Proteus > General Discussions > Topic Details
soap ninja! Oct 19, 2013 @ 11:13am
why hate proteus?
ive come across lots of people who hate this game but why? well if you hate it you are not using your imagination but al, you are doing are missjudging this game. so i say, please use your imagination and let the game lead you i know if you try you will continue.
in the comments put a 1-10 of how much you like this game.
Showing 1-15 of 18 comments
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soap ninja! Oct 19, 2013 @ 11:14am 
10 + 1000000000000000000000000000000000
0perator 88 Oct 26, 2013 @ 1:48am 
11. :)
El Maestro Oct 26, 2013 @ 8:23am 
Not using your imagination? Yeah, I can create a game where all you do is walk through a white tunnel and still use that argument. While a good imagination can make a mediocre game fun, a good imagination is no substitute for good game design.
Oettinger Pils Oct 27, 2013 @ 5:30pm 
8 and I loved hit (15 hours ingame). However, the seasons weren't really balanced, since summer was brimming with life and critter, whereas both spring and winter were kind of dull.
Spud Oct 30, 2013 @ 1:05am 
Originally posted by Deflect:
Not using your imagination? Yeah, I can create a game where all you do is walk through a white tunnel and still use that argument. While a good imagination can make a mediocre game fun, a good imagination is no substitute for good game design.
This isn't really a game... I don't think you can apply the same rules. Is the game meant to be "fun"? Is there a goal? I honestly just walked around looking at stuff going "what happens if I do this". That's all the fun! Not just getting to the end.
Zombie Drake Oct 30, 2013 @ 9:28am 
Proteus is absolutely a game.
Spud Oct 31, 2013 @ 5:58am 
Originally posted by Drake-ula:
Proteus is absolutely a game.
No it's not. It's an interactive art piece, but not a game.
blacky Oct 31, 2013 @ 9:11am 
I had really great time with Proteus :] even made Time-lapse video. Proteus Timelapse
Last edited by blacky; Oct 31, 2013 @ 9:16am
Zombie Drake Oct 31, 2013 @ 11:06am 
Originally posted by Potato Senpai:
Originally posted by Drake-ula:
Proteus is absolutely a game.
No it's not. It's an interactive art piece, but not a game.

Interactive art piece could describe just about any game. Proteus has rules and systems, which is what makes a game. Just because the game isn't about conflict resolution (solving problems whether by violence, puzzles, exploration, etc) doesn't mean it's not a game.


Last edited by Zombie Drake; Oct 31, 2013 @ 11:09am
Spud Oct 31, 2013 @ 4:43pm 
Originally posted by Drake-ula:
Originally posted by Potato Senpai:
No it's not. It's an interactive art piece, but not a game.

Interactive art piece could describe just about any game. Proteus has rules and systems, which is what makes a game. Just because the game isn't about conflict resolution (solving problems whether by violence, puzzles, exploration, etc) doesn't mean it's not a game.

In order for something to be a "game" it needs to have some form of "failure state". This is most comonly a game over screen but it's not restricted to that. It's true that any game could be an interactive art piece. As a matter of fact IN MY OPINION every game IS an interactive art piece. but that's not to say that every interactive art piece is a game. From the begining of time anything assiciated with the word "game" has had some form of failure or success. Sports games, chess, pac-man, those are games because they are forms of entertainment or art that involves either success or failure based on a persons skill. You could go to the forums for any other "interactive art piece" and see the same topics being talked about (The Stanly Parable and Dear Esther come to mind).
Zombie Drake Oct 31, 2013 @ 10:35pm 
Whether or not a fail state constitutes a game is a philosophical conversation that has gone on longer than we have been alive. Using these kinds of ephemeral concepts to define a thing in these kinds of discussions is problematic, especially when you are discussing a concept as old as games. Does a game of Cat's Cradle have a winner or a loser? Is it a competition? You could say that tangling the string is the fail state but experts at Cat's Cradle will be able to complete games without failure. Is avoiding this failstate the point? If not, is it important to the concept of a game or just a byproduct of the focus on skill that many games carry?

You may say AHA! That's IT! Proteus requires no skill! Therefore it cannot be a game! But then you will run into Chutes and Ladders and other similar games based on chance and luck.

In my personal opinion the really interesting question is why is an exclusionary definition of games important. The more criteria an activity needs to fill to become a game the more danger there is of running into the fallacy of No True Scotsman[en.wikipedia.org]. Why is it so important that Proteus, Dear Esther or the Stanley Parable aren't games? What is being protected?
Last edited by Zombie Drake; Oct 31, 2013 @ 10:36pm
sam Nov 1, 2013 @ 7:34am 
I failed proteus by getting lost in winter, so there!
A Dirty Smuggler Nov 3, 2013 @ 9:23pm 
It's pretentious horsecrap. The people who vehemently defend this game are likely doing so on their laptops in a Starbucks or other such trendy coffee shop, trying desperately to justify their bachelor's degree in Liberal Arts.
|TeM|Reik Van Damme Nov 4, 2013 @ 7:17am 
I think people's appreciation of this game is largely tied to their imaginational (?) intelligence.
I've just finished my first playthrough and within seconds of arriving on the island the game made me smile. Each season was a joy to explore, particularly the oppresive low cloud and muted music in the Winter time.
It's not a game/ experience for everyone of course, but I personally found it a welcome diversion from my normal diet of shooters, etc.
Definitely going to give it a late night replay with a nice glass of scotch this evening.
Spud Nov 4, 2013 @ 10:42am 
Originally posted by A Dirty Smuggler:
It's pretentious horsecrap. The people who vehemently defend this game are likely doing so on their laptops in a Starbucks or other such trendy coffee shop, trying desperately to justify their bachelor's degree in Liberal Arts.
Can I ask you something? What did you think of some of the other "games" that fall under the same genre? Examples would be Dear esther, Journey (ps3), or The Stanly Parable.
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