Steam for Linux

Steam for Linux

SteamOS or ps4/xbox1
I have been searching for AA/AAA games planed/rumors for steamos there are not many to find i allways have been PS console fan but after ps2 game did not work on ps3 and now ps3 games will not work on ps4 i wanted too look at steamos but i have no clue if i will be able to play games like : Gta5 or Elder scroll online i use linux as desktop/gaming computer but it is realy close that elder scroll online will be releasted so i am realy not sure if i should wait for steamos or not if anyone have some idea on what games are planed/rumor would help alot making that dissision.
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Showing 1-15 of 15 comments
labyrinth Feb 26, 2014 @ 4:36am 
You can buy your console because I don't think any of the big gaming companies will bother with Linux any time soon.
UraniumDeer Feb 26, 2014 @ 4:55am 
Originally posted by ESO Support:
WILL THERE EVER BE A LINUX VERSION?
Updated 02/20/2014 10:28 AM Published 11/06/2012 03:00 PM
We're currently developing The Elder Scrolls Online for PC (Windows OS) and Mac computer operating systems as well as PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. We don't have plans to support other operating systems such as Linux.

According to wiki, GTA V uses the RAGE engine, which only ever supported Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, and OS X. That said, there are rumors that a programmer in the game is dissing OS's that apparently looks like OS X and Windows - or something along those lines. With SDL, it should be possible, but it seems that no one knows.

It seems that the new Thief will have Mantle support, along with the newest Battlefield, which could suggest relatively easy porting to Linux, if you're sporting a newer AMD graphics card, as it seems that intel and nVidia has no plans of supporting Mantle.

I found this awesome page once, that listed listed rumored, under development, and released games for Linux. I can't find it now though. But, here's a list of pages about linux gaming:
http://www.pixelprospector.com/the-big-list-of-linux-game-sites/
and here i was sooooo excited for steamos :(
then maybe i will look at when i get bored of ps4
Last edited by ALL TIM GET NOOB TEEM; Feb 26, 2014 @ 6:14am
Sunr' ever Feb 26, 2014 @ 6:02am 
Well, it doesn't depend only on Valve... other companies must start developing ports for Linux too. That's why from now on I only buy Linux games, I wan't to incentive the ones who do that.
i had 2 games skyrim and morrowwind now i have more than 50 and all linux supported
and i use wine for skyrim and open mw
Sunr' ever Feb 26, 2014 @ 9:16am 
I use VirtualBox to emulate some Windows games I previously aquired too, but I don't suggest a begginer user to rely on these workarounds. You either accept that you'll only play native Linux games or you install a dual boot. Or buy a PS4 to play mainstream games.
Last edited by Sunr' ever; Feb 26, 2014 @ 9:17am
UraniumDeer Feb 26, 2014 @ 9:25am 
SteamOS is making game developers look towards Linux.
Valve is doing a lot of work, in making porting to Linux easier and better, while trying to lure devs into supporting Linux.
Some of the very high-end graphic engines (Unity, Unreal, Unigine, Jade (CryEngine 3 is being ported to Linux)) has supported Linux for a while, so it's a matter of porting the rest of the game to Linux.
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I have the idea that the greatest amount of work in a game lies within the graphic engine, sounds, textures, and maps. If the graphic engine supports multiple platforms, the amount of work in porting a game should be relatively 'small'.
maybe i will just wait untill steamos will get out of beta and see what i can do then, elder scroll and gta v can wait :)
MadXav Feb 26, 2014 @ 10:30am 
I recommend you to wait. It all depends on how much SteamOS succedes since porting the games shouldn't be hard for developers considering that all Sony, Mac, and SteamOS use OpenGL.
Here is a list of games confirmed to be ported/released for SteamOS (The OP keeps track off it, and updates it as they are announced. Here are not the once already there): http://steamcommunity.com/app/223300/discussions/0/648816743299506432/
You most keep in mind that more than 200 games have been ported since SteamOS was announced.
Last edited by MadXav; Feb 26, 2014 @ 10:31am
there are alot of intresting games on that list, finaly portal2 on the way :)
UraniumDeer Feb 26, 2014 @ 2:03pm 
If you're into Carmageddon, the new Carmageddon reincarnation is comming to Linux :)
Sunr' ever Feb 26, 2014 @ 7:36pm 
Originally posted by UraniumDeer:
SteamOS is making game developers look towards Linux.
Valve is doing a lot of work, in making porting to Linux easier and better, while trying to lure devs into supporting Linux.
Some of the very high-end graphic engines (Unity, Unreal, Unigine, Jade (CryEngine 3 is being ported to Linux)) has supported Linux for a while, so it's a matter of porting the rest of the game to Linux.
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I have the idea that the greatest amount of work in a game lies within the graphic engine, sounds, textures, and maps. If the graphic engine supports multiple platforms, the amount of work in porting a game should be relatively 'small'.

You are probably right because most games are made in C++, what might get in the way are the engine and windows specific libraries/API.
thetargos Feb 26, 2014 @ 8:27pm 
While I agree that most of the heavy coding for games goes to the graphics engine, when companies use an already established engine to make their game, the amount of work is less... Unless such company wants to add some spicey bits to the engine, by means of x, y, z features found in x, y, z SDKs and libraries, tied to a specific platform... The most prominent piece of software that got bit by the middleware bug in Linux was UT3... And while these libraries usually tie to the graphics engine, other stuff such as physics simulation, advanced AI threading, sound and music dynamic mixing or some other network features may actually rely on APIs/libraries not availabe in Linux, and their parent companies lacking any incentive to port those to Linux, which in turn causes the game studio/developer to not be able to actually port the game to Linux... And Linux is not the only one in this situation, MacOS X does as well, even though it might be a more "prominent" platform in the eyes of developers.

By means of Steam becoming a true platform (OS, i.e infrastructure) and all, I do believe that more and more developers (game studios and supporting libraries/APIs) will also follow suit, but Valve has to assure them that the ever changing nature of Linux (as it is seen in the eyes of many proprietary software vendors, with whose buisness and developing models they are unable to actually "keep up") will not be an issue for a consistent SDK and "stable" platform (as in infrastructure core libraries and tools versions persisting long enough, giving them time to adjust when upgrades occur, etc), much as it is the case for OS X and Windows with X Code and VisualStudio. Yes, long time users as many of us know that this argument is a m00t point and that it is fairly easy to circumvent these... but for the larger part of developers it is not known... Plus at the rate infrastructural programs such as GCC and LLVM/Clang change in the course of a year, might raise concern (again, long time users and developers know better and know that it is again a none issue), I'm only stating what I've read spread across various discussions.

And lets not forget one paramount point for corporations: Support and assurance, even if they never use it, Valve has to keep a close relation with the companies developing for thier platform and now their OS, addressing any possible issue that might arise in the process in order to accomplish full product support and functionality at release. In the case of independent deelopers and even when game studios hire people to do their porting, Valve has to keep a close relation in order to make sure the games and apps will actually work. So yeah, it is a multilateral task and endeavor to port and develop for Steam on Linux and SteamOS. And another key issue here is: Doing it this way, the inherent dependency on Steam is actually source of grief for some long-time Linux game developers and other FOSS developers.

Personally, I like how things are being done, and the openness Valve has shown towards the Linux and FOSS developer community.
You could dual boot a SteamBox with Windows.
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Date Posted: Feb 26, 2014 @ 4:01am
Posts: 15