Steam for Linux > Limited Beta > Emneoplysninger
Karashata 9. dec 2012 kl. 1:11pm
Is there a way to install Steam games to a partition other than the OS partition?
I have my computer set up with two different Linux OS partitions and one large data partition which is shared between them, I would prefer to keep the OS partitions as small as possible to ensure maximum space available to the data partition for my personal files and the like. Is there any way to tell the Steam Linux client to install its games to that data partition rather than the OS partition, so I can keep the OS partitions as small as possible (and potentially be able to install Steam for Linux on both OSes and access the installed games from either OS)?
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BK| Da Syntax 9. dec 2012 kl. 1:16pm 
What filesystem do you use on your data partition? If its formatted in ext format you could try to use a symlink to your data partition
André 9. dec 2012 kl. 1:32pm 
You can mount this data partition on /home in both OSs.
Andrew 9. dec 2012 kl. 1:46pm 
I'm actually installing SfL (Steam For Linux) as we speak, I don't know where this update is being installed without using iotop..
Camouflage 9. dec 2012 kl. 3:33pm 
You can move and link your ~/Steam directory on another disk:
mv Steam /mnt/disk
ln -s /mnt/disk/Steam
(this assumes you have mounted your disk at /mnt/disk and steam is not running)
Alternatively you could probably change the symlinks in ~/.steam, but they seem to change after setting that single one.
Karashata 29. dec 2012 kl. 3:35pm 
I did notice after looking around a bit that Steam does dump everything into the home directory rather than following the traditional Linux folder structure, so moving the Steam data from home to the data partition and symlinking to it should work just the same as everything else I've done that with.

In any case, thanks for the replies.
Sidst redigeret af Karashata; 29. dec 2012 kl. 3:36pm
Karashata 29. dec 2012 kl. 3:57pm 
Okay, at first I has a small issue with Steam still looking at the root partition for the available free space, turns out most of the data is in ~/.local/share/Steam, and just symlinked to from ~/.steam. Moving both folders to the data partition and creating symlinks for both folders fixed that, Steam now recognizes the data partition as its home and sees the free space available there. I should also now be able to use the same client and data on my other OS as well once I can get the installer working there.
thechef 1. jan 2013 kl. 3:37am 
I use to have /home on a separate partition or hard drive. This way you have a "setup once and forget about it" which covers many usecases - any usually this is just the right seperation between "system" and "data", but I rather refer to it as "managed" and "unmanaged" by the package manager, because both can contain "system"-ish and "data"-ish stuff.

That's an advantage when you happen to deal with backups. You just need the list of desired packages and repositories to restore the "managed" part.

The "unmanaged" part of course is precious, because it's mainly created by you or hard to restore (all your settings, assume you install many games in /home, there are many unmanaged ones still, windows games too) and also grows fast (as you use it). It's reasonable to have a separate backup strategy and a separate partition or hard drive for that.
Asariati 1. jan 2013 kl. 6:44pm 
Steam has a Libraries-Feature, where your games are installed. Go to Settings -> Downloads and Cloud -> Steam Library Folders (bottom part of the window). There you can add a second library wherever you want. When new games will be installed, you can choose into which library they are installed.
Karashata 5. jan 2013 kl. 4:41pm 
I see, however, moving the folders from my home folder to the data partition worked easily enough. I took a look at that though anyway, and not surprisingly, it recognizes the data partition as the Steam library folder.
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