You Need A Budget 4 (YNAB)

You Need A Budget 4 (YNAB)

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siztem Jan 9, 2013 @ 4:41pm
I find it ironic that
A program called "you need a budget" costs $60
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Showing 1-15 of 73 comments
Ultimate Fatass Jan 9, 2013 @ 6:44pm 
rofl this is too funny, if you need a budget why in the name of a$$ is there a 60 dollar program to tell you how to spend your money?

the worst part: this was greenlighted.
RodeoClown Jan 9, 2013 @ 7:27pm 
We already had this discussion over here: http://steamcommunity.com/app/227320/discussions/0/828925849089033331/

And over here: http://steamcommunity.com/app/227320/discussions/0/828927580794576441/

And here: http://steamcommunity.com/app/227320/discussions/0/828925849116872789/
;)

Our average turnaround in the first month of using our method is $200, so $60 doesn't looks so bad in that light. It also helps pay for us to continue development on it, and provides all the classes, videos, articles, tutorials that are available.

You don't need to buy the software though, it just makes it easier to follow the method, which is the important part. You can check that out here for free: http://www.youneedabudget.com/method
siztem Jan 10, 2013 @ 11:34am 
props to the dev's for keeping tabs on the forums ^
CJM Jan 10, 2013 @ 4:54pm 
Another thing to consider, this budgeting software is supposed to be used for several years. It is a ONE TIME purchase, not a subscription. This is not a game that you only get so many ours out of. This is not a consumable that is used up within a short period of time.

Typically, iPhone apps improve over time, with free upgrades to the latest versions.

That is ~$1.25 per month, or ~$0.30 a week, if you use this program for four years.

Surely you can budget that, to afford this software?

Last edited by CJM; Jan 10, 2013 @ 4:56pm
Picks 'n' Kicks (Terrum) Jan 11, 2013 @ 7:31am 
$60 isn't even that much for a development program. Microsoft, Adobe and many other high-end software sellers go for around $1000 tops.
CJM Jan 11, 2013 @ 6:55pm 
Well, the expected cost of such software, for home use, is betwen $10 to $150. $1k is for software expected to be used commercially. $30-$60 is the best selling price for a quality product in this category.
Last edited by CJM; Jan 11, 2013 @ 7:45pm
Coffee Jan 12, 2013 @ 3:13pm 
Originally posted by RodeoClown:
We already had this discussion over here: http://steamcommunity.com/app/227320/discussions/0/828925849089033331/

And over here: http://steamcommunity.com/app/227320/discussions/0/828927580794576441/

And here: http://steamcommunity.com/app/227320/discussions/0/828925849116872789/
;)

Our average turnaround in the first month of using our method is $200, so $60 doesn't looks so bad in that light. It also helps pay for us to continue development on it, and provides all the classes, videos, articles, tutorials that are available.

You don't need to buy the software though, it just makes it easier to follow the method, which is the important part. You can check that out here for free: http://www.youneedabudget.com/method

How can a $60 software find you $200..... If you just used paper or a spreadsheet and actually monitor your spending you don't need this. For all other people that cannot actually use paper or a spreadsheet.... well good luck, because you are going to have a hard time following any budget then.

Quicken (traditional software for home budget) is sold for $49.99, so an extra $10 for a software that might be more graphically acceptable..... does not make sense if your goal is to save money because you need a budget.

So my question: How does this software compare to Quicken? Can you import your bank account deposits/withdrawl, credit card statements, or keep track of every day expenses? What do you get for the extra $10????

What about GnuCash? That is free on Linux. How about Grisbi, Lazy8Ledger, LedgerSMB, FrontAccounting, SQL-Ledger, TurboCash, osFinancials, or PhreeBooks?

Can you tell us why your software is better then these FREE ones?

I don't mean to offend, but my question drills down to; how is your software better then the competition? Why should I spend $60 when I can spend less else where.

Thanks
Last edited by Coffee; Jan 12, 2013 @ 3:16pm
social_distortion Jan 12, 2013 @ 4:50pm 
This game is great. Almost feels like real life.
CJM Jan 12, 2013 @ 4:54pm 
Originally posted by Coffee:
Quicken (traditional software for home budget) is sold for $49.99, so an extra $10 for a software that might be more graphically acceptable.....

Can you tell us why your software is better...
It is more user friendly, meaning easier to use for the average person. Those who do not even know what Gnu Cash is, and would likely never use it.

YNAB competes favorably with Quicken, but is intended for those who hate Quicken's UI, and are willing to spend an extra $10 to get rid of Quicken's UI, and get something easier to use.

http://www.moneycrashers.com/you-need-a-budget-review-ynab/
http://personal-finance-software-review.toptenreviews.com/

I would likely recommend YNAB over Ace Money or Quicken, to everyone else but you. I'd recommend Ace Money to you, as YNAB is clearly not for you, Mr. Coffee.
Last edited by CJM; Jan 12, 2013 @ 4:56pm
RodeoClown Jan 12, 2013 @ 5:18pm 
Here's a comparison page for YNAB and Quicken: http://www.youneedabudget.com/ynab-vs-quicken

Quicken is good for looking back. YNAB is made for looking forward. They have a different focus (although there is an obvious crossover).
Coffee Jan 12, 2013 @ 5:32pm 
Originally posted by CJM:
Originally posted by Coffee:
I would likely recommend YNAB over Ace Money or Quicken, to everyone else but you. I'd recommend Ace Money to you, as YNAB is clearly not for you, Mr. Coffee.

I have never used Quicken since I don't believe in it, but my father and brother uses it... I personally do not need a budget software, but I can see how this would help a LOT of people. It's the price that makes me scratch my head. Most of the functions are not something new. It's been done, just not in the nice interface they offer. If it was sold for $10, then I would recommend it to everyone. At $20-30 I would recommend it to most people. But for what it does, $60 is over priced. All it does i make a budget and encourage you to put some money on the side for savings/rainy day. Guess what, if the money is in the bank, you will see it and might still spend it! That is the biggest issue with people and budget. You would need to have a second account which deposits the monthy amounts (or a cash jar which might go missing in the next break-in) to make the payment when they come due.

I feel that for $60 it should be able to do more. An excel spreadsheet or openoffice Calc spreadsheet will do the job just as well. Do you really need a graph??? (which the spreadsheet can do)

And unless I am wrong, you still need to pay to by the app for apple or android. That is another $5..... really..... so $65 for a budget tool. Atleast the app aspect would help most people manage better since most people these days carry an ipod or android device. So that is a plus. But the cost is just too high.

And what about taxes? If you are not good with budget, you might have issues making sure your income tax are also up-to-date and you are not short at the end of the year.

As for Ace Money. Not for me. I do not need a financial software. And let's not kid ourselves, all YNAB does is budgets (does it very well but still).

I am still waiting for WHY and HOW this software is better then the others. Been more friendly might help, but most people that need frendly softwares are usually pants on computers anyway which means they usually are not buying softwares... Is it the offer of the app at $5 (is this the first of it's kind to link both)???? I also do not like the cloud sync since I do NOT want my financial data floating out there, nor do I want to be targeted for ads since the free Cloud Sync owns my info as payment for the service (they sell it to advertisers). Beside my cloud issue has nothing to do with this deveopper.

And seriously, step 3.... really... if you don't follow your budget, it's ok, just cut some spending elsewhere.... what was the point of a budget then. If I save on something in my budget, it goes to savings or mortgage, not "oh I have more money to spend!". That might make sense for the first couple of months, but if you constantly need to move cash from some where else, like say that insurance payment in 3 months, then your budget is not working.

I do agree with step 4 and would strongly urge people to adopt it.
Coffee Jan 12, 2013 @ 5:41pm 
Originally posted by RodeoClown:
Here's a comparison page for YNAB and Quicken: http://www.youneedabudget.com/ynab-vs-quicken

Quicken is good for looking back. YNAB is made for looking forward. They have a different focus (although there is an obvious crossover).

Ok, so it's a one time purchase - good. (no removal of features.... what other features do you have other then budgeting.... kinda a marketing gimmic on that one).
Not linked to your bank - Quicken allows you, but you DON'T have too.... again marketing.

YNAB Method - ignore your retirement, worry about right now, retirement will be taken care of later.... while I do some what agree depending on age, this is not really planning for the future. This is, stick you head in the sand and worry about 1-3 months in the future, not 10+ years in the future.
Forum community is onyl useful if you have issues or questions, and it's already open to everyone already (I do like the topics on your Forum).... so I guess buying the software would atleast support you and make sure it stays alive.
I rarely worry about customer support when I buy a software. IF I have to worry about it, then I don't buy it, period.

Really, just a over price budgeting tool which can be obtained for less elsewhere, but atleast you can carry it on your apple or android IF you buy the app as well.

I still fail to see why this is sold for $60. I guess I just don't see it.
RodeoClown Jan 12, 2013 @ 5:53pm 
Hi Coffee,
I think you've missed a bit here.

We definitely don't say to ignore your retirement - we think that's something you should be saving for pretty aggressively (fits right in rule 2 - "Save for a rainy day"). As for cloud sync, we don't have access to that data at all, so there's no way we could sell it to advertisers even if we wanted to (which we don't - we hate spam as much as you do).

If you want to get a much better understanding of how the method works, I'd highly recommend checking out one of our free classes: http://www.youneedabudget.com/support/training-and-education

The software is built to make the method easier to use, but you don't need the software to do it at all. You are more than able to follow the method without using the software - we have users on our forums who do it with pencil and paper, or using Excel. There's even some people who use Quicken to follow the method (it's painful to make it fit there though).

The reason we think the software is better (and I bought the software and loved it before I worked here), is because it forces you to focus on NOW. What money do you have RIGHT NOW, and what does it need to do. You make a plan, and then follow it. If you don't follow it, of course it's not going to help you, but if you do follow it, you end up with a lot of peace of mind that when bills come in, you can just pay them, that you are saving for your retirement, that if something unexpected comes up, it's not the end of the world. The software just makes it easier to do that, it's not essential, and if you don't want to buy it, we aren't going to force you to :)

(Oh, and there's a free iPhone app version, and we're looking at a free Android app too - it's not there yet though as the Android development started a year after the iPhone).


CJM Jan 12, 2013 @ 6:10pm 
Originally posted by RodeoClown:
Originally posted by Coffee:
YNAB Method - ignore your retirement, worry about right now, retirement will be taken care of later.... while I do some what agree depending on age, this is not really planning for the future. This is, stick you head in the sand and worry about 1-3 months in the future, not 10+ years in the future.
Hi Coffee,
I think you've missed a bit here.

We definitely don't say to ignore your retirement - we think that's something you should be saving for pretty aggressively (fits right in rule 2 - "Save for a rainy day").

This last point has my attention. For $60, I don't see a lot of focus on a very imporant, and often overlooked part of budgeting.

The Short-term now has to be managed before the future, and managing future expenses can get complicated. However, I have a couple of rules, "You are never going to make more money than you are now, so plan your retirement accordingly.", also "Make more money than you are making now!". Better than trying to budget based on future income/expenses, stock market gains/drops, Interest rates, inflation, yada yada.

Actually, inflation is the biggest concern I have for retirement, money looses its value over time, so putting long term savings in a "savings account" is practically throwing money away.

This is what I have come up with so far. Neither quote indicates a strong focus on retirement saving.

http://www.youneedabudget.com/support/article/rule-two-save-for-a-rainy-day
This is where prioritizing is critical. We always recommend the following approach to prioritizing as your Budget:
1. Budget toward immediate needs (food, gas, shelter).
2. Budget for bills that are due soon.
3. Budget for bills due later in the month.
4. Budget toward rainy day Categories.
5. Build a Buffer!

http://www.youneedabudget.com/method/rule-two
Common Questions About Rule Two
How do I determine what larger, less-frequent expenses to save for?
Go back through your checking account. They’ll jump right out at you.

What features of this program focus on retirement, and how will YNAB help me prepare for retirement, after I get my budget under control in the present?
Last edited by CJM; Jan 12, 2013 @ 6:11pm
RodeoClown Jan 12, 2013 @ 6:37pm 
Here's a podcast on retirement: http://traffic.libsyn.com/youneedabudget/050_-_A_Startling_Statistic_Strikes_Fear_in_My_Heart._You.mp3

Basically, we treat retirement savings just like anything else you need to budget for - you need to put money aside for your future, but how much you need to have set aside is outside the scope of YNAB.
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