Kaze Mar 3 @ 10:59pm
I need to know
Someone gifted me a humble key for this game, I've been on the fence about it for a long time, sometimes being awed at the creator's sacrifice and accomplishment and other times hating it for certain things, but now that I actually have it, I intend to give it a chance, but there's something I really need to know about it before I start so I might better prepare myself mentally.

Can this be enjoyed by people who don't like/are annoyed by American Tail? I know that was the key inspiration but I honestly only like one Don Bluth movie and it's definitely not for the animation. (It's Land Before Time if you're curious and I like it more for its story and soundtrack than its animation.) To be quite honest, anything that looks Disney-ish annoys me. I couldn't say exactly why, but animal characters especially are annoying to me in that style.

Plus there's the fact the creator seems like a die-hard fan of oldschool character design for animation and that's another peeve of mine, I can't stand old animation not only because I hate the art style but because none of it had a story I could connect with on an emotional level. I have been told the latter is a non-issue since a compelling plot is one of the game's positives though I know nothing about it because I didn't want spoilers.

I suppose I'd just like for some people to share their opinions and discuss it, it might help me jump the hurtle if my assumption about the art and its inspiration taking over is true. I'm not saying the art is objectively bad, just that I don't know if I entirely like it. The screenshots are meh to me but I don't know how they animate.

I also realize some people might not understand why I would be hesitant to try a game because of my issues with what inspired the art; I can't give an objective or logical reason other than I don't even like being in the same room with those types of animations, let alone sitting through them in a game or TV show, so it would actually be a pretty big leap for me to play a game that looked like them. Different things are ugly to different people, and old cartoons from the west are just one of the things that's ugly to me specifically on that kind of scale.

And finally, I am definitely not of the belief that graphics are pointless so I would reappy appreciate not hearing any comments about how worrying about how a game looks is pointless because video games wouldn't be video games without the video and obviously someone went to a lot of house-breaking trouble to make the video side of their game stand out in the first place. To me, being immersed in a universe means taking in all its assets and the graphics are one of those.
Showing 1-15 of 58 comments
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Mint Vanilla Mar 8 @ 10:02pm 
To be honest, it sounds like you really don't want to play this game, so I am unsure why you are here asking for advice. Surely you must have some reason for being "on the fence about it for a long time", but the only positive thing you mentioned in your entire post is the creator's sacrifice and accomplishment, and while it truly is inspirational that one guy designed the game, I don't think that by itself should be the sole reason for playing the game, especially when you seem to have so many reservations. If you go in with a negative mindset, then you are already setting yourself up for disappointment before you even try it.

You know yourself best, and if you don't think you can stomach the animation or anthropomorphic animals, then perhaps this is not the game for you. By your own admission, you are annoyed by An American Tail and anything that looks Disney-ish (and quite a few people think of Don Bluth in describing this game), so I don't see how much enjoyment you can get from the game animation-wise. And there's nothing wrong with that; there are certainly people who don't like this game, and while animation is usually not one of the complaints, everybody is different.

Personally, I think the plot is pretty good, though I'm generally accepting of most plots, so I may not be the best critic to listen to, especially as I don't know what kinds of stories connect with you on an emotional level.

Another thing you may want to consider is voice acting. Most notably, many people like Fidget (myself included), but many people also dislike her. She has a very high-pitched voice, possibly something you'd hear in an anime. Some people simply find her annoying. Fidget is your little flying companion who follows you for the entire game, so you'd be hearing her a lot.

Since this is the Dust: An Elysian Tail forum, most people here are fans of the game and will probably tell you to play it. But ultimately, you have to decide for yourself. Perhaps watching a review of the game will help you decide.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNP31Z-wu9U

That is IGN's review of the game (albeit the original Xbox Live version, but it still applies). It's a short, concise review.

TotalBiscuit has a much more in-depth review of the Steam version if you have half an hour to spare. It does show a cutscene as part of the main plot, but it's only about 10-15 minutes into the game, so it's not too much of a spoiler, I think. After that, it goes into a sidequest, albeit a fairly significant sidequest, of which if you don't want to see the end, you can stop the video at 30:00.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=taRJkbnEgK4

If nothing else, those should give you an idea of how the game looks and sounds without giving away too much.

Finally, even if you decide not to play the game, I recommend at least listening to the soundtrack on Youtube, because the music in this game is phenomenal.

And even though you might dislike this game for its animation, I greatly appreciate your civil and thorough post, if a little long-winded (like I'm one to talk, haha).
Kaze Mar 8 @ 10:34pm 
Originally posted by Mint Vanilla:
To be honest, it sounds like you really don't want to play this game, so I am unsure why you are here asking for advice. Surely you must have some reason for being "on the fence about it for a long time", but the only positive thing you mentioned in your entire post is the creator's sacrifice and accomplishment, and while it truly is inspirational that one guy designed the game, I don't think that by itself should be the sole reason for playing the game, especially when you seem to have so many reservations. If you go in with a negative mindset, then you are already setting yourself up for disappointment before you even try it.

You know yourself best, and if you don't think you can stomach the animation or anthropomorphic animals, then perhaps this is not the game for you. By your own admission, you are annoyed by An American Tail and anything that looks Disney-ish (and quite a few people think of Don Bluth in describing this game), so I don't see how much enjoyment you can get from the game animation-wise. And there's nothing wrong with that; there are certainly people who don't like this game, and while animation is usually not one of the complaints, everybody is different.

Personally, I think the plot is pretty good, though I'm generally accepting of most plots, so I may not be the best critic to listen to, especially as I don't know what kinds of stories connect with you on an emotional level.

Another thing you may want to consider is voice acting. Most notably, many people like Fidget (myself included), but many people also dislike her. She has a very high-pitched voice, possibly something you'd hear in an anime. Some people simply find her annoying. Fidget is your little flying companion who follows you for the entire game, so you'd be hearing her a lot.

Since this is the Dust: An Elysian Tail forum, most people here are fans of the game and will probably tell you to play it. But ultimately, you have to decide for yourself. Perhaps watching a review of the game will help you decide.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNP31Z-wu9U

That is IGN's review of the game (albeit the original Xbox Live version, but it still applies). It's a short, concise review.

TotalBiscuit has a much more in-depth review of the Steam version if you have half an hour to spare. It does show a cutscene as part of the main plot, but it's only about 10-15 minutes into the game, so it's not too much of a spoiler, I think. After that, it goes into a sidequest, albeit a fairly significant sidequest, of which if you don't want to see the end, you can stop the video at 30:00.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=taRJkbnEgK4

If nothing else, those should give you an idea of how the game looks and sounds without giving away too much.

Finally, even if you decide not to play the game, I recommend at least listening to the soundtrack on Youtube, because the music in this game is phenomenal.

And even though you might dislike this game for its animation, I greatly appreciate your civil and thorough post, if a little long-winded (like I'm one to talk, haha).

Thanks for the constructive points, but I feel like I miscommunicated something in the OP. I love anthro animals. Absolutely love them. (Huge furry, actually.) One of my favorite stories is the american Sonic comics because they had so much drama and action and a lot of the characters had relatable personalities and I love seeing that in anthro characters; I like it when I can connect with them, because their world is so magical and so far away from this one and yet when I feel a connection with them, I feel like it's so close to ours, and like I can really be there. It's a kind of escapism I guess.

What I don't like are how a lot of American audiences associate anthro characters with shallow, meaningless cartoons from the 20s and 30s that were just meant to be funny. Not only does slapstick offend and disgust me since it's entirely based on being cruel to another character for no reason, but those characters were so unlikable in those old shows that I didn't see any positive to them. So now, I associate any animation that represents those old cartoons with that image, even though Don Bluth's movies are far from that, they still carry that style inspired by cartoons and comics that were horrible in the sense that they were offensive on multiple cultural and social levels and none of the characters were meant to be cared about on any real emotional level.

The contrast to me is anime. Most anime I've seen, even if I didn't enjoy it (A lot of anime across the century is guilty of unfocused plots) had characters who were likable and empathic. I've seen 19 episodes of the original Kimba from the 60s, and Tezuka is fantastic at making protagonists that are more than just rascals that cause trouble, in fact there were several episodes where some antagonistic characters were defended by the heroes and later made peace with them which is far more appealing to my emotions than just throwing someone who doesn't agree with you into a furnace or trying to toss your girlfriend off a plane because she won't kiss you. (Mickey Mouse is seriously a ♥♥♥♥ed up sociopath.)

Someone recommended I might like this game because it reminds them of anime, but there are just little things about the art that continue to irk me like how the characters only have four fingers and that's basically a leftover from when people were still animating traditionally and the only reason people do it now is as an homage to those old cartoons I mentioned make me sick, and the facial expressions of many characters (fidget excluded I guess) reminds me a lot of Merry Melodies' old cartoons (Which are about as racist, sexist, and overall regressive as you can get.) And facial expressions or how faces look in general is just really important to me. And personally I just prefer how people look in anime, they look cuter for one thing, and I've never associated anime with brutality for the sake of humor.

The appeal of the actual game, though, is that there aren't enough metroidvania platformers in the world and there certainly aren't enough people who take anthro seriously enough to make a deep involved story about them. Most western audiences would rather just see them in kid shows hitting each other with oversized hammers or otherwise being idiotic. (indicated by CN's lineup) (Unless it's Sonic, then every canon is horrible and shallow, except the American and British comics and a couple western cartoons that are no longer running.)

So it's a cunnundrum where someone actually made an anthro story in a genre I really like, but they drew inspiration from things I really hate. That's pretty much why I'm on the fence about it.

Plus, if you spent as much time around furries as I do, you'd get pretty tired of that style to. Everyone draws like Tex Avery orearly Disney or Don Bluth and it gets really old really fast, it's like all of them are plugged into the nostalgia computer and all of their inspiration is directly taken from the same source. It's annoying. Why do so many furry artists have to draw like that? Why can't they take inspiration from something else? It's to the point where I only casually browse Pixiv now just because seeing a lot of similar anime styles is still preferable to years of seeing the same western styles from my own culture.

The last paragraph is I guess a mini rant but I think I established my bias pretty clearly. I don't really blame anyone who likes the styles I don't, but surely anyone can understand when I cannot escale something I inherently don't like which has led to me hating it and just wishing everyone, including the creator of this game, didn't draw like that.

Edit: By the way, I don't hate all western cartoons, I'm just annoyed at a western generalization of how anthro characters are designed, like they HAVE to look that way or something. One of my favorite cartoons is Courage the Cowardly Dog, because most of the antagonists you come across are actually not bad people, they're often misguided, broken people who have good hearts but do bad things, and the art style of that show fits with that theme, that it's a world full of insanity and imperfection and it shows in many characters in different ways. Sometimes they're awful people without care for others, but sometimes they can be reached out to and helped. It's one of the most relatable cartoons I know of because its theme seems focused on the diversity of the human soul, and how we can reach out to and help broken people. God I wish there were more cartoons like that in the west, the only modern one is MLP and it's not really as unique. (Although I still like it. I'll take what I can get.)

That's kind of what I'm doing now actually. A few years ago I'd have looked at this game's art and been too proud to even think about playing it, but now I'm kind of running out of options for the kind of stuff I want in games and trying to convince myself to play something despite how I feel about its inspiration is a challenge.
Last edited by Kaze; Mar 8 @ 10:50pm
I believe the use of anthropomorphics in this game was a design choice; story-wise, they never call attention to the fact that the characters are "furry" -- they could have easily been designated as humans and the plot would continue regardless. This title doesn't play on any of the "funny animal" steretypes of traditional Western animation.

As for categorizing Dust, the art style falls somewhere between traditional Disney-esque and Eastern kemono, which appears to be Japanese for "beast" -- very anime-like, but not not necessarily chibi or cute (if you've browsed Pixiv or played another furry PC-game like Morenatsu, then you've seen this style).

I can't say I'm proud of the way anthropomorphic characters are portrayed in external media (outside of the fandom), but all the negative tropes have definetly been avoided with this title. Even if you don't care for the animation style, the gameplay is fantastic as is the soundtrack.
Roi du Feta Mar 9 @ 12:54pm 
I'm not going to make a big paragraph and confuse you even more.
Play this game if you like to get yourself into a good story with great artstyle and a good fighting mechanism. If you do not like the artstyle, I still say you should play it. The story is great, the characters are amazing , and it gets emotional sometimes! I haven't felt emotional for a game since Pokemon Mystery Dungeon which was a long time ago, so please just play this game. The soundtrack will enhance the story even more, I think this may possibly be the best game I have played yet!
Kaze Mar 9 @ 8:25pm 
Originally posted by Dana Plato from Diff'Strokes:
I believe the use of anthropomorphics in this game was a design choice; story-wise, they never call attention to the fact that the characters are "furry" -- they could have easily been designated as humans and the plot would continue regardless. This title doesn't play on any of the "funny animal" steretypes of traditional Western animation.

As for categorizing Dust, the art style falls somewhere between traditional Disney-esque and Eastern kemono, which appears to be Japanese for "beast" -- very anime-like, but not not necessarily chibi or cute (if you've browsed Pixiv or played another furry PC-game like Morenatsu, then you've seen this style).

I can't say I'm proud of the way anthropomorphic characters are portrayed in external media (outside of the fandom), but all the negative tropes have definetly been avoided with this title. Even if you don't care for the animation style, the gameplay is fantastic as is the soundtrack.

Well, calling attention to being an animal doesn't bother me, I actually like it. But it's good to know that there is some anime influence in there, might make it easier to get into.

Originally posted by Pinkie Pie Cyborg:
I'm not going to make a big paragraph and confuse you even more.
Play this game if you like to get yourself into a good story with great artstyle and a good fighting mechanism. If you do not like the artstyle, I still say you should play it. The story is great, the characters are amazing :fhappy:, and it gets emotional sometimes! I haven't felt emotional for a game since Pokemon Mystery Dungeon which was a long time ago, so please just play this game. The soundtrack will enhance the story even more, I think this may possibly be the best game I have played yet!

I do collect game soundtracks so I might give it a listen, although I would like to know about the fighting; combat is one of my least favorite things to do in games, but sometimes it's forgivable like in Okami or Zelda or any game where enemies die in a single hit, but I've heard the game has a lot of combat focus although a friend of mine says that you eventually become godlike and nothing can really defeat you which he dislikes but I see as a perk. I would like to ask how intensive it is, if the bosses are insanely hard (as is standard for metroidvania games unfortunately) and if the game has an easy difficulty. (I know it has a normal and hard.) I'm asking because I keep hearing how the game was inspired by Ninja Gaiden, and for someone who really doesn't like combat, or dying for that matter, that's a bit concerning.

The things I do like about metroidvania games are the focus on exploring and collecting items. Collecting stuff is my favorite traditional video game element, and everyone keeps telling me this game does have that stuff and that excites me. Especially the part about sidequests. I figured I'd mention these positives as a counterbalance for my other concern.

Either way I appreciate the both of you taking the time to respond, even though it isn't the most logical reasoning, it has helped me further ease into the game's art, and I think I can give it a go at a later point. (I have a gigantic backlog.) Also, it's nice to know I'm not the only one who feels a certain way about some art choices. I don't think I've ever met someone aware of fandom stuff that felt the same way or similar.
Mint Vanilla Mar 9 @ 9:50pm 
It seems like you have a highly idealized image of animation and anthropomorphism. I liked Courage the Cowardly Dog, though not for the deep, profound reasons that you stated. I think I read a single issue of Archie Sonic when I was a kid (not because I don't like Sonic, but I never got into comic books), so I can't really make any comparisons there. I've watched a few anime when I was younger, but I haven't seen any recently. The only cartoon I watch nowadays is MLP:FiM. I would say that Dust: An Elysian Tail takes itself a little more seriously than MLP:FiM, even considering the more serious episodes like The Return of Harmony, and Dust:AET has more of an "epic" feel to it.

I can safely say that the game's story and characterization is not like Looney Tunes. There is no slapstick in the game that I can recall. As for being cruel for no reason, there have been discussions here about the motivations of a certain character in the game, but to mention any more would be major spoilers, though the character still was not presented in any slapsticky sort of manner. There is one point in the game where you could choose to pull a prank on an NPC for revenge, but it is completely the player's choice. I don't know what kinds of characters you relate to, and likeability of characters is a subjective matter.

Originally posted by Kaze:
I do collect game soundtracks so I might give it a listen, although I would like to know about the fighting; combat is one of my least favorite things to do in games, but sometimes it's forgivable like in Okami or Zelda or any game where enemies die in a single hit, but I've heard the game has a lot of combat focus although a friend of mine says that you eventually become godlike and nothing can really defeat you which he dislikes but I see as a perk. I would like to ask how intensive it is, if the bosses are insanely hard (as is standard for metroidvania games unfortunately) and if the game has an easy difficulty. (I know it has a normal and hard.) I'm asking because I keep hearing how the game was inspired by Ninja Gaiden, and for someone who really doesn't like combat, or dying for that matter, that's a bit concerning.
There are four difficulty levels: Casual, Normal, Tough, and Hardcore. If you don't enjoy combat, then Casual or Normal are for you. I would say that Normal is basically easy mode; it is quite unlikely for you to die. Tough is probably what I would typically consider standard difficulty (it takes some effort to win, and possibly some deaths if it's your first time playing), and Hardcore is basically unfair mode, haha.

However, if combat is really not your thing, then you should know about Casual mode. Casual is not only the easiest in terms of enemy stats, but it is literally impossible to die—you have infinite revive, so you simply resurrect on the spot every time your health goes to zero. (There is an in-game consumable that allows you to do the same thing, but they are expensive; Casual mode does it for free.) Casual also removes limitations on your energy bar and on your Dust Storm, so you can spam them as much as you want. Casual automatically uses autofire for sword attacks and projectiles; the game pretty much plays for you as far as combat goes. (Note that you can also turn on autofire on Normal or any difficulty level.)

Yes, it is possible to eventually become so powerful that you can easily kill everything even on Hardcore, but that's near the end of the game when you have access to the most powerful equipment. Until then, you are going to have to work for it.

You will not have to worry about bosses. One of the more common complaints of the game is that the bosses are too easy. And if you're playing on Casual or Normal, unless you're intentionally trying to kill yourself, they will not pose a threat to you.

Finally, please note that you can change the difficulty level of your current game at any time by accessing the Pause menu.

All that said, combat is undeniably a major part of the game, and while you can simply run past some enemies, you will eventually have to fight whether you want to or not, but Dean really has gone out of his way to be as accommodating as possible.

Originally posted by Pinkie Pie Cyborg:
I haven't felt emotional for a game since Pokemon Mystery Dungeon
Explorers of Sky is one of my favorite games on the Nintendo DS. I played through the main story more than once, and I always cried a little even though I knew what was going to happen.
gryffondor95 Mar 10 @ 12:14pm 
Originally posted by Mint Vanilla:
Explorers of Sky is one of my favorite games on the Nintendo DS. I played through the main story more than once, and I always cried a little even though I knew what was going to happen.

Ah, this game... I finished it a bunch of time (at last half a dozen time) and it's one of the few games that made my eyes wet the first time I saw the end. Blue rescue team too, obviously.
Kaze Mar 10 @ 6:50pm 
I wonder why nobody has mentioned casual mode to me before, probably some people thought I might use it. :V Or maybe I should have explicitly asked them, anyway it's great to know there's a way around it, but I thought the game would be equal parts exploring and item collecting and combat, so I'm hoping that there is still plenty of the former.

The game's creator seems like a really considerate person so I feel someone guilty about some disagreements with his taste. Plus, anyone who can learn to animate and program at the same time must be a genius, especially since in my experience artists and programmers do not mix ery well.

Originally posted by gryffondor95:
Originally posted by Mint Vanilla:
Explorers of Sky is one of my favorite games on the Nintendo DS. I played through the main story more than once, and I always cried a little even though I knew what was going to happen.

Ah, this game... I finished it a bunch of time (at last half a dozen time) and it's one of the few games that made my eyes wet the first time I saw the end. Blue rescue team too, obviously.

I tried to play the MD games but I couldn't get used to the combat and the inability to play as the pokemon I wanted without getting a walkthrough. I got Blue Rescue Team when it was new and it took me 16 tries to get eevee, plus pokemon I really like weren't in some of the other games (like eevee :V) and you've never gotten the option to play as vulpix or swablu or some other pokemon I really like but I'm glad the 3DS MD game at least gives you an option between 4 pokemon. To be honest though, I keep dying on bosses and the like so I think I'll just watch a walkthrough for Time and Darkness.

Incidentally, I think Journey on the PS3 and To The Moon on Steam evoked the most emotion from me. I highly recommend the latter for its amazing story if you're into that.
Last edited by Kaze; Mar 10 @ 6:52pm
Mint Vanilla Mar 10 @ 10:18pm 
Originally posted by Kaze:
I tried to play the MD games but I couldn't get used to the combat and the inability to play as the pokemon I wanted without getting a walkthrough. I got Blue Rescue Team when it was new and it took me 16 tries to get eevee, plus pokemon I really like weren't in some of the other games (like eevee :V) and you've never gotten the option to play as vulpix or swablu or some other pokemon I really like but I'm glad the 3DS MD game at least gives you an option between 4 pokemon. To be honest though, I keep dying on bosses and the like so I think I'll just watch a walkthrough for Time and Darkness.
Pokémon Mystery Dungeon is a specific type of dungeon crawler called a roguelike, and roguelikes in general are notorious for being very difficult games. The Pokémon Mystery Dungeon series is actually significantly easier than typical roguelikes.

As for starter Pokémon, Eevee was removed from Explorers of Time/Darkness but is included in the upgraded remake Explorers of Sky, along with Vulpix. In fact, Vulpix is one of the better starters, with moves like Imprison (which forces an enemy to stand still and do nothing, making lone bosses rather trivial), Faint Attack (an egg move that starter Vulpix automatically starts with, it has 25 PP and always hits, which is quite good for a starting move), and if you get lucky with TMs, Dark Pulse (which hits all enemies adjacent to the user, making it very useful in monster houses and boss fights with multiple enemies). Explorers of Sky still has the personality quiz, though.

I've been considering trying To The Moon. Have you played Dear Esther, Gone Home, or The Stanley Parable?
Last edited by Mint Vanilla; Mar 10 @ 10:23pm
Kaze Mar 10 @ 10:33pm 
Originally posted by Mint Vanilla:
Originally posted by Kaze:
I tried to play the MD games but I couldn't get used to the combat and the inability to play as the pokemon I wanted without getting a walkthrough. I got Blue Rescue Team when it was new and it took me 16 tries to get eevee, plus pokemon I really like weren't in some of the other games (like eevee :V) and you've never gotten the option to play as vulpix or swablu or some other pokemon I really like but I'm glad the 3DS MD game at least gives you an option between 4 pokemon. To be honest though, I keep dying on bosses and the like so I think I'll just watch a walkthrough for Time and Darkness.
Pokémon Mystery Dungeon is a specific type of dungeon crawler called a roguelike, and roguelikes in general are notorious for being very difficult games. The Pokémon Mystery Dungeon series is actually significantly easier than typical roguelikes.

As for starter Pokémon, Eevee was removed from Explorers of Time/Darkness but is included in the upgraded remake Explorers of Sky, along with Vulpix. In fact, Vulpix is one of the better starters, with moves like Imprison (which forces an enemy to stand still and do nothing, making lone bosses rather trivial), Faint Attack (an egg move that starter Vulpix automatically starts with, it has 25 PP and always hits, which is quite good for a starting move), and if you get lucky with TMs, Dark Pulse (which hits all enemies adjacent to the user, making it very useful in monster houses and boss fights with multiple enemies). Explorers of Sky still has the personality quiz, though.

I've been considering trying To The Moon. Have you played Dear Esther, Gone Home, or The Stanley Parable?

Gone Home is on my wishlist, Dear Esther wasn't interesting to me because it felt like it could have been more interactive with its story telling, letting you pick things up and the like, and I've only seen the last game once but thought of trying it.

I know what roguelikes are, I sometimes think they could be really fun games if someone would tone down the difficulty. I like randomly-generated worlds like Minecraft has but not the permadeath crap that they all have or the forced turn-based some of them have like in MD. I rented Explorers of Sky but didn't finish it. (Plus Wigglypuff is an unbelevably annoying tool, I feel sorry for bidoof.) I got stuck on a boss fight and didn't feel like grinding (I never do, don't have the patience) so I sent it back.
Mint Vanilla Mar 11 @ 1:36am 
I see. That's too bad. Explorers of Sky is easier than it seems, as some of the mechanics can be exploited to your benefit; for example, throwing certain seeds at bosses will essentially shut them down for a few turns, and there are quite a few different types of debilitating seeds.

Anyway, I hope you found the answers you're looking for in regards to Dust: An Elysian Tail. I wish you well.
Kaze Mar 11 @ 2:12am 
Originally posted by Mint Vanilla:
I see. That's too bad. Explorers of Sky is easier than it seems, as some of the mechanics can be exploited to your benefit; for example, throwing certain seeds at bosses will essentially shut them down for a few turns, and there are quite a few different types of debilitating seeds.

Anyway, I hope you found the answers you're looking for in regards to Dust: An Elysian Tail. I wish you well.

I did, and the conversation was enjoyed as well. ;3 I would have probably gotten to it eventually anyway but now it's significantly higher on my priorities list for games. (Now I just need to find time to play long games.)
Roi du Feta Mar 12 @ 12:13pm 
Have you played Dust yet?
Kaze Mar 12 @ 4:46pm 
Originally posted by Pinkie Pie Cyborg:
Have you played Dust yet?

It's on my backlog, which is rather large: http://www.backloggery.com/Kazekai

I don't plan on starting any new games until I finish the ones on the Now Playing list, I also plan on finishing the Professor Layton games I haven't beaten yet so I can be ready for the new one that released last month, and the Phoenix Wright games that I haven't beaten for a similar reason. So that adds up to 6 more games in the pipeline plus I promised my friend I'd play at least 2 hours of The Last Of Us (Which I really don't want to play but it's one of his favorite games now, guns and extreme violence scare me a lot) and in exchange he'll watch the first season of Avatar TLA with me, and then after that I will probably decide whether to play a game I've never played before or a game that I have played but lost the data on my computer or haven't played in years, but to be honest there are three games I have lined up for that decision now: Dust is one of them. The other two are Fortune Summoners (Because I can't stop dreaming about it) and Magic Pengel because I haven't played it in nearly a decade and I want to stream it for some friends.

so tl;dr no, not yet, but it's on my top priority list. Truth be told I might skip all that planning and play it anyway, along with the other two games at the same time, because I have no discipline whatsoever. It's kind of fun to make goals like that even though I rarely follow through with them.
Mint Vanilla Mar 12 @ 9:41pm 
Whenever you get around to playing Dust, I'd like to know what you think of it. Would you mind posting your thoughts here, or leaving a comment on my profile or something?

I am playing through the Professor Layton and Phoenix Wright games, myself. I recently finished The Unwound Future and Trials and Tribulations. Next up are The Last Specter and Ace Attorney Investigations... whenever I get to them. I also have to remember to watch the Professor Layton movie.

Originally posted by Kaze:
guns and extreme violence scare me a lot
I hope you don't mind my asking, but is that why you don't like combat in video games?
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Date Posted: Mar 3 @ 10:59pm
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