Wh!te girl Mar 26, 2013 @ 1:26am
Steam won't download games on other hard drive anymore.
Other hard drive is formatted in NTFS. I created a new folder specified for Steam Linux games. It used to work fine, I had no problem downloading games to other hard drive (NTFS) and playing it. But now, probably after an update, it stopped working.

When I select the folder on other hard drive in installation screen, Steam detects it as 0 MB available space, even though it has plenty of available space. I also tried installing Counter-Strike on default /home directory, it returns an error. Only game I got working so far is Team Fortress 2, which is installed on default /home directory. But I really want to install games on other hard drive because I don't have sufficient space on SSD, it used to work, but not anymore. What happened?
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Shark Mar 26, 2013 @ 1:34am 
You do not have the right permissions by default to do this on an NTFS filesystem, here is a solution http://cjenkins.wordpress.com/2013/01/01/steam-for-linux-on-optimus-enabled-computer-running-ubuntu-12-04-64bits/#optinal_configure_ntfs_partition
Thyriel Mar 26, 2013 @ 1:40am 
a more "linux like" way would be shrinking the ntfs partition and creating an ext4 partition for steam.
You could then even mount the new steam partition directly into ~/.local/steam/SteamApps so you can even install TF2 on another partition
LOLCAT Mar 26, 2013 @ 2:23am 
If that NTFS partition happens to belong to Win8, disable hybrid boot as it leaves the dirty flag open. It confuses even other versions of Windows, not to mention ntfs-3g. If it belongs to another version of Windows, just boot it and run chkdsk on the drive. If it used to work, it cannot be a problem with permissions.
Wh!te girl Mar 26, 2013 @ 4:36am 
Originally posted by LOLCAT:
If that NTFS partition happens to belong to Win8, disable hybrid boot as it leaves the dirty flag open. It confuses even other versions of Windows, not to mention ntfs-3g. If it belongs to another version of Windows, just boot it and run chkdsk on the drive. If it used to work, it cannot be a problem with permissions.

It's an empty harddrive with NTFS format, I use it for storage, for Linux and Windows.

I'll try above answers, also, I noticed that the folder "SteamApps" was created inside the Steam folder, but it's empty.
Letalis Sonus Mar 26, 2013 @ 5:54am 
There's BTW a really good working ext2/3/4 driver for Windows: http://www.ext2fsd.com

Note that when working with NTFS it can always happen that you get no write access due to the dirty flag, an unclean shutdown of either system and you'll only get it in read-only mode. Linux' drivers don't dare to touch any 'dirty' filesystems, only a forced mount can work around that.
LOLCAT Mar 26, 2013 @ 6:58am 
Originally posted by Wh!te girl:
Originally posted by LOLCAT:
If that NTFS partition happens to belong to Win8, disable hybrid boot as it leaves the dirty flag open. It confuses even other versions of Windows, not to mention ntfs-3g. If it belongs to another version of Windows, just boot it and run chkdsk on the drive. If it used to work, it cannot be a problem with permissions.

It's an empty harddrive with NTFS format, I use it for storage, for Linux and Windows.

I'll try above answers, also, I noticed that the folder "SteamApps" was created inside the Steam folder, but it's empty.
Then borrow a windows DVD from someone, boot it and use the recovery console. Run chkdsk on the drive...
boot Mar 26, 2013 @ 7:02am 
Games can only by installed on other drives if they are using or were already converted to the new SteamPipe content delivery system.
Thyriel Mar 26, 2013 @ 7:03am 
Originally posted by boot:
Games can only by installed on other drives if they are using or were already converted to the new SteamPipe content delivery system.
not true ;)
See my post above, you can bypass that by mounting another drive into .local/steam/SteamApps
Last edited by Thyriel; Mar 26, 2013 @ 7:03am
Wh!te girl Mar 26, 2013 @ 8:39am 
Originally posted by LOLCAT:
Originally posted by Wh!te girl:

It's an empty harddrive with NTFS format, I use it for storage, for Linux and Windows.

I'll try above answers, also, I noticed that the folder "SteamApps" was created inside the Steam folder, but it's empty.
Then borrow a windows DVD from someone, boot it and use the recovery console. Run chkdsk on the drive...

Why should I do that? I use it for a storage, it works fine.

Originally posted by Thyriel:
Originally posted by boot:
Games can only by installed on other drives if they are using or were already converted to the new SteamPipe content delivery system.
not true ;)
See my post above, you can bypass that by mounting another drive into .local/steam/SteamApps

I don't want to mount the entire drive...
LOLCAT Mar 26, 2013 @ 9:19am 
Originally posted by Wh!te girl:
Why should I do that? I use it for a storage, it works fine.
Never heard of file system corruption? Maybe your issue just happened out of the blue sky.
Thyriel Mar 26, 2013 @ 9:25am 
Originally posted by LOLCAT:
Originally posted by Wh!te girl:
Why should I do that? I use it for a storage, it works fine.
Never heard of file system corruption? Maybe your issue just happened out of the blue sky.
Especially when using NTFS on linux. Its somehow "ok" for data storage like music or videos, but i would really not use it too often or even for programs or games.
Had it happen two times the last years that a power loss shredded my external NTFS drive leaving an unuseable RAW Partition. The same drive had that happen a dozend times under windows without any problems. And its not like blackouts cant happen...
Letalis Sonus Mar 26, 2013 @ 12:56pm 
I never had any problems with file system corruption within Linux, and I have quite a lot of NTFS partitions permanently mounted.
The last time one of my NTFS partitions got corrupted was by installing SP3 on XP, it corrupted its own NTFS driver, which caused the system to weird out until the partition got busted - took 3 hours to recover (x2) and a reinstallation of SP3, that was like 4-5 years ago - all partitions from that time are still in use every day, within Linux.

NTFS is a journalling file system, as long as the driver does make use of this feature a simple power loss should not harm the partition's integrity - NTFS-3G automatically recovers damaged file systems via journal by default since 2009. NTFS is structurally way less robust than the ext file systems, though.
=(e)=™Drunken_Brewmaster Mar 28, 2013 @ 11:54am 
Like i said in another post just set your user mask in fstab so that a steam repository can be put there and then mount the drive or reboot. It needs executable permissions in usermode. Simplest is to use ntfs-3g driver and set the only options as umask=000. Just look in the main discussions part youll see the post if you need a example fstab line. Hopefully I was of help.
Wh!te girl Mar 30, 2013 @ 7:42am 
Originally posted by Thyriel:
a more "linux like" way would be shrinking the ntfs partition and creating an ext4 partition for steam.
You could then even mount the new steam partition directly into ~/.local/steam/SteamApps so you can even install TF2 on another partition

I've created the ext4 partition now. I'm lost on the part about mounting the partition, could you out the direction for me, please? I'm on Arch Linux, if that makes a difference.
Thyriel Mar 30, 2013 @ 7:44am 
Originally posted by Wh!te girl:
Originally posted by Thyriel:
a more "linux like" way would be shrinking the ntfs partition and creating an ext4 partition for steam.
You could then even mount the new steam partition directly into ~/.local/steam/SteamApps so you can even install TF2 on another partition

I've created the ext4 partition now. I'm lost on the part about mounting the partition, could you out the direction for me, please? I'm on Arch Linux, if that makes a difference.
https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Fstab
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Date Posted: Mar 26, 2013 @ 1:26am
Posts: 19