Proteus > General Discussions > Topic Details
Murtle Jun 5, 2013 @ 12:46pm
Very Disappointed
There is simply nothing here....
I bought this game after I had finished "Dear Esther" because that game had changed the way I view games as art.
This came onto Steam riding the heels of "Dear Esther" and billed itself as the same type of "artistic experience" of a game.
I will say again that there is simply nothing here. The world you enter is bland and uneventful with zero interaction or goal. It wouldn't be so bad if the world itself was pretty to look at but using this pixelated 4 bit art style was a cheap cop-out to knock something out quick and call it art.
The game fails on so many levels it's not even funny.
I'm not looking for world interaction or a definitive goal in artistic styled games, but this simply is devoid of anything at all!
This piece of tripe is something that the developers should be ashamed that they charge this much money for considering it looks like it was whipped up in an afternoon.....even if it was free (which it should have been in the first place) I would still say that the 91mb it took to download it would be a waste of bandwidth.

Sorry to any fans of the game that I have offended but when a game like this comes out, I feel a need to inform others of it's quality.

But this is only one gamers opinion so take it with a grain of salt.
Last edited by Murtle; Jun 5, 2013 @ 2:35pm
Showing 1-13 of 13 comments
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Festmache Jun 5, 2013 @ 1:31pm 
I disagree.

Whereas Dear Esther was interesting only for one playthrough and offered almost no interactivity at all, Proteus offers several (subtle and surprising) kinds of interactivity and also is slightly different each time because the islands are randomized. Like Dear Esther, it probably won't be interesting for dozens of hours, but I've played it through a couple of times and I like the relaxing vibe that the minimal graphics and the interactive music provide.

Personally I found Proteus far more interesting than Dear Esther, but well, it's probably just a matter of taste :)
Last edited by Festmache; Jun 21, 2013 @ 1:31pm
Breadfish Jun 5, 2013 @ 2:21pm 
I actually prefer this over Dear Esther.
I got Dear Esther recently with the new Humble Indie Bundle,
and while the game is very pretty, It's pretty frustating starting the entire game over if you quit, and taking one wrong turn means going the entire way back. Proteus is much more magical.
But hey, that's just my thought.
Murtle Jun 5, 2013 @ 2:33pm 
Originally posted by Inspector Gadget:
I actually prefer this over Dear Esther.
I got Dear Esther recently with the new Humble Indie Bundle,
and while the game is very pretty, It's pretty frustating starting the entire game over if you quit, and taking one wrong turn means going the entire way back. Proteus is much more magical.
But hey, that's just my thought.

Thats weird, Dear Esther had a quicksave button that worked great for me if I wanted to quit.
I don't know what you mean about "one wrong turn" either as it was extremely linear and only gave you one unexplored direction to travel for 95% of the game.

Proteus just seemed cheap for me in everything from artstyle to music and I couldn't experience this "magical" feeling that you and others I've heard on this forum talk about. Believe me, I really wanted to get into this game/artwork but it just seemed so absent of any cohesive theme or idea or even basic structure of artwork for me to appreciate.

I guess we'll just have to agree to disagree but I'm glad that some people enjoyed it. :)
Last edited by Murtle; Jun 5, 2013 @ 2:36pm
cyxceven Jun 5, 2013 @ 4:49pm 
I prefer Proteus for it's procedural content.
Danny Sleeves Jun 6, 2013 @ 7:34am 
Originally posted by Murtle:
Originally posted by Inspector Gadget:
I actually prefer this over Dear Esther.
I got Dear Esther recently with the new Humble Indie Bundle,
and while the game is very pretty, It's pretty frustating starting the entire game over if you quit, and taking one wrong turn means going the entire way back. Proteus is much more magical.
But hey, that's just my thought.

Thats weird, Dear Esther had a quicksave button that worked great for me if I wanted to quit.
I don't know what you mean about "one wrong turn" either as it was extremely linear and only gave you one unexplored direction to travel for 95% of the game.

Proteus just seemed cheap for me in everything from artstyle to music and I couldn't experience this "magical" feeling that you and others I've heard on this forum talk about. Believe me, I really wanted to get into this game/artwork but it just seemed so absent of any cohesive theme or idea or even basic structure of artwork for me to appreciate.

I guess we'll just have to agree to disagree but I'm glad that some people enjoyed it. :)
Thank you for being reasonable in your distaste as opposed to other people.
Ricardo Jun 6, 2013 @ 12:54pm 
Yes, I agree with comments like Inspector gadget and so on, I do not see that much difference. Dear Esther have better graphics, but it is slow like hell and punishes exploration. A bit pedantic as well IMO. This one is more relaxed and funny. I wont call none of them "masterpiece", but both are pretty and interesting experiments.
Last edited by Ricardo; Jun 6, 2013 @ 12:55pm
Santicolme Jun 6, 2013 @ 8:06pm 
I don't find Dear Esther to be pretty at all. Really. All you do is explore a desolated island that makes you feel dreadful, while Proteus gives you a big shiny musical island to explore.

I'm not saying anyone who plays Dear Esther sucks, because that's just stupid. I'm just voicing out my opinion :)
BlackmarketKraig Jun 17, 2013 @ 2:13pm 
Dear Esther and Proteus are very different experiences, beyind being first person perspective, solitary (mostly), taking place on a single island and having limited interraction with the environment.

Dear Esther focuses on narrative and creating characterization (though with a light touch) it is meant to manipulate how you feel and the conclusions you draw, like a good movie you may want to experience it again but probably not right away or too often.

Proteus, on the other hand is much more open to interpretation, you create your own narrative and, essentially, your own fun as your sense of wonder and awe (or lack thereof) as you explore the environment and figure out the quirks of the island. You may find yourself coming back to it repeatedly, but, probably, not for very long runs each time, like appreciating a painting or piece of music.
error_terminate_players Oct 19, 2013 @ 10:56am 
! NOT ANOTHER SOULESS GUY
ITS RELAXING AND IT SJOWS THE MAMAZINGNESS OF NATURE
THIS IS GETTING SOOOO ANOYING
Yesiamaduck Oct 21, 2013 @ 6:04pm 
I played Proteus for the first time in a while (got it around Christmas when in Beta, then played it again when it came back on steam) and unlike Dear Esther this 'game' is something I love coming back to every couple of months. When I'm in the right frame of mind (often late at night, or also, lets be honest, when I'm stoned) the are very few games/movies/books/albums/painting/etc that make me react the way Proteus does.

Whether it be the genuine feeling of excitement and upbeatness during Summer, over looking and seeing loads of firelflies off of a mountain in Autumn or the nostalgic feeling I get when walking around in the snow, it makes me reflect over my whole life and past memories and allows me to do so by being completely objective free and using appropriate music queues which do just enough to encourage an emotional response without being overbearing or forceful with it.

It's a completely organic experience whereas I feel Dear Esther is a heavily crafted and scripted one and whilst that has it's place I cannot appreciate it nearly as much as Proteus, but that's art for you, different people react to art in different ways so it's to be expected to have a wide range of responses and as much as I hate to say it... sort of justifies people on these forums totally missing what I deem completely obvious (because it's art, it's objective).

So enjoy Dear Esther but if you ever feel in a reflective mood or just kind of feeling really calm and relaxed try it again and just sit back and aimlessly wonder... it might click for you then.
Last edited by Yesiamaduck; Oct 21, 2013 @ 6:06pm
[Bushwood]Lowlight Oct 22, 2013 @ 4:05pm 
I loved 'Dear Esther.' That said, after a few playthroughs I didn't really want to play it again because it's an extremely sad story.

I've only played Proteus for about 15 minutes and at first I was kind of bewildered for much the same reasons as the OP. I do think this game is a bit overpriced.

I also don't use drugs, so there may be a side of this that I'm just missing out on as a result.

All of that said, I will admit that I found the environments relaxing, mostly due to the sound effects, but also the simple and suprising things like the way rain would come, followed by fog and low clouds. The game has an interesting way of suprising you in a very non-stressful way.

I can't see myself pouring a lot of my gaming time on this one but it isn't without it's merits for just relaxing. A part of me wishes it had 100s of bizarro achievements tied to some of the random discoveries in the game. I've run across a cabin in the middle of nowhere, a graveyard with stones that hummed ominously when I rubbed against them, and a bunch of wierd indians (or some kind of natives with wierd hatwear) on a hilltop, looking off into the horizon.

Maybe they were statues. They didn't move or anything. I'm not sure.

Something about finding these little things makes me imagine an associated narrative, although I'm not sure how long that novelty will last.
Last edited by [Bushwood]Lowlight; Oct 22, 2013 @ 4:06pm
Yesiamaduck Oct 23, 2013 @ 6:56am 
Originally posted by BushwoodLowlight:
I loved 'Dear Esther.' That said, after a few playthroughs I didn't really want to play it again because it's an extremely sad story.

I've only played Proteus for about 15 minutes and at first I was kind of bewildered for much the same reasons as the OP. I do think this game is a bit overpriced.

I also don't use drugs, so there may be a side of this that I'm just missing out on as a result.

All of that said, I will admit that I found the environments relaxing, mostly due to the sound effects, but also the simple and suprising things like the way rain would come, followed by fog and low clouds. The game has an interesting way of suprising you in a very non-stressful way.

I can't see myself pouring a lot of my gaming time on this one but it isn't without it's merits for just relaxing. A part of me wishes it had 100s of bizarro achievements tied to some of the random discoveries in the game. I've run across a cabin in the middle of nowhere, a graveyard with stones that hummed ominously when I rubbed against them, and a bunch of wierd indians (or some kind of natives with wierd hatwear) on a hilltop, looking off into the horizon.

Maybe they were statues. They didn't move or anything. I'm not sure.

Something about finding these little things makes me imagine an associated narrative, although I'm not sure how long that novelty will last.:postcardf:

May I suggest trying the game when you're really relaxed and just before bed, I find thats when it makes the most amount of sense to me.
Evil.Kat Oct 24, 2013 @ 1:31pm 
Did the devs really compare it to Dear Esther?
I thought Dear Esther was quite terrible. Terrible pacing, and very mediocre writing (but the VA was OK I guess). I didn't like the "walk forward to get the next piece of the script at some arbitrary point" thing at all. It did have a few decent looking scenes, but that's about it..

Proteus was a bit disappointing to me as well. It had it's moments but overall it just felt too empty or lacking in some way. Both in the visual and audio department. They compare the music to Boards of Canada in the description, and while I'm not a huge fan of them, I don't think the music ever rises to anything near that level.
Still way better than Dear Esther though, and I will probably do another playthrough of Proteus at some point (never touching Dear Esther again).
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