Junior s2 Camila Dec 19, 2013 @ 3:59pm
Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 Alpha 1 is out
Those who use Ubuntu and are willing to try the Alpha, post the comments on what are the differences from the previous releases in regards of:

* Steam install process

* Bug in games

Get it here: http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-gnome/releases/trusty/alpha-1/
Showing 1-15 of 30 comments
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ilcicali incazzato Feb 24 @ 2:42am 
I installed 14.04 alpha but can't run steam, here the error:
ILocalize::AddFile() failed to load file "public/steambootstrapper_english.txt".
[2014-02-24 11:42:22] Startup - updater built Nov 25 2013 18:07:05
Segmentation fault (core dumped)
/usr/games/steam: 16: /usr/games/steam: /home/user/.steam/steam.sh: not found


Revernus Feb 24 @ 6:07am 
If you like Ubuntu, I suggest you to try OpenSUSE 13.1. It's as easy as Ubuntu, everything works out of the box and it's a beautiful distro.
Mountaineer Feb 24 @ 8:08pm 
I tried a daily from the 18th.
I was prompted with regular error messages "Would you like to report this?" with no apparent consistency to the cause (just browsing through gnome shell menus etc).
Couldn't get any of the propietary drivers to work (all resulted in black screen).
Finally got working video by manually installing the nvidia binary from the shell script.
Then I did an apt-get update this morning and it's all broken again (I assume the nvidia dkms module failed to build properly).
At this point, I'm returning to xubuntu 13.10 for the time being.
Cybertao Feb 24 @ 10:42pm 
What did you expect from an alpha release?
Mountaineer Feb 25 @ 2:27pm 
Originally posted by Cybertao:
What did you expect from an alpha release?
Nothing, I'm reporting my findings as requested, I didn't even get to install steam.
Junior s2 Camila Feb 25 @ 6:55pm 
Originally posted by Mountaineer:
I tried a daily from the 18th.
I was prompted with regular error messages "Would you like to report this?" with no apparent consistency to the cause (just browsing through gnome shell menus etc).
Couldn't get any of the propietary drivers to work (all resulted in black screen).
Finally got working video by manually installing the nvidia binary from the shell script.
Then I did an apt-get update this morning and it's all broken again (I assume the nvidia dkms module failed to build properly).
At this point, I'm returning to xubuntu 13.10 for the time being.
That's why I don't use Ubuntu.
Cybertao Feb 25 @ 7:04pm 
No, that's why you shouldn't use alpha software unless you intend to actively test and improve the quality of it.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software_release_life_cycle#Alpha

Don't be telling people to use alpha software and then diss the project because there are bugs in it. If you don't like Ubuntu, why would you even consider signing on as one of its test monkeys?
Junior s2 Camila Feb 25 @ 7:41pm 
Because Ubuntu is never ready. Even 12.04 is giving problems to this day. They should not have predefined dates to release their software. Instead, they could do as Debian do and release it when it's ready.
R3450N Feb 25 @ 7:44pm 
Originally posted by Linux Junior s2 Camila:
Because Ubuntu is never ready. Even 12.04 is giving problems to this day. They should not have predefined dates to release their software. Instead, they could do as Debian do and release it when it's ready.

I think it's an OCD-kind of thing; if the devs release Ubuntu when it's ready then it would lose its numerical suffix. As in, 14.04 could end up being 15.07: released July 2015. I personally think Ubuntu should become a rolling release with two versions: development version and a stable version. Rolling out different versions every 6 months is silly and doesn't make sense.
Junior s2 Camila Feb 26 @ 6:20am 
Well, I don't see how losing it's numerical suffix is important. Who actually cares how their system is called? :P
I care much more about the system itself than how it's called. I know "Ubuntu 15.07" would be a terrible name, but they could change it to "Ubuntu 15", then "Ubuntu 16" and so on, and have a more reliable system.

Rolling out different versions every 6 months is silly and doesn't make sense.
Agreed.
Revernus Feb 26 @ 9:13am 
I agree, Ubuntu is never really "ready". Its fast paced schedule turns Ubuntu into a buggy distro. Also, Canonical has been displeasing open source community so much recently that Richard Stalman requested everybody to stop using Ubuntu. I honestly see no reason for someone to use it, there are lots of better distros out there.
R3450N Feb 26 @ 9:53am 
Originally posted by Revernus:
I agree, Ubuntu is never really "ready". Its fast paced schedule turns Ubuntu into a buggy distro. Also, Canonical has been displeasing open source community so much recently that Richard Stalman requested everybody to stop using Ubuntu. I honestly see no reason for someone to use it, there are lots of better distros out there.

Using Debian Unstable or 'safely': Debian Testing (not Debian Jessie) would provide some of the same software as Ubuntu uses, minus the proprietary drivers which you have to manually add in the repository section. My only problem with Debian is that it's too anti-proprietary and should at least allow users to activate them easily as Ubuntu does rather than bullying a user into using open source this and that without giving much of a user the same choice as they would have thereunder. Though Freedom (as in Freiheit) gives us so to use FOSS, it does not sympathise with the contrary; and so any decision to use proprietary software/drivers must be respected for the sake of Freedom.
Cybertao Feb 26 @ 12:05pm 
Debian doesn't stop you from using proprietary drivers or bully you into using open-source.
It's the vendor's responsibility to provide you with drivers, the same as with Windows. Sure, M$ provide some drivers in their updates; drivers that the vendors have paid WQHL fees to be included (which is why the drivers from there are often out of date).
Debian isn't recommended by the FSF because it supports and distributes non-free software. If installing your proprietary graphics card or printer isn't easy, take it up with the vendor who's responsible for providing support.
Junior s2 Camila Feb 26 @ 6:13pm 
I find it very easy to install proprietary drivers on Debian. I use nvidia so I can't tell for our fellow AMD users (soon myself).

But if we don't have proper support now, we will have it soon.
Revernus Feb 26 @ 7:22pm 
I'm not sure why you say that Debian stops you from using proprietary drivers or bully you into using open-source. You can add the tags "contrib" and "non-free" to official repository and installing proprietary software in Debian is exactly the same as in any other distro. You either install it using a third party repository, or via dpkg with a pre-compiled .deb package, or you compile the source code. Maybe you say that because of the policy of not providing proprietary drivers in the default ISO, but I ensure you this is just a mere formality to say that Debian supports the Open-source movement. If you need the proprietary drivers, you can download the ISO that includes them, it's that simple. Or you can download the proprietary drivers package and provide them during your offline installation, or you can add the tags "contrib" and "non-free" to your repositories during your online installation and install the proprietary drivers package. This is really not a big deal and it's not meant to be. It's only a message saying "hey, we like the Open-source movement and we support you guys".
Last edited by Revernus; Feb 26 @ 7:32pm
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Date Posted: Dec 19, 2013 @ 3:59pm
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