@nxiety@dder Jan 19 @ 3:09pm
What exactly does Deus Ex stand for?
I looked it up online and got this as an answer:
A deus ex machina [1] Latin: "god out of the machine"; plural: dei ex machina) is a plot device whereby a seemingly inextricable problem is suddenly and abruptly solved with the contrived and unexpected intervention of some new event, character, ability, or object.

However, a friend said that Deus Ex Machina doesn't have to do with Deus Ex: Human Revolution at all. If so, what does it stand for? Thanks!
Last edited by @nxiety@dder; Jan 22 @ 2:01pm
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A Puzzlemint of Legend Jan 19 @ 3:29pm 
Nothing. It's just a cool-sounding name.
JCDenton.male Jan 19 @ 5:20pm 
It's definitely inspired by "Deus ex machina" a crossblending of thougts and theories, dreams and fantasies - evolution of the human kind - integrating, becoming one with the machine - with every human being - shaping our own faith and future - choosing our gods - or becoming gods - the choice is yours.

one of the choices on deus ex 1
http://youtu.be/5WWW90BWNi8

In DX:HR Jensen is the first real step towards integration. before that, the augs were just tolerated by the human body, thus the need for the drugs.
LagMan_pt Jan 19 @ 6:00pm 
Deus ex is a latin expression meaning basically "god from or god from the" , the most knowned citation is "deus ex machina" (god from the machine). This expression has origins in antient greece, in greek theater there was usually a final character dressed like a deity that would come down tied to a rope on a type of crane, he would then wrap up the story or stories of the play in an organized ending solving the plot (greek theater was often rather confusing in terms of how the play was presented) that character was named deus ex machina. (god coming from the machine). It suits the game perfectly dont you think and can have different meaning aplied to the games context :). The wiki has a lot of info on the phrase. If we can be "perfect" like gods fusing our bodys with machines maybe then we´ll be able to solve all our problems as only gods can, machines and technology as saviors and rulers of mankind or just the means for us to become more than humans, gods. hehe its amazing how low we think of ourselfs as a race forever awaiting and strifing for someone or something behond our reach to takes us away from our misery and lead us into the future, we dont even believe in ourselfs or that we can survive without help of gods or machines, the strange is, this feeling of perpetual inadequacy is also what made us come so far :P. i love how this game explores those human dilemmas, it so well put together it really makes you think about humanity and what lies in the future for us as a species
Last edited by LagMan_pt; Jan 19 @ 6:45pm
Improper Use Jan 19 @ 8:41pm 
I thought it was a warning that a ♥♥♥♥ ending was coming.

And boy were they right!
kivimik Jan 19 @ 8:52pm 
As someone who has studied theatre history, the Deus ex Machina was a physical device/crane for staging gods descending from the heavens in Ancient Greek theatre, often associated with the resolution of the play. It is now associated as a name for a plot device that quickly and easily resolves a story when the protagonist is in such a bind that it can't be resolved without external help (god, king, authority figure). It's generally considered to be poor writing if an author relies heavily on it.

In the context of the game series, the protagonists (Adam, J.C., or Alex), as mentioned above, become like gods because the the abilities they gain from merging with technology (physical or nano-augmentations). Also, there are a number of background "entities" that attempt to manipulate the world for their own purposes like puppet masters (the Illuminati, Majestic 12, etc.).
@nxiety@dder Jan 19 @ 8:53pm 
Originally posted by Improper Use:
I thought it was a warning that a ♥♥♥♥ ending was coming.

And boy were they right!
The endings are actually really good
Last edited by @nxiety@dder; Jan 19 @ 8:54pm
Affinity420 Jan 19 @ 11:33pm 
You'd be correct. It is Latin, meaning God from. So, in this title it is God from the Machine. My friend has Deus Ex Corde tattoed on his arm. It means God from the Heart. I love this game.
*O Teri* Jan 21 @ 12:32am 
*actually the one who came up with the name was drunk it was supposed to be "due sex" instead it became "Deus Ex"*


*jk ^^

it is latin "God of Machines"
Thumper Jan 21 @ 10:44am 
all of the above are correct
Deus Ex Panem Jan 21 @ 6:45pm 
I don't know what the precisely correct way to translate it is. I don't know latin. By itself, it may have a slightly different meaning than if it is followed by another word. Usually you will see it used in the phrase "Deus Ex Machina" (as others have said).

Now again I have to say that I do not know latin, but I believe there are a few different ways to translate that into English, each with a slightly different meaning. One could be "God from the machine", another could be "God of the Machine", and another could be "God in the Machine". One of these translations strongly implies that the god being spoken of has arisen or come into being out of the parts of the machine. I think that translation has the most relevance to the game, although the game's ending is also somewhat of a "Deus Ex Machina" in the storytelling sense.

But just "Deus Ex" by itself? I am really not sure what that's about. I THINK you could say that means "God Manifested" or "God comes forth" or "God arises", or similar.

I wish I knew latin.
Trixie Jensen Jan 25 @ 10:19am 
It means "I never asked for this".
RT Jan 25 @ 3:45pm 
Originally posted by @nxiety@dder:
I looked it up online and got this as an answer:
A deus ex machina [1] Latin: "god out of the machine"; plural: dei ex machina) is a plot device whereby a seemingly inextricable problem is suddenly and abruptly solved with the contrived and unexpected intervention of some new event, character, ability, or object.

However, a friend said that Deus Ex Machina doesn't have to do with Deus Ex: Human Revolution at all. If so, what does it stand for? Thanks! :D:
Well, I guess he meant that it had something (a lot) to do with the original Deus Ex, in which theme of "god out of machine" was explored literally and figuratively.
RT Jan 25 @ 3:45pm 
Originally posted by Deus Ex Pane:
I don't know what the precisely correct way to translate it is. I don't know latin. By itself, it may have a slightly different meaning than if it is followed by another word. Usually you will see it used in the phrase "Deus Ex Machina" (as others have said).

Now again I have to say that I do not know latin, but I believe there are a few different ways to translate that into English, each with a slightly different meaning. One could be "God from the machine", another could be "God of the Machine", and another could be "God in the Machine". One of these translations strongly implies that the god being spoken of has arisen or come into being out of the parts of the machine. I think that translation has the most relevance to the game, although the game's ending is also somewhat of a "Deus Ex Machina" in the storytelling sense.

But just "Deus Ex" by itself? I am really not sure what that's about. I THINK you could say that means "God Manifested" or "God comes forth" or "God arises", or similar.

I wish I knew latin. :meatytears:
No, it was referring to Deus Ex Machina. The first game's CD label has a translation of the phrase on the inside.
Brecor Jan 30 @ 4:27pm 
In Lehmann's terms, it means lazy writing in which an impossible event lacking all logic makes everything rosy again and all can go home happy.
Ł☼ςʞ'ϞŁ☼∂ᶑ Feb 1 @ 11:49am 
It translates to:

I'm all 'auged-out', so don't ♥♥♥♥ with me...
Last edited by Ł☼ςʞ'ϞŁ☼∂ᶑ; Feb 1 @ 11:50am
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