could hear then was deafening silence.
It was the atmosphere that truly made stalker such a unique experience. Even Fallout couldn't trigger such feelings from me. I'm just going to wait for the other project vostok is working on. Survarium.
bernardwatson Feb 6, 2013 @ 5:38pm 
Originally posted by Jamtots:
And the city of Pripyat is a living nightmare. Worse than the X-18 labs. I despise the place, it's terrifying.

Once one cleans the Monolith out, it's actually a nice town. Though, I can still hear the monotone chanting of the Preacher whenever I go near the hospital. As for the mercenaries, the trick is to hang back and watch the local wildlife do most of the heavy lifting. From a distance. Preferably up high.

Originally posted by Tuskan GA:
I'd reached a point where I was no longer desperately trying to survive. I'd reached a point where I was an intrinsic part of the Zone and knew what fights to pick and which to avoid.

Yes, this I understand. Inspired by a re-reading for Roadside Picnic (and disappointment with some of Nimble's wares), I've recently been experimenting with light equipment loads, taking more of a scout/recon sort of approach. No direct confrontations, if possible. Not only does one become far more selective in engagements, but I find that one must also learn how to engineer encounters between others.

Just the other day I was in Yanov, about to engage some hostile bandits down in the quarry (technically they were "neutral" but they were headed directly toward a friendly Duty squad up above on the ledge, with weapons drawn). I was taking aim and about to fire when I noticed the pseudogiant in the distance headed toward the group of bandits with similar intent. So I holstered the weapon and fell back behind some cover and enjoyed watching the psuedogiant send some bandits into low orbit.

The Duty squad continued on as if nothing happened. Had I engaged the bandits, this might not have been the case.

Originally posted by Tuskan GA:
No game has EVER given me that feeling.

Indeed, the environment is there to be interacted with. A whole new game opens up once you stop fighting the Zone, and learn to move with it.

Originally posted by jackofaces:
Wonder because of the vastness of the void that was pripyat and sadness at the fact that the city that used to house so many men, woman and children is now nearly devoid of all life.

So then we go and populate it and evacuate it again, all in the shadow of Prometheus himself, no less. That's what got me. I'd seen the statue before the final mission, so, as I was running along fighting off Monolith and zombies along side my comrades, I thought, "you know what would be the perfect place for our last stand?" And wouldn't you know it.

I've heard the storyline described as underdeveloped, and I agreed until that very moment when I realized that it is actually a highly distilled set of metaphors delivered in a single punch. Which fits the style of the franchise perfectly.
Last edited by bernardwatson; Feb 6, 2013 @ 5:41pm
Cygnus Feb 12, 2013 @ 10:03pm 
All I can say its its just not a safe place to be roaming around lol.
Cygnus Feb 15, 2013 @ 9:40pm 
Its my favorite FPS series, just being in the game has this atmosphere that other games cant capture.
Maybe Metro 2033 but its a more linear but great game with its own post apocolyptic atmosphere.
All I know is after the ending of SOC i had to get the other 2 games and i like them all.
Rain, Thunder , Lightening,Day & Night cycles,ambiant sounds, thickest atmosphere around.
batteringRam Feb 21, 2013 @ 12:50pm 
I'll never forget how in SOC the army, the monolith faction and yourself raced for the NPP plant while the sky was turning red, helicopters were crashing right beside you and you could see the gauss rifle fire of monolith snipers everywhere. That just gave me chills.

Also: during the COP outro i cried a little. I'm not even exaggerating.
Whoosaa Feb 26, 2013 @ 12:50pm 
So cool to read the exakt same feelings of other people here that I first experienced in 2007 with SoC, and then continuing (but sligthly less intense) with CS and CoP. The atmosphere of Stalker is in my opinion absolutely unreached - no other game gave me that sort of chills like SoC when you're wandering through the zone (Cordon in the beginning, Wild Territory and Yantar later on) and even though nothing is happening, you're sitting at the edge of your seat, waiting for a monster to come out of nowhere, while listening to screeching sounds.. and nothing happens. Frightening and yet addicting.
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Date Posted: Jan 18, 2013 @ 7:54am
Posts: 19