snse Apr 7, 2014 @ 9:07am
Install games on a seperate drive?
I have a separate partition set up (D: in Windows) for all my steam games. It is NTFS

Windows (8.1) reads the drive perfectly fine, and I have downloaded all my games to there.

I want to have Linux Mint 16 (cinnamon) read the drives and play the games from there, as I didn't give the Linux Mint install too much space and don't want to waste it on games. I thought I'd be able to quickly read from my other partition.

How can I do this? I mount the drive but it still wont show in steam?

Here is a picture showing the drive is mounted but not showing in steam
http://i.imgur.com/y0jeplz.png
Last edited by snse; Apr 7, 2014 @ 9:07am
Showing 1-15 of 31 comments
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phillippi2 Apr 7, 2014 @ 10:21am 
If I remember correctly, steam for linux doesn't like using windows partitions for storing games. It's probably to make a new partition in one of linux's preferred formats, such as ext4. Of course, Windows won't be able to read it and will ask you to reformat to a windows compatible format. I have read that you can install new drivers to fix this, though, and make windows be able to read it.
snse Apr 7, 2014 @ 11:00am 
Originally posted by phillippi2:
If I remember correctly, steam for linux doesn't like using windows partitions for storing games. It's probably to make a new partition in one of linux's preferred formats, such as ext4. Of course, Windows won't be able to read it and will ask you to reformat to a windows compatible format. I have read that you can install new drivers to fix this, though, and make windows be able to read it.
Is there a format that both Windows and Linux can read without any extra drivers?
Fibbles Apr 7, 2014 @ 11:11am 
Linux should be able to read NTFS drives. The other format that both Linux and Windows can both read is FAT32. However, FAT32 can't handle single files that are bigger than 4GB.

If you want a separate drive or partition to show in Steam you must mount the drive before starting Steam. However, if you're planning to have Steam for Linux load game files from your Steam for Windows folder then you're likely to run into a lot of problems.
^1Gentoo Apr 7, 2014 @ 11:19am 
The problem being that Steam doesn't magically find it just because you mounted it. You have to add the install folder in Steam.
DerRidda Apr 7, 2014 @ 11:27am 
AFAIK you can read and write to NTFS partitions but by default you won't be able to execute programs from there, there are ways to work around that though but I would recommend against it.

Also keep on mind that Steam for Windows and Linux can not share the same Library between each other.

The best bet would be to first BACK UP YOUR FILES and then shrink the NTFS partition and create a new ext4 partition on the same drive. That's what I did.
snse Apr 7, 2014 @ 11:33am 
Originally posted by DerRidda:
AFAIK you can read and write to NTFS partitions but by default you won't be able to execute programs from there, there are ways to work around that though but I would recommend against it.

Also keep on mind that Steam for Windows and Linux can not share the same Library between each other.

The best bet would be to first BACK UP YOUR FILES and then shrink the NTFS partition and create a new ext4 partition on the same drive. That's what I did.

The problem is I'm keeping windows for playing Windows only games

Originally posted by Fibbles:
Linux should be able to read NTFS drives. The other format that both Linux and Windows can both read is FAT32. However, FAT32 can't handle single files that are bigger than 4GB.

If you want a separate drive or partition to show in Steam you must mount the drive before starting Steam. However, if you're planning to have Steam for Linux load game files from your Steam for Windows folder then you're likely to run into a lot of problems.

I'm not trying to play games from the Steam for Windows folder, I made a seperate partition for my steam games, and I want to play on them from there. The steam for windows is installed in C: while my games are in my D: partition
wt7 Apr 7, 2014 @ 11:48am 
From: http://steamcommunity.com/app/221410/discussions/0/864977026161236192
This might help:
http://steamcommunity.com/app/221410/discussions/0/828940421699730568/?tscn=1369776466
First, use Gparted to create an ext4 partition on your drive of choice.
If you have an external ext4 partition, then you need to give it a permanent mount point and take ownership.
To take ownership, see this → http://askubuntu.com/questions/90339/how-do-i-set-read-write-permissions-my-hard-drives
and to give a permanent moint point I followed this →http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1668813
"Ubuntu will automatically mount non system disks that aren't specified in fstab at /media/LABEL or /media/UUID.
If you want to automatically mount the partition with your own permissions specified then I would follow these steps:
[1] Unmount the partition if it's already mounted:
sudo umount "/media/Storage" or whatever your partition's name is
[2] Create a permanent mount point at that location:
sudo mkdir /media/Storage
[3] Add a line to /etc/fstab - (**based on the info in this post:http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1668813)
/dev/sda3 /media/Storage ntfs defaults,nls=utf8,umask=0000,uid=1000 0 0
[4] Save fstab and in a terminal run this command:
sudo mount -a
If there are any errors "mount -a" will display them. If not it will mount your new partition."
+taken from http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1668813

In the same situation, this helped me successfully create a working extended Steam Library on an ext4 partition. Most games can be safely placed on a drive of your chosing.
*helpful fstab edit info: http://ubuntuforums.org/archive/index.php/t-1855962.html
Fibbles Apr 7, 2014 @ 11:53am 
To download Steam games to a different partition:
- Mount your partition.
- Start Steam for Linux.
- Click 'Steam' then 'Settings' (should be on the top left)
- Click 'Downloads' on the left pane
- Click 'Steam library folders'
- Create a new library on your separate partition

To add 3rd party games from a separate partition to Steam:
- Mount your partition.
- Start Steam for Linux.
- Click 'Games' then 'Add non-Steam game to my library' (should be on the top left)
- Click 'Browse'
- Navigate to your mounted partition (if you're on Ubuntu it usually auto-mounts to /media/user_name/partition_name/)
snse Apr 7, 2014 @ 12:06pm 
Originally posted by Fibbles:
To download Steam games to a different partition:
- Mount your partition.
- Start Steam for Linux.
- Click 'Steam' then 'Settings' (should be on the top left)
- Click 'Downloads' on the left pane
- Click 'Steam library folders'
- Create a new library on your separate partition

To add 3rd party games from a separate partition to Steam:
- Mount your partition.
- Start Steam for Linux.
- Click 'Games' then 'Add non-Steam game to my library' (should be on the top left)
- Click 'Browse'
- Navigate to your mounted partition (if you're on Ubuntu it usually auto-mounts to /media/user_name/partition_name/)
DId that, mounted the drive and started Steam. I select Steam library folders and the only place that's showing up is '/'. Not my steam drive
Fibbles Apr 7, 2014 @ 12:38pm 
Linux directory structure is different to that of Windows. No matter how many drives or partitions you have there is only one top level directory called 'root'. The root directory is represented by '/'.

Your separate drive is likely mounted in '/media/user_name/partition_name/'.
I.e. 'Root -> media -> user_name -> partition_name'.
Last edited by Fibbles; Apr 7, 2014 @ 12:41pm
snse Apr 7, 2014 @ 12:41pm 
Originally posted by Fibbles:
Linux directory structure is different to that of Windows. No matter how many drives or partitions you have there is only one top level directory called 'root'. Root is represented by '/'.

Your separate drive is likely mounted in '/media/user_name/partition_name/'.
I.e. 'Root -> media -> user_name -> partition_name'.
Thanks. Relatively new to Linux so didn't know that.
I'll try this later and post back
snse Apr 7, 2014 @ 1:44pm 
Originally posted by Fibbles:
Linux directory structure is different to that of Windows. No matter how many drives or partitions you have there is only one top level directory called 'root'. The root directory is represented by '/'.

Your separate drive is likely mounted in '/media/user_name/partition_name/'.
I.e. 'Root -> media -> user_name -> partition_name'.
It was in that folder, but I get this error http://i.imgur.com/yBgnXjg.png

Any idea how to fix that?

EDIT: I read somewhere that SteamLibrary requires read-write access. How do I do that without affecting it from working on Windows as well?
Would chmod -R 0777 SteamLibrary work?
Last edited by snse; Apr 7, 2014 @ 2:18pm
Fibbles Apr 7, 2014 @ 2:35pm 
Hmm, looks like Mint doesn't give executable permissions on mounted drives or partitions, not sure why. The easiest way to change that is to open a terminal window (it should be in your application menu somewhere) and enter the following:

sudo chmod -R 775 /media/your_user_name/name_of_your_partition/

There might be a way to do the same using the GUI but I don't use Mint so I wouldn't know.
Last edited by Fibbles; Apr 7, 2014 @ 3:17pm
Fibbles Apr 7, 2014 @ 2:38pm 
Originally posted by ДКsuomyn0na:
EDIT: I read somewhere that SteamLibrary requires read-write access. How do I do that without affecting it from working on Windows as well?
Would chmod -R 0777 SteamLibrary work?

AFAIK, Windows doesn't give a damn about Linux file permissions :P
Last edited by Fibbles; Apr 7, 2014 @ 2:39pm
snse Apr 7, 2014 @ 2:41pm 
Originally posted by Fibbles:
Originally posted by ДКsuomyn0na:
EDIT: I read somewhere that SteamLibrary requires read-write access. How do I do that without affecting it from working on Windows as well?
Would chmod -R 0777 SteamLibrary work?

AFAIK, Windows doesn't give a damn about Linux file permissions :P
Thanks I'll try doing the terminal command you stated
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Date Posted: Apr 7, 2014 @ 9:07am
Posts: 31