Steam for Linux > Discussões gerais > Detalhes do tópico
johndrinkwater [🐧︀ 🎮] 19/nov/2012 às 8:32
Steam is coming, what next for linux gamers?
Thought the next step for gamers is input devices, to have them work from the get‐go, so started with a small post on the Logitech forums.
http://forums.logitech.com/t5/G-series-Gaming-Mice/A-Plea-for-Driver-Util-support-on-Linux/td-p/921204#

If you’re willing to post thoughtful replies there, please do.

And beyond that, what else do you see as needed on our platform, better audio card support, controller support, gaming headsets?
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LOLCAT 19/nov/2012 às 8:50 
First we need games. Luxury hardware is useless if there's nothing to play.
aligator Linux AC/DC YeahWTF?! 19/nov/2012 às 8:57 
I think the most important are better drivers for graphic cards ...
johndrinkwater [🐧︀ 🎮] 19/nov/2012 às 8:58 
Escrito originalmente por LOLCAT:
First we need games. Luxury hardware is useless if there's nothing to play.
We have games coming and lousy hardware support for even the cheapest of gaming mice.
RobotMenace 19/nov/2012 às 9:03 
The only hardware I've ever had real problems with is certain printers, which isn't really a problem for games.

Using those stupid million button mouses is easy https://help.ubuntu.com/community/ManyButtonsMouseHowto

PulseAudio needs work if like me you like listening to stuff/watching videos while playing games.

Proprietary video drivers need to stop dragging their feet supporting EGL and the like. Yes, proper vendor supported FOSS drivers would be preferable but it's not going to happen.
Última edição por RobotMenace; 19/nov/2012 às 9:10
Flaming Sapz 19/nov/2012 às 9:04 
We definitely need to keep the momentum going but I think it would be best to start with getting other developers to make ports of their games, then work our way to hardware.
Zoktar 19/nov/2012 às 11:52 
I have been looking into openhardware, open source for hardware. Where the specs are available to everyone, and you simple need to aquire the parts and put it together. Or preferably someone would do that for your. All the documentation on all the hardware parts that have this opensource license would be there. So creating the drivers/software would be a breeze, and would make it self available crossplatform. I like this option for a number of reasons beyond it just beeing fully documented components. Like the mod options, possibility of a embeded linux inside, network over usb. ssh into your mouse , handle your special scripts and bindings or even small programs. Essecially complete controll over the device. This is also usefull for various workflows in creation type modes, cad, gimp etc. Again complete controll over the device. Another thing would be exact same behaviour cross platform!, wich is a big deal if you ask me, my mouse's behave completly different between windows and linux, and then again inside games.

Now i do not know yet of what components would be required to get a opensource lincese on to complete a fully blown opensource gaming mouse. Theres the lazor(s) and its interface/kontroller, the plastic or metal casing, the buttons, etc. I would opt to have the lazor/cotnroller/chip into one slottable format, you then would create a various range of shells you insert the "lazor-sensor/chip/interface board" into. For further tailored customization. And hopefully some day be able to 3d print your perfect shell, wich you just slide your board into. Should be no concern about the ammount of buttons since im guessing we could have something on it to handle any ammount of buttons if we wanted to. limitation only by the shell of your selection.

On the question of having this hacker style gaming perifierial i say, Let the games set the limitation not the hardware. Then there is the combat of cheaters, with a mouse like this you possibly have some sort of encrypted punkbuster running from your mouse to a gameserver, where find that your accually using your mouse to target things and not running an autoaimbot, for instance. Ofc this might be eventually hacked aswell, but still might be a viable method of pushing back hacking a bit. Atleast for mouse movement.

Im guessing aquireing parts like these to compete with other gaming mice might bump up the total of the mouseboard, but then again, if it has quality parts with decent shock resistance, it might be a bit more expensive, but it might also last you longer. And just replace shells when needed.

you could grab a few slabs of clay, and mould your perfect sized mouse place your buttons where you like and pay for a print, one day.

Alot of games suffer between gameplay design with intended user control, acual crippled user control, resulting in less fun game. What stands before your is not a challenging strategic/teamworking/cordination/precision intelligent task, you die because you where denied the for mentioned intended user controll.

If you fail because of lack of tactics. poor cordination and teamwork, thats a good fail. if you fail to execute an intended mechanic within the gamplay because of poor user controll implementation, thats a fail on teh game, and sucks the life of an other possibly great game.

This is not just a problem in one game, there are so many others that suffer greatly because of this. What games need is to translate the intended user control, into accual user control if we are to move past crutches of poor controls, and into ramped up challenges, as teamwork cordination and a bunch of friends getting better at a game working togheter through challenging tasks that is what most big titels offer.

And this really hasnt been that avaible until now.

A opensource linux/ubuntu/steam mouse like this would be a real nice opening for steam/gaming on linux!.(and every other damn platform, opensource forever^^)

Sorry for wall of text.
Última edição por Zoktar; 19/nov/2012 às 12:02
[Linux] MrSchism 19/nov/2012 às 13:40 
What we need is drivers in general, not new hardware to get new drivers for. It's one of the reasons I opt to use my older hardware for beta testing. So many vendors develop hardware to fix problems presented with previous hardware/drivers that they forget to actually fix the driver to resolve the issue.

FOR EXAMPLE:
Madwifi was a great idea: a universal(ish) driver, but people wanted to do more and more weird stuff on devices that didn't support the aforementioned "weird stuff" and the driver wasn't able to handle it so it stopped getting used and eventually depreciated. It made using certain devices (ralink ra2500 series chipset) tolerable instead of having 1/10 actual download speed. The driver is over 4 years old. While it is a legacy device, they've known about the issue for at least 8 years and all that's happened is releasing a small patch to lessen the issue (it goes from 5% performance to 10% performance) and releasing a new chipset.
blackout24 19/nov/2012 às 14:04 
Never had any driver issues on linux to be honest. I'd only wish that nvidia wasn't the only viable graphics card vendor for people who want to game on linux. That alone would help alot.
johndrinkwater [🐧︀ 🎮] 19/nov/2012 às 14:09 
Escrito originalmente por RobotMenace:
Using those stupid million button mouses is easy https://help.ubuntu.com/community/ManyButtonsMouseHowto

I don’t mind editing files to get buttons supported, but an average user wouldn’t. And then remapping per game, use? Get dynamic-dpi buttons to work? Stuff like that would be great if built in and supported…

Then there’s stuff like a Nostromo gaming pad, needs a 3rd party utility from launchpad that is complex to use.
Última edição por johndrinkwater [🐧︀ 🎮]; 19/nov/2012 às 14:10
RobotMenace 20/nov/2012 às 7:37 
Escrito originalmente por johndrinkwater:
I don’t mind editing files to get buttons supported, but an average user wouldn’t.

Ah, didn't think of that. I forget that people who're more than happy with the most complex gui are sometimes scared by even simple config files.

Someone almost certainly will make a nice gui once demand increses even a smidgen, if one doesn't exist already somewhere out there.

Escrito originalmente por johndrinkwater:
And then remapping per game, use?

Well I'd have thought of that as a plus myself. Different mapping for different apps, there's not only games where people like an OTT mouse. You have to configure it somewhere anyhows, what difference does it make it been in the game or the wider OS? But I guess been able to set a default to be used unless there's a programme specific profile would be preferable.

Escrito originalmente por johndrinkwater:
Get dynamic-dpi buttons to work? Stuff like that would be great if built in and supported…

I'm pretty certain due to setups friends have for CAD boxes you can set that up somehows, but at the moment it does involve some hoop jumping. But TBH as far as I'm concerned in games it's cheating and would rather it was not supported in Steam at all...

Not my itch, won't be scratching it, but sure someone will do soon enough.

Escrito originalmente por johndrinkwater:
Then there’s stuff like a Nostromo gaming pad, needs a 3rd party utility from launchpad that is complex to use.

Again something I count as cheating so I aint going to do anything that helps make it easy for people to do it myself. But Canonical and the rest of the community, even the none gamers, seemed to be majorly stoked at the idea of having mainstream gaming come to Linux in a meaningful way. They want Ubuntu to be THE gaming *nix and supporting most hardware out of the box will be a must for that.

Personally I'd expect a lot of working open solutions not in the repos to be picked apart and have more Ubuntuish solutions based on them hit the package managers soon and start been part of the standard install in 13.04.

But the best solution would be this: If a company refuses to be standards compliant and/or provide drivers for your OS of choice, buy from someone else and let them know that they've lost a sale and why.
Última edição por RobotMenace; 20/nov/2012 às 7:37
MonoBOY 20/nov/2012 às 8:41 
Next week - Borderlands 2 on Mac , we need it on Linux
Alastair Campbell 20/nov/2012 às 9:55 
I must admit, when I read "SSH into your mouse to change the bindings", I giggled a little.

For me, decent hardware drivers are so, so important. Ideally, FOSS is perfect for this because we get the crowd sourced driver updates even for the most obscure of devices. Logitech is a big player in the peripherals world and we'd be foolish to discount them. Peripherals are a big market, especially for gamers, who can only be pleased to hear that there is native support for their device in Linux, and that it works just as well or even better than it does on windows.
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Publicado em: 19/nov/2012 às 8:32
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