Gnomoria > General Discussions > Topic Details
[Kane]MeatTheGamer Aug 23 @ 4:22pm
New? Take a quick look at this post for some tips.
Here are some thing you might want to know when starting out.

1 When creating a pasture. 1 male if enough for breeding. 1male 9females is what i use in later gameplay.

2 Craft wheelbarrows, buckets and sacks(cotton or wool) to help your gnomes gather more items in a single trip. Wheelbarrows(32 items) Sacks(16) Buckets(unknown, dont use it when i play)

3 Placeing workshops around/near stockpiles will help reduce travel time for your gnomes.
if you want a neat looking village this is not a good option.

4 Stone can be found on -6 depth and lower. Same with ore like coppper.

5 Scout your map before you start playing. If there isnt any water above ground. You might want to restart and remake until you get one. A well can save the life of your gnomes in harsh times.

6 A wall around your village can be helpfull if you have turned off the goblin/mant tunnelers.
But can also be verry helpfull in early games to prevent gnomes from beeing killed by wildlife.

7 When creating custom professions on population tab. Remember to make sure you have chosen the right jobs and priorities.

8 A tinkerers workshop is used to research new tech. You can use multiple tables to research faster.

9 First actions you should make when first starting out is, creating a pasture for your yaks and setting it to max 1male and 7females or whatever is the current limit on your pasture. Create 3 farms that is 4x8 or 32 blocks total for wheat, strawberrys and cotton. Fell trees and get clippings for groves. Then mine down to -6 depth to get some raw stones. And last but not least. Create a crude workbench.

10 Disarm is one of the best options to use for your perk in early/long run. It will disarm mobs and prevent them from dismember your gnomes in battle.

Please write anything i might have missed below guys. lets give the new people some aid.
Thanks alot for reading. And i hope this will prevent you from loosing any gnomes to enemies or the elements.
Showing 1-13 of 13 comments
< >
Ishan451 Aug 23 @ 5:29pm 
Originally posted by KaneMeatTheGamer:
1male 9females is what i use in later gameplay.

That should be decided depending on demand. More Animals mean they require more straw to eat. Goblins + Wildlife can provide an ample supply of meat, so that there is no need to butcher animals, other than to get some leather. So all you probably will need them for is milk and there you probably want to keep your production low so you do not drown in Milk.

Depending on the skill of your Cook, a single cheese omlette can nourish a gnome for almost two days. More than enough to to down in milk, if you have to many animals. And in Gnomoria one should pay attention to not having more in a stockpile than you absolutely need. Any item in the kingdom increases Kingdom Worth which might attract more gnmomes, but also attracts stronger enemies.

Originally posted by KaneMeatTheGamer:
2 Craft wheelbarrows, buckets and sacks(cotton or wool) to help your gnomes gather more items in a single trip. Wheelbarrows(32 items) Sacks(16) Buckets(unknown, dont use it when i play)

Wholely unnecessary to start out with, and even in late game not really useful (learning proper useage of stockpiles, and using temporary stockpiles is in my opinion much more useful). Hauling as task increases Nimbleness Attribute. Having your gnomes haul a lot of single items, means they will start to move faster. Having a slow gnome carry 10 items vs having a fast gnome carry 1 is of course a matter of preferance, but if one does construct the hauling tools later, it does mean you have fast gnomes hauling 10+ items.

Originally posted by KaneMeatTheGamer:
3 Placeing workshops around/near stockpiles will help reduce travel time for your gnomes. if you want a neat looking village this is not a good option.

I disagree. Realistically, if you want to have a real village, people wouldn't travel half a mile to a stockpile for their stuff either. Carpenter would have a wood storage out the back or inside their shop, for example, so they do not need to travel far. It can be made to look nice, so saying "if you want to have a nice looking village that isn't an option is a notion i strongly disagree with.

Originally posted by KaneMeatTheGamer:
5 Scout your map before you start playing. If there isnt any water above ground. You might want to restart and remake until you get one. A well can save the life of your gnomes in harsh times.

Not necessary. Its possible to make your own water source, by digging a pool/pond, and then constructing dirt walls inside the pond with 1 space free between them. Water will collect during rainfall in 1x1 holes. Once these 1x1 holes are at >20% water, you can send a gnome in to tear down the walls, at which point the whole pond should be at >10% water. Voila, your own water source. Craft a well above it and your done. It takes about 2-3 rainfalls to do so.

Originally posted by KaneMeatTheGamer:
6 A wall around your village can be helpfull if you have turned off the goblin/mant tunnelers.

You'll always want a wall/moat or fences around your settlement, it ensures you know where the enemy is coming from.

Originally posted by KaneMeatTheGamer:
8 A tinkerers workshop is used to research new tech. You can use multiple tables to research faster.

Waste of gnome power to have more than 1 workshop.

Originally posted by KaneMeatTheGamer:
9 First actions you should make when first starting out is, creating a pasture for your yaks and setting it to max 1male and 7females or whatever is the current limit on your pasture. Create 3 farms that is 4x8 or 32 blocks total for wheat, strawberrys and cotton. Fell trees and get clippings for groves. Then mine down to -6 depth to get some raw stones. And last but not least. Create a crude workbench.

I advise against mining down, unless you start on a flat map (and you really shouldn't, imho). Mining down without having torches is foolish and quite easily lead to undead spawning from underground, if one does not pay attention enough on which plane one is on. Its better to search a mountain and dig into said mountain/hill. 6-7 level from the surface should be a source of stone. Picking the highest point on the map to reach that, provides added safety from the underground dangers and can be a source of safe stone, early on.

Originally posted by KaneMeatTheGamer:
10 Disarm is one of the best options to use for your perk in early/long run. It will disarm mobs and prevent them from dismember your gnomes in battle.

I wholeheartedly disagree. Outfitting your own gnome with armor, with a woodshield and taunt is much better. Everyone else gets WotG until the settlement is developed enough to craft another full set of armor.
Last edited by Ishan451; Aug 23 @ 5:30pm
utildayael Aug 23 @ 6:42pm 
Originally posted by KaneMeatTheGamer:
Here are some thing you might want to know when starting out.

1 When creating a pasture. 1 male if enough for breeding. 1male 9females is what i use in later gameplay.

Ratio is 1 male to 12 females.

4 Stone can be found on -6 depth and lower. Same with ore like coppper.

-7

5 Scout your map before you start playing. If there isnt any water above ground. You might want to restart and remake until you get one. A well can save the life of your gnomes in harsh times.

Additionally when generating preview you can do narrow hills and max tall to see "exposed rock" as in ... what color of stone you get in your first layer. Once happy with what it is, change sliders back to whatever you want. It's a cheap "preview" so you dont get stuck with sandstone or something on -7.

6 A wall around your village can be helpfull if you have turned off the goblin/mant tunnelers. But can also be verry helpfull in early games to prevent gnomes from beeing killed by wildlife.

A trench also works tho it doesn't block LOS which is both good and bad.

7 When creating custom professions on population tab. Remember to make sure you have chosen the right jobs and priorities.

... and once you get them the way you want you can export them [professions] so on future kingdoms you can import them and save time.

9 <snip> Then mine down to -6 depth to get some raw stones. And last but not least. Create a crude workbench.

-7


* - the -7 depth is based on a flat map, YMMV on non-flat-maps due to mountains
Last edited by utildayael; Aug 23 @ 6:43pm
Vermillion Cardinal Aug 23 @ 8:21pm 
My views on the topic:

1. I use a yak ratio of 1 male to 5-7 females in my settlements, but that's my own little preference. While Ishan is right in his views, I don't mind having excess milk and other goods as merchants can help get rid of them. If in the late game you can support the animals and can handle your enemies, don't sweat over the excess milk and hides (or anything else for that matter).

2. Have your strawberry farms and fruit orchards up early and in most cases wells aren't really necessary; I've never built any myself when I have good wine available. Once you've got a couple of games under your belt you'll generally have some idea of how much land to dedicate to support a basic colony. Buy fruits or drinks to top off if needed. Wheat beer can be made if you lack the fruits for wine, but watch that you don't run out of grain for making sandwiches once you can make those consistently.

3. Digging down to -7 is fine. Ishan's objection to mining down to -6 surprises me as those are considered safe levels and torches aren't needed (unless of course having a natural mountain that reaches to the skies makes enemies spawn closer to the surface; I readily admit to having no experience with that kind of kingdom setup). By all means avoid digging further than that if you lack torches. Also, a kingdom with entirely flat terrain is fine.

I tend to agree with some of the other points expressed by the posters above me, but I'll also say that opinions can vary on some of the more subjective things mentioned. For example, I do agree with WotG early on but I do not reject Disarm out of hand for longer term use. In fact, I've never had any use for taunts whether at the start or towards the late game. New players can rely on other people's tips but should develop their own workable strategies without concern for min-maxing for extreme efficiency unless they really want to.
Last edited by Vermillion Cardinal; Aug 23 @ 8:23pm
Ishan451 Aug 23 @ 8:57pm 
Originally posted by Vermillion Cardinal:
3. Digging down to -7 is fine. Ishan's objection to mining down to -6 surprises me as those are considered safe levels and torches aren't needed (unless of course having a natural mountain that reaches to the skies makes enemies spawn closer to the surface; I readily admit to having no experience with that kind of kingdom setup). By all means avoid digging further than that if you lack torches. Also, a kingdom with entirely flat terrain is fine.

My objection to the advise to dig down right away is based on the fact that enemies start spawning at -7, as you said, but many newbies, and this is supposed to be a newbie guide, might end up digging lower, if they don't start with a flat map (and as i said, i really suggest against it), which can lead to people digging lower to -7 and suddenly having skeletons coming in, and them going "but i followed the suggestion!". Seen all of that already. A newbie guide, in my opinion should encourage proper behavior, not rekless behavior, and as such i feel advising to only really dig below 0 with proper lighting does train the right skills to prevent desater.

Advising to be cautious with digging is, in my experience the right thing to do, when it comes to newbie guides. Stuff like fast expansion playstyles, where you dig down as deep as possible to get all the ores, is in my opinion something you do when you are no longer a newbie and can get your little settlement through the first winter reliably. And in order to do that, its better to start with a non flat map, and search yourself a nice mountain to burrow into. It just bears less risks overall.

I believe that if you manage to get to year 2 reliably, you are no longer a newbie :p

Also the reason why i advise against a flat map, is the existance of mountains. Simply removing the ramps of the floor level of a lonely mountain, means you can have access to the whole mountain (above the level of the removed ramps), as long as it doesn't touch the map border, and farm in relative safety on said mountain. It does make things a lot easier. Also it has the added benefit of having to dig less deep, and thus risking to spawn all sorts of nasties that can eat your poppulation.

Originally posted by Vermillion Cardinal:
I tend to agree with some of the other points expressed by the posters above me, but I'll also say that opinions can vary on some of the more subjective things mentioned. For example, I do agree with WotG early on but I do not reject Disarm out of hand for longer term use. In fact, I've never had any use for taunts whether at the start or towards the late game.

Disarm is nice, in late game. I always would have a single Disarming Gnome in my squads. It just doesn't make a lot of sense in the early game, especially as newbie suggestion. I mean i also like the rogue perk (forgot its name), which gives backstab bonus, for one of the gnomes. It works nice if you combine it with someone with taunt.

Originally posted by Vermillion Cardinal:
New players can rely on other people's tips but should develop their own workable strategies without concern for min-maxing for extreme efficiency unless they really want to.

Always... its also why i feel general guides are bad. For example, I see a lot of people advising to expand quickly, in order to get lots of gnomes, trying to stay ahead of the power curve by having more gnomes to quickly get your gnome into steel, and while i get that this is a nice way to play the game, its also in my opinion entirely unsuited for a newbie. As newbie slow and steady wins the race. The first winter is a challenge on its own.
Last edited by Ishan451; Aug 23 @ 8:59pm
utildayael Aug 23 @ 9:24pm 
I think a lot of things vary based on how you play. I know you start slow Ishan while Arryu starts fairly fast and I've taken advice from both of you. :) You find what works via trial and error and tend to gravitate one way or the other. I think there are plenty of valid ways to play the game.

Key for me, at least as I read guides and got advice, was knowing what things flat out don't work [being bugged or just plain being so underpowered its worthless] and the overall "here's how ___ works" going over the game mechanics.

BTW... I don' t think mobs spawn on -7 do they? Thought since it was first stone floor that it was "safe" ... of course something could come up a ramp from a chasm below...


I believe that if you manage to get to year 2 reliably, you are no longer a newbie :p

Woot! I graduated. :)
Last edited by utildayael; Aug 23 @ 9:25pm
Ishan451 Aug 23 @ 9:42pm 
Originally posted by utildayael:
I think a lot of things vary based on how you play. I know you start slow Ishan while Arryu starts fairly fast and I've taken advice from both of you. :)

Actually, the way i understood it, Arryu, doesn't play that much different from me. He also does take it slow until around year 3 or 4, and then he does rush down to Steel.

Compared to my style, where i do only start to really increase my kingdom worth when i start to get bored (because my gnomes own everything).

But from what i understand Arryu and my style is pretty much the same for the first 3ish years.


Originally posted by utildayael:
BTW... I don' t think mobs spawn on -7 do they? Thought since it was first stone floor that it was "safe" ... of course something could come up a ramp from a chasm below...

I just checked the wiki and it -8, my fault, entirely. :)
Last edited by Ishan451; Aug 23 @ 9:44pm
utildayael Aug 23 @ 9:44pm 
Originally posted by Ishan451:
I just checked the wiki and it -8, my fault, entirely. :)

I only knew that from having read a whole crapton of guides when I started playing this thing not all too long ago. Haha. Could I quote you the floors that diff metals spawn on? No clue. I think Iron is -42? Hell I dunno. But -7... I can remember that one! :)
Ishan451 Aug 23 @ 9:53pm 
Originally posted by utildayael:
Could I quote you the floors that diff metals spawn on? No clue. I think Iron is -42? Hell I dunno. But -7... I can remember that one! :)

Hey, i light every inch of my base (i even light outside).. so... its not that important to me when they do spawn :D And i readily will admit, that i am not to deep in the nitty gritty, minmaxing type of thing. I mean if you would want to there are all sorts of minimaxing things, like how much farmland you need per gnome (which is i believe 12) but i think it takes a lot of fun out of the game to minimax and keep all the "numbers" in your head all the time.... besides.. i sometimes take prolonged breaks from playing gnomoria and i tend to forget the stuff :) I remember last time when i started i didn't even really dare to mine below 0 :D

I edited my last post, by the by.
utildayael Aug 23 @ 10:41pm 
Originally posted by Ishan451:
I edited my last post, by the by.

You. Arryu. Syphin. Etc. It all blends together. I just know most folks on the thread were pretty aggressive and you were pretty passive in the builds. :)

Only numbers I remember as far as min/max goes is 16. That's space between torches when I grid-mine! I hate making a billion torches [I'm always out of coal anyway] so try to be efficient in that regard. I carve out my areas I'm mining in 16x16 grids and torch the corners. I can then go back and rip out the entire square with impunity. Somtimes I change it up and do the straight strip mines but eh. :)
Vermillion Cardinal Aug 24 @ 3:07am 
When it comes to torches I make estimates on distance and place them to maximize their coverage in the tunnels I build; I place them at intersections and, if needed, mine out more area than is necessary to spread light into the niches where my gnomes are actively mining. It relies quite a lot on the mining exploit as I prefer precision mining and not clearing out whole levels (I hate mining into chasms as well). The cost of torches is nothing to me since I clear out the stock of any lumber camp merchants that drop by; wood is available from them cheaply and in large quantities as well.

I've never favored mountainous maps simply because I dislike the hassle of leveling areas for farming and pastures. The most I'll accept is a low, wide hill just to avoid the total lack of terrain features. My current kingdom has a short tower constructed on top of a one tile high hill to the west of a medium-sized pond. -1 is the industrial zone, -2 is residential.

As for Disarm, my current squad setup is 3 Sword Disarmers, 1 Axe Hobbler (as I call the Knock 'em Down perk), and 1 Axe Finisher (Finish Them). I never end battle without at least half a dozen goblins missing their limbs or head; reading the combat logs never ceases to amuse. I guess that's also partly because I underestimated how weak they are at 0.5 strength even though I doubled the rate and size of their raids; when a party of 13 goblins and 2 ogres has 5 goblin raiders and the rest wearing varying amounts of armor, you can't really expect them to not lose something.

I tend to start off pretty slow myself, but I don't keep to a very low worth like some would advocate. The biggest limitation on my rate of growth is how much/fast I can trade for metals, since I only mine in occasional spurts.

Anyway, we should post a few more tips or else this thread will be seriously derailed. I'll add that leather armor for civilians is pretty good, at least in my experience. With all the extra hides from farm animals and wandering ones I usually have basic armor available, with further progression to bear and ogre armor as the quantity allows. As long as your gnome workers aren't overwhelmingly outnumbered they can survive long enough with leather against a goblin or three.
Ishan451 Aug 24 @ 6:32am 
Originally posted by utildayael:
Originally posted by Ishan451:
I edited my last post, by the by.

You. Arryu. Syphin. Etc. It all blends together. I just know most folks on the thread were pretty aggressive and you were pretty passive in the builds. :)

I am, but i am just saying that from what i understand Arryu also starts out a little more passive, until his gnomes are ready to handle the rapid expansion he does. And that is my entire point. Knowing when your gnomes are ready to handle expansion, no matter how big it is, is an experience thing.

Originally posted by Vermillion Cardinal:
I've never favored mountainous maps simply because I dislike the hassle of leveling areas for farming and pastures. The most I'll accept is a low, wide hill just to avoid the total lack of terrain features. My current kingdom has a short tower constructed on top of a one tile high hill to the west of a medium-sized pond. -1 is the industrial zone, -2 is residential.

Its not necessary to level mountains, you can just terraform them enough so you can have a flat field for a pasture. It might be a little more hassle to designate the pasture, because its no straight box, but you can easily designate and extend them around the side of the mountain and do terrace farming.

Also leveling the area produces a lot of Dirt, which can be used to prospect, creating all kinds of metal slivers, without even needing to dig below 0. And its an activity you can save for Winter, when most of your workers idle anyway. That way, they'll be busy. Gnomes shouldn't idle. And Idling gnome is a gnome that could train.

Originally posted by Vermillion Cardinal:
Anyway, we should post a few more tips or else this thread will be seriously derailed.

Discussing different strategies and showing alternatives to the tips given, isn't exactly derailment, but pointing out that there is no right answer, and if the initial tip doesn't work, trying another strategy discussed by those disgreeing might be the way to go.

Like for example, i countered the "got no natural water on the map, restart" tip with an explanation on how to make your own water source. Although i will admit that pointing out that people that rush also take it slower to start with, and do not go crazy with digging right away, might have been gone long enough now.


But sure.. lets do some more tips:

1) For an easy start, try to remain with your Kingdom Worth below 2500+(years*2500), until you got a grip on the game. If the game is to boring that way, you can simply increase your kingdom worth above that number (slowly), until you notice your struggling.

2) For your first Winter, nothing grows in winter, you should have a stock of 20 Drink and 20 Food for each of your gnomes and 20 weath per yak. This means if you have 10 gnomes you should have a stock of 200 Food and 200 Drink A stock like this should be good enough to keep your gnomes alive until the first harvest in spring can be done, even if you get more gnomes in Winter.

3) Unharvested Fruits and Grain on the fields and groves do not spoil (currently) and do not raise your kingdom worth. Its a good idea to have a few suspended Apple Orchyards tugged away to the sides of your colony, which can be tapped for emergency source of Food and Drink, or even Wood.

4) When felling trees, always clip them first. It creates a sappling that can be either sold to merchants or to replant a tree, so you do not run out of trees.

5) You can call in a Merchant by calling an Ambassador from a friendly Kingdom. Even if the Ambassador leaves later, because your not ready to meet their demands, they will bring a Merchant along.
Last edited by Ishan451; Aug 24 @ 6:34am
utildayael Aug 24 @ 8:41am 
Originally posted by Ishan451:
I am, but i am just saying that from what i understand Arryu also starts out a little more passive, until his gnomes are ready to handle the rapid expansion he does. And that is my entire point. Knowing when your gnomes are ready to handle expansion, no matter how big it is, is an experience thing.

I agree and like I said, I probably misquoted Arryu but the main point was you can be successful with fast or slow starts. :) I fully agree on the point of it being a learning thing as far as expansion goes! I generally find myself spreading too thin many times and almost always shoot myself in the foot for any large construction projects.

5) You can call in a Merchant by calling an Ambassador from a friendly Kingdom. Even if the Ambassador leaves later, because your not ready to meet their demands, they will bring a Merchant along.

This is a handy tip I never see in guides. I make sure to do it on day 1! :)
[Kane]MeatTheGamer Aug 28 @ 4:08pm 
bumpersticker
Showing 1-13 of 13 comments
< >
Per page: 15 30 50