Mows Mar 26, 2013 @ 10:33pm
Steam wine configuration, similar to PlayOnLinux?
I don't know if there are licensing issues or whatnot, but an idea struck me that I've only heard mentioned a few times before and not in a dedicated topic. (at least not one I've found)

PlayOnLinux configures wine for you to run games, or you could even use winetricks, but why not have Steam do that itself? At the very least, setting up a system to handle it would give developers the option of setting up a wine configuration so that linux users could play their games without the need to port them, or as a stopgap measure until a port is available.

More games playable = more sales

So, just an idea. Any thoughts?
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d10sfan Mar 26, 2013 @ 11:02pm 
There's been alot of threads about this in Suggestions, basically letting developers setup a wine config using Steam on Linux.

Personally, I'm against it, because it means that developers are less likely to actually port their games to Linux. Plus, most Steam games require Steam to be running, which is going to be a problem, seeing as two Steam instances would be trying to run at the same time
Mows Mar 26, 2013 @ 11:26pm 
Ah, well I was meaning more in the sense of discussion rather than the suggestions area. I figure if it gets hashed out and then suggested, it keeps the mess that always happens when someone posits a half-baked idea like this one.

I made the switch to linux a bit after XCOM came out, and while I haven't tried for a month or so, it gave me fits trying to get it to run in wine. I've been itching to play it, but not bad enough to hook up the hard drive that still has windows on it that I kept in case the linux thing didn't work out.

The thing is, some devs aren't going to port. Team Meat has been rather blunt about it, and that they pushed the Super Meat Boy port over to someone else just because Humble Bundle required it. If you didn't get it then, you can't get it (legally) now. The guy that was involved with CounterStrike that's releasing a new game actually says if you use linux, that the first step is to buy windows. Literally, it says it on the faqs.

I've seen random snippets of people even being distrustful of Valve for supporting linux and refusing to port games out of a sense of rebellion.

Then of course there are linux ports for games, that are fully supported by the developers, that still aren't on Steam yet because... well who knows at this point.

It's a situation where money talks. It's not important to them because they're already making money off windows users. If there were a wine or wine-like option to run a game in compatibility mode, they'd get the metrics that linux users are buying and playing their games. That would carry more weight than just asking them to do it.
dubstepdeejay Mar 27, 2013 @ 2:03am 
I'm just curious as to why people don't run Linux on hard drive 1 for all their computer needs, and Windows on hard drive 2 for their gaming. I suppose there's the arguement of some games running better in Linux, but then I'd also bring up all the crashes in other games for Linux. More importantly, title availability in Windows is miles ahead of Linux.

It just seems too easy of a method having separate HDs for one's needs . . . know what you're gonna be doing once your computer is booted, hit up the bios, prioritize whichever HD to boot from and the problems are over.

Hard drives are cheap . . . and Win7 is just as free as Linux if ya go about it the right (wrong) way. I don't get it.
^1Gentoo Mar 27, 2013 @ 2:43am 
Seems like you guy's missed Grub completely.
instabilis Mar 27, 2013 @ 2:43am 
Originally posted by dubstepdeejay:
More importantly, title availability in Windows is miles ahead of Linux.
That is the problem, currently there is not much competition, which is bad for the PC gaming industry.

Originally posted by dubstepdeejay:
Hard drives are cheap . . . and Win7 is just as free as Linux if ya go about it the right (wrong) way. I don't get it.
Price is not an issue.
Last edited by instabilis; Mar 27, 2013 @ 2:44am
Turambar Mar 27, 2013 @ 2:48am 
I do have a dual boot, and I can tell you out of experience that you grow really tired of having to boot all the time.

You do not always do only one single thing on your computer, so you might have to boot at one point if the tool/app/game/whatever is not available on you current OS. Or you just not do the thing because you're fed up with having to change OS all the time (like how I nearly don't play Rocksmith anymore since I hate having to boot Windows just for a 30min guitar session). So dual OS is not what I call problem solving.

And even if I do feel like only playing, I still hate how Windows harass me with stupid pop-ups telling me to change the damn color sets when I alt-tab, or pestering me to reboot after updating, or watever else completely non-objective reasons that I might have.

The thing is I do not like using Windows. It does the job most of the time, but I'd just rather use Linux instead. Call it peronnal preference.

Hence the whole point of gaming on Linux. It's not that it's necessarily better, it's just that some people are tired of having to suffer Windows (to cope with it), and have in some cases reduced or stopped gaming because of it.

-> market -> profit
tangram § GNU/Linux Mar 27, 2013 @ 5:17am 
There's is another alternative to dual boot and WINE... it's called VGA passthrough.

The Xen and KVM hypervisors allow for the creation of virtual machines in which you directly assign PCI devices such as graphics cards to the virtual machines. Performance is something like +90% of bare-metal.

It does however require technical knowledge and proper hardware but you get the advantage of near native speed with the benefits of virtualization (toying around, snapshots, etc).

I for one run Xen on Debian and use a Windows 8 VM for gaming and Linux VMs on a daily basis.
d10sfan Mar 27, 2013 @ 8:13am 
Dual booting gets tiresome. I'd much rather have the whole drive dedicated to Linux
Kano Mar 27, 2013 @ 8:55am 
You don't need to configure much for Steam, just disable the dwrite lib (as it is buggy) and for some valve games you have to configure a drive letter (like e:) for you Win drive. Then you can easyly play the games which are supported via Wine. It is not needed that you install the games twice for Windows+Wine.
d10sfan Mar 27, 2013 @ 12:51pm 
Originally posted by Kano:
You don't need to configure much for Steam, just disable the dwrite lib (as it is buggy) and for some valve games you have to configure a drive letter (like e:) for you Win drive. Then you can easyly play the games which are supported via Wine. It is not needed that you install the games twice for Windows+Wine.
Meant that you have to login to use Steam. Unless you use offline mode, you would need to close native steam and launch wine steam, which is tedious
GiLuKs Mar 27, 2013 @ 3:38pm 
most games seem to work just fine with wine/playonlinux and windos steam client.
only time i ran into trouble are those damned games that rely on dotnet and what not..
but its only a matter of time before that gets resolved to... so in the end 99% of windows programs will run fine on linux... but... it's better indeed to have it run natively...

i think it's just al in the mind... most poeple's argument against linux is lack of proper gaming... i suspect steam in linux is gonna be respobsibel for the long anticipated great 'breakthrough' for linux... not bad job for a company that was initially founded by ex-MS employees ;)
Kano Mar 28, 2013 @ 2:51am 
Of course you have to close Steam/Linux when you use Steam/Wine. I used that setup for benchmarking without huge issues. With Nvidia hardware you could even play Rage at nice speed.
Cybertao Mar 28, 2013 @ 3:44am 
http://steamforlinux.com/?q=en/node/165

John Carmack thinks it would be better to support emulation than native ports, and he's right. There are a lot of games that run flawlessly in WINE when they were never designed to be. It's easier for a Windows centric developer to port their games to WINE than try and mash them into native Linux ports. It's even possible to make 'native' WINE ports by using the bindings they provide.
Kano Mar 28, 2013 @ 5:19am 
I would not say that as general rule but games that use OpenGL usally don't suffer from a speed decrease, sometimes Wine can be even faster than unoptimized native Linux ports (look at KF). In case D3D is used then the things are different, you usually have got a huge speed penalty when you run those games. Optimizing for Linux or OpenGL can be a hard task for devs used to D3D only. I see that with SS3 as well, with OpenGL is there similar speed on Linux+Win but the game itself is too slow with OpenGL. I don't think the problem itself is OpenGL, games like Rage which are heavly profiled to get best speed can run fine when the driver is good - fglrx still can not run that game via Wine properly, on Win Rage works even with CrossFire - really weird.
Last edited by Kano; Mar 28, 2013 @ 5:20am
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Date Posted: Mar 26, 2013 @ 10:33pm
Posts: 14