vurt Jul 4 @ 7:09pm
Raising skills..
How often are you supposed to be able to raise your skills? I've just started chapter 3 and so far there has always been 0 points to distribute. For example Nalia just became level 12 and there's 0 skill points and 1 weapon proficiency to distribute.

Is my games bugged? I'm using a few mods (EE compatible, supposedly) so maybe something broke it :/

Edit: ah, google helped. So she doesnt advance as Thief any more since she's dual class. But i can't remember being able to distribute skills for ANY character. It's just 1 weapon proficiency every 4th level (or whatever it is?) to distribute.. feels odd that there's so little you can do when you level up, it all seems rather automated with no real input from the player at all basically.
Last edited by vurt; Jul 4 @ 7:18pm
Showing 1-12 of 12 comments
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kamster99 Jul 4 @ 8:42pm 
Well by levelling up she will get access to more mage spell slots and higher level spells. But basically until you get your characters to approximately 3 million xp (whenever they level up after that amount of xp) you won't be getting of choices to make. Especially if you don't have a sorcerer or single/multi-class thief in your party. At approximately 3 million xp (this can vary depending on various circumstances) you start getting higher level abilities to choose from.
Last edited by kamster99; Jul 4 @ 8:57pm
Tigz Jul 4 @ 9:03pm 
Are you talking a charc Attributes? str, dex, con ect?
kaiyl_kariashi Jul 4 @ 10:23pm 
Yeah. It's pretty much it. There's supposed to be Non-combat Proficiencies to deal with, that are similar to the skill ranks from 3rd edition, but they aren't implemented ( few of them were implemented as high level abilities or limited use-class skills, but don't have points to distribute).

Theives and Monks are the only classes that get skills to distribute when leveling.

Sorcerers/Dragon Disciples get to pick new spells occassionally as well.

And at higher level 3,000,000+ total XP, a character starts earning High Level Abilities they can pick from.

But for the most part, weapon proficiencies are all most characters have to deal with.
vurt Jul 5 @ 1:54am 
Ok, thanks :)
Incunabulum Jul 5 @ 11:44pm 
Different classes have different things to level up.

Warrior (Fighter/Ranger/Barbarian) will get a lot of weapon proficiencies (though only Fighters can get a weapon skill up to 5) and even then, won't get one every level.

Only Thieves/Bards/Monks get points to put into find traps/move silently/etc and only Thieves get a lot of them.

Magic users will get new spell levels every 2-3 character levels and more spells per day at each level (and that's about it for them).

2nd edition D&D is very different mechanically from 3rd and 4th.
kaiyl_kariashi Jul 7 @ 1:08am 
Not really. If you mean BG's version of 2nd edition, sure, since it's actually a pretty $%#^ty adaption.

But actual PnP 2nd edition? Not so much. They're actually extremely similar. Even if you only include the core rule books, all the stuff is there, there only a few tiny differences in how a few mechanics are handled.

The big difference with 3rd edition was it's changes to multi-class and basically removing class restrictions, barring a few prestige classes.

3rd edition is also MUCH more based around combat, where as 2nd edition is more roleplaying friendly, since after about 3-5, you can handle anything less then a Epic Level encounter with careful planning and tactics. (not to mention, lower level oriented. With 10-20 being closer to 3rd editions 20-30, and 20+ being closer to 3rd's 30-40).

Pretty much everything else has an equivilent. And as a result, it's actually not that hard to do a conversion.
ShadyMofo86 Jul 7 @ 6:15pm 
I thought that D&D had hit 4th ed.? Guess not. Stopped paying attention after 3.5 and then the re-release of 2nd revised. Then again Wizards of the West Coast (better known as Hasbro) will come out with another edition since all they do is force new editions (AKA: ruin franchises).
kaiyl_kariashi Jul 7 @ 8:32pm 
BG was made back in 1998. The whole reason Throne of Bhaal was rushed and turned into a extremely linear expansion, instead of the full 3rd game it was supposed to be, was due to Bioware's license to make 2nd Edition games was about to run out, and with 3rd Edition having been released by that point, WotC wouldn't let them renew it. Neverwinter Nights was also supposed to be a 2nd edition game with full transition capabilities of characters made in Baldur's Gate. (which older releases of Baldur's Gate 2 still advertise on their loading screens as a feature on occassion).

This is just a tweaked re-release of the old game.
Last edited by kaiyl_kariashi; Jul 7 @ 8:36pm
Incunabulum Jul 7 @ 10:20pm 
Originally posted by kaiyl_kariashi:
Not really. If you mean BG's version of 2nd edition, sure, since it's actually a pretty $%#^ty adaption.

But actual PnP 2nd edition? Not so much. They're actually extremely similar. Even if you only include the core rule books, all the stuff is there, there only a few tiny differences in how a few mechanics are handled.

The big difference with 3rd edition was it's changes to multi-class and basically removing class restrictions, barring a few prestige classes.

Pretty much everything else has an equivilent. And as a result, it's actually not that hard to do a conversion.

Seriously - THAC0 for example. Weapon/cast speed for another. Everything D20. Skills/feats vs non-weapon proficiencies.


Third edition streamlined (and balanced right from the start) a lot of stuff that was bolted onto 2nd over the years. And the change to multi/dual classing is the *least* difference between the systems, especially with class/non-class proficiencies and the limits on the number of skillpoints you can put into a single skill at each level minimizes that difference even more. In 2nd edition your thief could be outstanding as a 2nd story man and not be able to open a safe to save his life, while another could be a magician at safe-cracking - 3rd says 'nah, you're going to be equally mediocre at both'. Granted, that allows a DM to better balance an encounter for a random pick-up group, since he knows roughly where to set the skill checks.

OTOH, how many random PUG's do you see on tabletop?


I didn't say that it was hard to do a conversion - I said that *mechanically* they are very different systems.
Incunabulum Jul 7 @ 10:21pm 
Originally posted by ShadyMofo86:
I thought that D&D had hit 4th ed.? Guess not. Stopped paying attention after 3.5 and then the re-release of 2nd revised. Then again Wizards of the West Coast (better known as Hasbro) will come out with another edition since all they do is force new editions (AKA: ruin franchises).


Hit 4th and 5th edition is coming out - well 'D&D Next' is what they're calling it.
kaiyl_kariashi Jul 8 @ 2:01pm 
Originally posted by Incunabulum:
Originally posted by kaiyl_kariashi:
Not really. If you mean BG's version of 2nd edition, sure, since it's actually a pretty $%#^ty adaption.

But actual PnP 2nd edition? Not so much. They're actually extremely similar. Even if you only include the core rule books, all the stuff is there, there only a few tiny differences in how a few mechanics are handled.

The big difference with 3rd edition was it's changes to multi-class and basically removing class restrictions, barring a few prestige classes.

Pretty much everything else has an equivilent. And as a result, it's actually not that hard to do a conversion.

Seriously - THAC0 for example. Weapon/cast speed for another. Everything D20. Skills/feats vs non-weapon proficiencies.


Third edition streamlined (and balanced right from the start) a lot of stuff that was bolted onto 2nd over the years. And the change to multi/dual classing is the *least* difference between the systems, especially with class/non-class proficiencies and the limits on the number of skillpoints you can put into a single skill at each level minimizes that difference even more. In 2nd edition your thief could be outstanding as a 2nd story man and not be able to open a safe to save his life, while another could be a magician at safe-cracking - 3rd says 'nah, you're going to be equally mediocre at both'. Granted, that allows a DM to better balance an encounter for a random pick-up group, since he knows roughly where to set the skill checks.

OTOH, how many random PUG's do you see on tabletop?


I didn't say that it was hard to do a conversion - I said that *mechanically* they are very different systems.

You don't play much table-top 2nd edition do you?

Not really. Everything is the same, they just altered how things are calculated to make it a little more intuitive, but the end result is identical to the previous system. It's literally all there. Every single bit of it.

If BG is your only exposure to 2nd edition, just know Baldur's Gate is about as accurate to 2nd edition, as the Baldur's Gate Novelization (that doesn't exist....DOESN'T EXIST!?) is to game itself. And that is NOT a joke. (that said, Baldur's Gate's individual initiative system is actually a variant initiative rule for 2nd edition...though it is CONFUSING AS ♥♥♥♥!? to try and use in table-top. That rule was pretty much made for being used in a quasi-real-time CRPG).

Even going just by the Core rule book, everything from 3rd edition is in 2nd edition, just presented slightly differently (2nd edition is STILL a d20 system at it's core. The main difference is lower is better instead of higher is better).

Skills and Feats are all part of the Proficiency/Non-combat proficiency system. There's too many example to list, but yeah..it's the same thing. (just a couple, ** Bow/Xbow = Point Blank Shot, *** Bow/Xbow = Long Range shot. ** two-weapon style = Quasi-Monkey Grip (allows using same size weapons (normally Two-fighting is only supposed to apply if the off-hand is lighter then the main hand, except for dual-daggers), but doesn't allow using 2hd weapons).

Reflexive and Will saves already exist. There's a quasi-weapon finesse, but's it's built into every character, and allows using your dex adjustment in place of your str bonus to hit rolls for a small group of weapons, if it's higher.

Heck, Cast-speed/weapon-speed isn't even a core rule in 2nd edition. It's a optional variant rule (mentioned in the core book) that replaces the default initiative system that works just like in 3rd edition.

Most of the combat actions are the same. The only difference is Full Defense is called Parry in 2nd edition, but works the same.
Incunabulum Jul 9 @ 1:52am 
Originally posted by kaiyl_kariashi:
Not really. Everything is the same, they just altered how things are calculated to make it a little more intuitive, but the end result is identical to the previous system. It's literally all there. Every single bit of it.

Dear, ♥♥♥♥ing, lord. I didn't say the ♥♥♥♥ wasn't there. Its all there, in a more consistent and understandable from. I said that they changed the ♥♥♥♥ing mechanics - that's *how* ♥♥♥♥ is done in the game - from 2nd to 3rd. Yes, everything is still there, the way they do it is very different under the hood.

In any case, I'm done with this, its just derailing this poor guy's thread, which he can't delete anymore (thanks Steam).


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Date Posted: Jul 4 @ 7:09pm
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