Steam for Linux > Non-Valve Games > Topic Details
[Panic 13] Inigo Montoya Feb 21, 2014 @ 9:57pm
X-Com 1, 2, and 3 (and any other DOSBox based game) in Linux?
Random question. What would it take to get games like X-Com 1, 2, and 3 to run in Linux through Steam? I mean, I know I can just install DOSBox, grab the games from any given "abandonware" site and be done with it. But I bought the games through Steam because the games are awesome (actually, bought them many times over because they're awesome), and I'd like to show that I am playing games on Steam in Linux.

So for games that run in DOSBox, I imagine that the port to Linux would be trivial. The question is, who is responsible for that? Is that in Steam's court for offering up a different download of the game bundled with the Linux executable of DOSBox? Or is that in the court of whoever owns that franchise at this point?
Showing 1-11 of 11 comments
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Satoru Feb 21, 2014 @ 11:39pm 
Publoishers/developers are responslible for the content,.

btw 'abandonware' does not exist. It is a lie perpetrated by thieves to justify their theft of content. There is copyrighted content, and public domain. That's it. If something was made in your lifetime, it's copyrighted.
Last edited by Satoru; Feb 21, 2014 @ 11:41pm
Roxor128 Feb 22, 2014 @ 12:09am 
Yes it is trivial. You don't need to do any porting at all. Just supply a Linux executable for DOSBox.

Unfortunately, it's up to the publishers, so go make some noise on the game's forums and maybe they'll listen if you make enough.
phschm May 11, 2014 @ 8:38am 
What is this linux executable for DOSBox? Is the executable not using DOS calls instead of linux system calls (or windows for that matter). Even the machine code, at worst, would be 16bits x86, but then they would be emulated the same way by DOSBox for both windows and linux.

Abandonware means software that is no longer maintained, it does not have anything to do with copyright.

Steam supplying support for system installed compatibility software would be a huge advantage for everyone involved. The sellers would not need to care about it themselves, possibly even fixing failures like the scummvm not working on some distributions as is happening with 7th-Guest without any effort from them. Players would not need to be burdened by the several independent copies and would enjoy greatly increase portability in general. As an example, imagine now all those RPGMaker games continuing to be windows exclusives in the event of a client interface being made available for other platforms.

All that is needed is for the games that use them to be labeled as such, so instead of a Windows/MAC/Linux game it would be a DOSBox/SCUMMVM/AIR/RPGMaker etc game, as already is the case by the way, albeit indirectly.
Fork_Q2 May 11, 2014 @ 9:06am 
Copyright has to be enforced by the copyright holder, if they express no intrest in defending it, it is then an orphaned work.

Originally posted by phschm:
Abandonware means software that is no longer maintained, it does not have anything to do with copyright.

I disagree with the other poster, but this is also incorrect. If this were true, older versions of Windows would be "abandonware", as would virtually most games on Steam come to think of it. It has everything to do with copyright.

Abandonware means that the copyright holder no longer expresses any intrest in upholding their copyright privledges, aren't contactable or it is unclear who actually owns the copyright. In which case it becomes an orphaned work (aka, abandonware), and this is a real, recognised legal entity in most countries.
Last edited by Fork_Q2; May 11, 2014 @ 9:12am
Fork_Q2 May 11, 2014 @ 9:12am 
Originally posted by Satoru:
Publoishers/developers are responslible for the content,.

btw 'abandonware' does not exist. It is a lie perpetrated by thieves to justify their theft of content. There is copyrighted content, and public domain. That's it. If something was made in your lifetime, it's copyrighted.

This is incorrect; orphaned works are a real thing, there are different licensing options for orphan works existing for different countries.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orphan_works#Specifics_by_country
Last edited by Fork_Q2; May 11, 2014 @ 9:27am
Not Mr Flibble May 11, 2014 @ 9:18am 
Originally posted by Satoru:
btw 'abandonware' does not exist. It is a lie perpetrated by thieves to justify their theft of content.
Theft involves taking the item from the owner, such that he is then deprived of said item. What you refer to is copyright infringement – illegal copying. It is not theft.

That said, where no commercial interest remains, various copyright holders have either ignored the copying or have explicitly released the software with varying degrees of freedom – for example, the content of archives of software for 8-bit home computers. Then there are the remakes for DOS, Windows, GNU/Linux etc.

There is copyrighted content, and public domain.
Yes – content which is currently subject to copyright, and content which either never was subject to copyright or for which copyright has expired.

(I'm ignoring orphan works here.)
Last edited by Not Mr Flibble; May 11, 2014 @ 9:22am
Fork_Q2 May 11, 2014 @ 9:24am 
Linux's trademark (not copyright, my bad) is owned by wholly by the Linux Foundation, just as Mozilla owns the Firefox logo and brand, even if the source code is free and open source. You cannot use the image of Tux or the word "Linux" in your product without their permission. This is to prevent companies like MS or Oracle from claiming that they are "Linux".

Edit: WRONG!!!! Replaced copyright with trademark.
Last edited by Fork_Q2; May 11, 2014 @ 9:36am
Not Mr Flibble May 11, 2014 @ 9:30am 
Fork_Q, you're confusing copyright with trademarks.
Fork_Q2 May 11, 2014 @ 9:31am 
Originally posted by Not Mr Flibble:
Fork_Q, you're confusing copyright with trademarks.

♥♥♥♥, you are correct. Time for more coffee.
Last edited by Fork_Q2; May 11, 2014 @ 9:35am
Zyro May 12, 2014 @ 3:23am 
If you don't have the explicit rights, you are nor allowed to do it.
No matter how you call it or how you don't want it to be called.
Last edited by Zyro; May 12, 2014 @ 3:25am
[Panic 13] Inigo Montoya May 17, 2014 @ 9:38am 
Just a follow up to this, I've sent out a number of emails to various companies whose DOSBox based games I'd like to see come to Linux. Some have been pretty receptive of the idea. These games don't generate a lot of money, but the requirement for getting them on to Linux is pretty trivial. So if you'd like to see some of these games come to Linux, make sure you send out a kindly worded email to the publishers.
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