Brandtner Mar 22, 2013 @ 12:10pm
Would you use that thing? ... Seriously!?
Sorry, if this comes accross a bit troll-ish or something, but I just watched the first trailer and had to keep my eyes from getting all creased up while frowning really hard.

I've never heard of anyone (!) I've known ever (!) having a problem with knowing where his or her money goes. I mean come on ... is this fake? Like 'first of April 0.5' ... o_Ó

This might be a cultural difference (or maybe not), but seriously:
Would you use a program like this to keep track of your spendings?
Or do you think others might find it useful?
[even typing this makes me frown in disbelieve again ...]

P.S.:
Just trying to learn here. I'm serious.
Showing 1-15 of 57 comments
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wm. Mar 22, 2013 @ 12:13pm 
Ha. How old are you, and are you single?

Oh, you're German. Well, the rest of us lack the genes for instinctive and telepathic fiscal discipline and need a little help. :-)
RodeoClown  [developer] Mar 22, 2013 @ 12:15pm 
It's a fair question.
There are LOTS of people who have no idea where there money is going.
Seriously! Way more than you'd imagine.

But we actually do a lot more than tracking your spending (although that's part of it).
Check out the method[www.youneedabudget.com] for a good overview of how it all works.

I think the software is pretty great -- obviously I'm biased, being one of the developers -- but I actually bought and used it well before I worked here, and loved it so much that when an opportunity to be part of the team came up, I jumped at it.
Brandtner Mar 22, 2013 @ 12:18pm 
*sigh*
Just trying to learn.
I'm highly in doubt that this has anything to do with genes, though.

I'm 4 by the way. 5 next Wednesday (hoping for my first own Sparbuch) :)
Schalom
wm. Mar 22, 2013 @ 12:21pm 
The real answer is that household expenses get complicated in a family, especially with multiple debts and unexpected expenses, and that humans really use a range of metaphors to think about their finances. Some work better than others, and the right metaphors (and user interfaces to make those metaphors match real-world numbers) can make people plan better and change their behavior for the better. Think of it as a tool for hacking your own spending/saving thinking and behavior..
Brandtner Mar 22, 2013 @ 12:22pm 
Originally posted by RodeoClown:
But we actually do a lot more than tracking your spending (although that's part of it). [...]
I think the software is pretty great -- obviously I'm biased, being one of the developers -- but I actually bought and used it well before I worked here, and loved it so much that when an opportunity to be part of the team came up, I jumped at it.

Now you made me curious.
I honestly never thought about using a software to organize my expenses.
Will check out what it's all about.
cokebottle Mar 22, 2013 @ 12:24pm 
Mortgages and debts forcing people from their homes in the US. The EU crumbling over debts, unemployment, and housing bubbles.

No, no one has ever had any problems with their finances. Governments or private citizens.

The headlines dominating the news for the last 5 years are not really real - They are just something that happens to people out there, non gamers... Nothing to do with us "real" people.

Not at all...
Brandtner Mar 22, 2013 @ 12:25pm 
Originally posted by wm.:
The real answer is that household expenses get complicated in a family, especially with multiple debts and unexpected expenses [...]

Actually, this is a fair point.
Haven't thought about that, as my experience only includes small to medium sized families at max.
Makes sense when you look at it this way. Thx
Brandtner Mar 22, 2013 @ 12:31pm 
Originally posted by cokebottle:
The EU crumbling over debts, unemployment, and housing bubbles.

Well, if you want to look at it that way, I have to say I kinda doubt this program could've changed anything.
Security measures at the banks didn't work (or were not meant to), as they gave loans to ppl who wouldn't be able to pay back, like, ever. Still the loans were granted.

But this is highly simplified and overall a completely different story.
RodeoClown  [developer] Mar 22, 2013 @ 12:34pm 
Originally posted by Brandtner:
Originally posted by RodeoClown:
But we actually do a lot more than tracking your spending (although that's part of it). [...]
I think the software is pretty great -- obviously I'm biased, being one of the developers -- but I actually bought and used it well before I worked here, and loved it so much that when an opportunity to be part of the team came up, I jumped at it.

Now you made me curious.
I honestly never thought about using a software to organize my expenses.
Will check out what it's all about.

Feel free to ask any questions here, or check out our forums[www.youneedabudget.com], where there's tons of (friendly) users who can answer pretty much *anything* you can think of :)
Saftle Mar 22, 2013 @ 1:35pm 
I at first thought the OP was trolling, but he does have a point, and it's hard to imagine being able to use this software when you're used to the way Germans pay for things in comparison to how people pay bills in the states.

I used to live in the states, and now live in Germany and just purchased this software today. This is why I have a good idea of what the OP is trying to say.

Basically in the states, you are generally billed, and you pay the bill afterwards. Whether that be via cash, check, Credit/Debit card, or a form of auto-bill pay that the bank may provide.

In Germany, the primary method in paying bills is using your online account and you transfer the money directly into theirs, either once a month manually, or in a scheduled payment plan. Checks don't really exist either. Your work automatically deposits your money into your account via the same method that you yourself have when tranferring money into other accounts.

Also, another huge difference is that people don't get paid hourly over here, and instead get a salary. The only income fluctuation that can happen, is when you work more than your contractual hours per month. You then may have a choice to use those hours worked to go towards time off, or you may be able to get paid for those hours (all depends on the job). But most salaries are static aside from raises.

Given those two huge differences, money management is a bit easier over here due to the lack of income fluctuation and the ease to pay bills on time. The thing that this software still provides though, is a way to save up for vacations, bigger purchases, saving, etc.

It was a great deal to pick up today for 17 euros to help manage my savings though.

I hope this clears things up. :D
RodeoClown  [developer] Mar 22, 2013 @ 1:56pm 
Hi Saftle,
One of our devs is German (although he's living in Switzerland at the moment), but we recommend making as much of your bill-paying as possible go automatically. That's how I do things where I am (Australia), and I get also get my pay as a lump sum, rather than hourly, and it gets deposited straight into my bank account. It sounds pretty similar actually :)

YNAB works fine in that situation too.

But even then, if you can plan what money is needed for those bills (and have it ready to go), you can then know what you have left to go towards what you want to spend the rest on. It can be really freeing!

Definitely check out our free classes too!
Brandtner Mar 22, 2013 @ 1:57pm 
Originally posted by Saftle:
[...] I hope this clears things up. :D

You know what - this is exactly why I asked in the first place :)
I had no idea how things work abroad (... and let's be honest, I still have none).

I can confirm what you said regarding the 'German' perspective.
After reading through your post, all this is making much more sense.

Thank you so much, kind sir, for providing me with some insight!
It is much appreciated.
bayne420 Mar 22, 2013 @ 2:04pm 
Perhaps if had a more fluent paycheck income id worry about getting more excessive demands... otherwise i just leave whats in my savings at idle till a bill shows up, even if a rainy day demand as its called. I mean seriously how can u justify for a medical bill without health insurance. So then the bottom line is from the household of available family members that can work... u need to setup a complete set of YNAB. On the otherhand, if u do live alone with a single income... then it becomes nothing more then cutting back on the budgeting of life-sustaining/entertainment properties.

So it does seem to be a good tool for organizing several income amounts, as for solo... doubt there is away to make any practical use for it.
cokebottle Mar 22, 2013 @ 2:28pm 
As a single guy living alone, I have to disagree. :-)

I have never saved so much money as the last year with the help of YNAB. Currently I'm saving up for a long trip to the states this summer. And the best part? It has been almost effortless, and I don't feel I have given up or skimped on anything at all.

A budget that doesn't feel like a straitjacket, who woulda thunk it?
Serneum Mar 22, 2013 @ 4:00pm 
Also a single guy here. Using YNAB, I was able to set aside $400 a month for plane tickets to go see my (now-ex) girlfriend. I've also planned to set aside over $1500 in saving just within the first few months of using YNAB. I would never have been able to set aside money this easily without YNAB or a program similar to it just because of how I viewed extra money at the time
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Date Posted: Mar 22, 2013 @ 12:10pm
Posts: 57