LostParadise Sep 1, 2013 @ 7:20am
Ubuntu and updated drivers
Hi,
there is one think I'm thinking and worrying about...
On Steam website you advertise Ubuntu as the recommended platform...
I agree with you opinion,but there is one think i cannot understand...
Ubuntu considers that is the most user friendly platform, but i cannot understand what is the logic behind updating the graphics driver...
For example NVIDIA released a few days before their new updated drivers 325.15 which contains alot of fixes and optimizations...Me as an Arch Linux -and advanced- user i got the new driver after a few days just by updating my system...On the other hand Ubuntu users have to search in the internet,and after that, they have try to add a custom ppa(which is not a simple task to do,and also you are not sure if the ppa will continue to update) and probably after an distribution update break their system(I have been in this situations many times before)...
So my question is...Is it so hard for Cannonical and/or you Steam/Valve guys to provide an nvidia-latest or amd-latest package which will contain always the latest driver?
Thanks for reading!
Showing 1-15 of 17 comments
< >
pretty noose Sep 1, 2013 @ 7:51am 
Do you mean for Ubuntu or for everyone? I presume you mean for Ubuntu. I certainly don't want Valve attempting to update the NVIDIA package on my Arch system. The only thing they should be updating is Steam.
LostParadise Sep 1, 2013 @ 8:13am 
Originally posted by pretty noose:
Do you mean for Ubuntu or for everyone? I presume you mean for Ubuntu. I certainly don't want Valve attempting to update the NVIDIA package on my Arch system. The only thing they should be updating is Steam.

Of course I mean only Ubuntu...Arch is always updated and its community is composed by advanced users...The think I dont understand with Ubuntu is why they dont give to their users the ability to always have the latest(and greatest) driver...Especially now that every update contains many fixes and there are so many games released every week...
Last edited by LostParadise; Sep 1, 2013 @ 9:09am
pretty noose Sep 1, 2013 @ 8:44am 
Well yes, I see what you mean in that case :)
Sin Sep 5, 2013 @ 3:03pm 
What are you suggesting? Ubuntu does update graphics drivers and you can easily upgrade using the PPAs. Xorg swat or xorg edgers would be where the nvidia drivers are located. These PPAs are not supported by Cannonical and you should understand that a lot of Ubuntu's packages actually come from Debian unstable/experimental. Infact, none of this has anything to do with Cannonical and is more to do with the Ubuntu team's collaboration with the Debian community regarding PPAs and the packages therein.
LostParadise Sep 6, 2013 @ 3:46am 
Originally posted by RAVEN MCCCXXXVII:
What are you suggesting? Ubuntu does update graphics drivers and you can easily upgrade using the PPAs. Xorg swat or xorg edgers would be where the nvidia drivers are located. These PPAs are not supported by Cannonical and you should understand that a lot of Ubuntu's packages actually come from Debian unstable/experimental. Infact, none of this has anything to do with Cannonical and is more to do with the Ubuntu team's collaboration with the Debian community regarding PPAs and the packages therein.


Wait...Valve Recommends Ubuntu as the most user friendly distro...You are telling me the there are 2 PPAs avaliable...Check the Xorg swat...
https://launchpad.net/~ubuntu-x-swat/+archive/x-updates
it is outdated...So I cannot easily upgrade using PPAs...especially stuff like graphics card's drivers...I told my suggestion above...I my opinion there sould be one nvdia-latest(or amd or inter) package by default which will containt ALWAYS the latest driver just by one click...Using custom PPAs for basic components like kernel or GPU drivers is wrong in my opinion... Especially for new users...
Sin Sep 6, 2013 @ 4:01am 
Originally posted by LostParadise:
Originally posted by RAVEN MCCCXXXVII:
What are you suggesting? Ubuntu does update graphics drivers and you can easily upgrade using the PPAs. Xorg swat or xorg edgers would be where the nvidia drivers are located. These PPAs are not supported by Cannonical and you should understand that a lot of Ubuntu's packages actually come from Debian unstable/experimental. Infact, none of this has anything to do with Cannonical and is more to do with the Ubuntu team's collaboration with the Debian community regarding PPAs and the packages therein.


Wait...Valve Recommends Ubuntu as the most user friendly distro...You are telling me the there are 2 PPAs avaliable...Check the Xorg swat...
https://launchpad.net/~ubuntu-x-swat/+archive/x-updates
it is outdated...So I cannot easily upgrade using PPAs...especially stuff like graphics card's drivers...I told my suggestion above...I my opinion there sould be one nvdia-latest(or amd or inter) package by default which will containt ALWAYS the latest driver just by one click...Using custom PPAs for basic components like kernel or GPU drivers is wrong in my opinion... Especially for new users...

Xorg swat would contain legacy drivers; however Xorg edgers would contain the latest 'bleeding-edge' drivers. Updates can only occur if you still have the PPA, and some people choose to remove the PPA to 'freeze' the nvidia driver so that they don't update/upgrade/change it lest performance be compromised. The great thing about Debian/Ubuntu is that you have the power to do that, on Arch Linux you are forced to update everything!
pretty noose Sep 6, 2013 @ 7:11am 
@Raven - "on Arch Linux you are forced to update everything!"

Utter BS. You've obviously never used Arch. You don't have to update *anything*, *ever* if you don't want. You're in total control. You can even downgrade stuff. Wow, it's like magic.

Plus, I don't have to fart about with PPAs to get the latest software *or* to freeze packages.
Last edited by pretty noose; Sep 6, 2013 @ 7:13am
Sin Sep 6, 2013 @ 7:22am 
Originally posted by pretty noose:
@Raven - "on Arch Linux you are forced to update everything!"

Utter BS. You've obviously never used Arch. You don't have to update *anything*, *ever* if you don't want. You're in total control. You can even downgrade stuff. Wow, it's like magic.

Plus, I don't have to fart about with PPAs to get the latest software *or* to freeze packages.

The reason why we have PPAs is for security reasons because not every package can be included in the base repository lest users may download malicious packages. Another thing is that packages need to be signed before they are in such respositories. Arch Linux has no system of signing packages thus making any package unsafe. Wherefore, the PPA system is much better because it gives users the power to control which packages to include for installation on their system. Think of PPAs as modules which you can take advantage of for your pleasure.
pretty noose Sep 6, 2013 @ 7:47am 
Arch has package signing and has had it for a while now. Your information is outdated and misleading.
John Sep 10, 2013 @ 11:14pm 
The X-swat PPA used to be kept up to date but after NVIDIA put the 7000 and 6000 series cards into a legacy branch, the PPA has been a mess and it's become annoying to deal with NVIDIA drivers on Ubuntu.

You can do xorg-edgers but you have to constantly deal with enabling and disabling the PPA so you don't bring in other X packages on system updates or get a beta driver. And now you have to uninstall the previous driver version and install the new one because the package names are different (nvidia-319 vs. nvidia-325). There are CUDA problems out the wazoo. It's just a real mess.

Honestly, just to put it out there... it's obvious that the people prepping these distro setups don't even use them on a regular basis. File a bug in LaunchPad and it gets ignored. I really have no idea what has happened to Canonical lately. They've just been totally phoning it in it seems. Valve is going to have to pick up the slack in areas that frankly they shouldn't even have to worry about.
Benjamin Sep 11, 2013 @ 4:06am 
Originally posted by pretty noose:
@Raven - "on Arch Linux you are forced to update everything!"

Utter BS. You've obviously never used Arch. You don't have to update *anything*, *ever* if you don't want. You're in total control. You can even downgrade stuff. Wow, it's like magic.

Plus, I don't have to fart about with PPAs to get the latest software *or* to freeze packages.

This is very true. As a long long time Ubuntu user, having to manage handfuls of PPAs just to get current software is redicuIous. Especially since often a specific PPA will also have other system packages included that need to be upgraded/downgraded as well. Programs such as ppa-purge were a necessity sometimes just to keep the system running.

I use Arch now and, while I wouldn't recommend it to inexperienced users, It has really opened my eyes to the elegance of a rolling release distribution. The yearly or bi-anual release style is really made for servers, but seem really out of place on the Desktop once you use something like Arch.
Last edited by Benjamin; Sep 11, 2013 @ 4:08am
LostParadise Sep 11, 2013 @ 11:01am 
I'm happy to see that alot of people agree with me...
In my opinion Ubuntu should be an advertisement for Linux. But it is everything but this..
I'm using it since 7.10 and it still suffers on the same stupid thinks...outdated packages without a serious reason,you must add PPAs just to have the basic stuff(like an updated driver,or an updated program)...I can see the reason not to have a rolling release model(more stable kernel,more stable GUI)....but not to provide the option to have the latest driver, or the latest version of a program(which in most cases contains many critical fixes) makes no sense...
Last edited by LostParadise; Sep 11, 2013 @ 11:02am
Sin Sep 13, 2013 @ 6:00am 
Originally posted by LostParadise:
I'm happy to see that alot of people agree with me...
In my opinion Ubuntu should be an advertisement for Linux. But it is everything but this..
I'm using it since 7.10 and it still suffers on the same stupid thinks...outdated packages without a serious reason,you must add PPAs just to have the basic stuff(like an updated driver,or an updated program)...I can see the reason not to have a rolling release model(more stable kernel,more stable GUI)....but not to provide the option to have the latest driver, or the latest version of a program(which in most cases contains many critical fixes) makes no sense...

Ubuntu is already an advertisement for Linux, as in it helps the transition to Linux as easiest as possible. Regardless, Ubuntu uses Debian's PPA system so Ubuntu isn't at fault here necessarily. Because Ubuntu just uses packages from Debian, it's rather the latter at fault.
Benjamin Sep 17, 2013 @ 7:57am 
I think many people would argue that something like Mint, or OpenSUSE are better "first distros" than Ubuntu is. Ubuntu used to be THE distro for new users, but I would think twice before recommending it now.
Sin Sep 17, 2013 @ 8:22am 
Originally posted by Benjamin:
I think many people would argue that something like Mint, or OpenSUSE are better "first distros" than Ubuntu is. Ubuntu used to be THE distro for new users, but I would think twice before recommending it now.

That sounds nice, but how are openSUSE and Mint arguably better than Ubuntu? What makes them better?
Showing 1-15 of 17 comments
< >
Per page: 15 30 50