Cheff the Quack Sep 5, 2012 @ 4:18pm
Mind Blower: Borges's Right Cheek (Spoilers!)
Alright, so at the end of our little musical gun fight with the balloon-sentries, we're left with a single path in which to escort Borges. At the end of this short hall, we're greeted by the unfriendly silhouettes of several police officers, all of 'em eager to arrest the protagonists for the attempted airport-vault robbery. Shortly after this, the story jumps to a scene in which you are driving away from police cars as Borges shoots at them from the back window. I first assumed, and am assuming that everyone else assumed, (why else would I be posting all of this?) that the get-away scene takes place shortly after the hold-up outside the airport, and that the duo (somehow) managed to avoid the cops and began to flee the area, only to be hit by a truck driving in the opposite direction.

During my fourth run of the game, I discovered that Borges's right cheek is not bloody in the get-away scene. When I took a look at his right cheek during the airport bit, (which I discovered can only be done at one particular part of the airport, which makes me think it was intentionally left obscure) I discovered that during that scene, his right cheek is indeed bloody, which messes with my earlier interpretation of the story.

This can either mean that:
A. The get-away scene takes place before the hold-up scene.
B. The get-away scene takes place long after the hold-up scene.
C. The get-away scene takes place just after the hold-up scene, but Borges was cleaned up sometime between the two.
D. The main character is dillusional and imagines Borges as he normally is.
E. The creator goofed and used the wrong model for Borges in the get-away scene. (but that's unexciting, so let's all deny it)
F. One of the scenes never really happened.

Here's some images for reference:
http://i207.photobucket.com/albums/bb25/cheffdonty/2012-09-05_00005.jpg
http://i207.photobucket.com/albums/bb25/cheffdonty/2012-09-05_00003.jpg

What do you guys think?
Showing 1-8 of 8 comments
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doc Sep 5, 2012 @ 7:39pm 
I think this is the most attention I've heard of anyone paying this game. And I think that's ♥♥♥♥ing rad. This is a great little theory, the entire car and motocycle scene does seem to be the most obtuse of it all.
I really like option D - as hard as it might be to explain.
*Junon Sep 6, 2012 @ 8:00pm 
I think the player character is almost certainly imagining a scenario where they manage to get away. In fact I think the whole game is the PC's life flashing before their eyes intercut with the actual botched job and escape attempt, and a couple of fantasy scenarios like the successful getaway. Gravity Bone does something similar.

I don't know what to make of the very end, Bernoulli's Principle and whatnot.
Audrey Hepburn Sep 6, 2012 @ 8:01pm 
Good observation indeed :) I like A and D. The first is great because it implies the game does not take place chronologically - like the beautiful Pulp Fiction. The latter works extremely well because that would mean that Chung intended for this game to be a recollection of past events. That idea coupled with the art direction is pure genius; Citizen Abel, just like us, while unable to recall exact details of people and places, is able to invoke their general feel and appearance.

Whaddya think?
Audrey Hepburn Sep 6, 2012 @ 8:02pm 
@Junon I'm pretty sure the end was just for fun. Something to extend the experience slightly longer without much effort required from the creator. Perhaps he likes fluid dynamics :)
RobinOttens Sep 10, 2012 @ 5:31am 
I'd say a combination of B, C and D. There some time between the hold-up and the escape, in which Borges cleans his cheek and they manage to steal a cop car. And there's a bunch of information left out because half the time we're playing the main character's recollection of events, not literally the events as they happened.

This game's plot is quite the fun puzzle.

I took the Bernoulli epilogue to be part of some big metaphor about these outlaws being free spirits, birds in flight. All the flight/bird imagery. You know, with all the birds flying over that motorcycle ride. The airport as a setting. A literal flight from the cops and a plane-flight and such. Bernoulli's quote "all birds need to fly are the right-shaped wings, the right pressure and the right angle" can be somewhat applied to the main characters. You know, if you like overthinking these things. :) It's also just a dumb epilogue that's there for pacing, to give you the time to think and take in everything that just happened.
Last edited by RobinOttens; Sep 10, 2012 @ 5:32am
Cypher Sep 17, 2012 @ 10:00am 
I didnt pick up on this, but from my own opinions on the game, I'd say youre probably not wrong.
The wedding and motorbike scenes seem to be a prequal to the story, as Anita still has her arm and leg. The car chase could be too!
BLUEOGRE Nov 15, 2012 @ 2:04am 
Originally posted by RobinOttens:
I took the Bernoulli epilogue to be part of some big metaphor about these outlaws being free spirits, birds in flight. All the flight/bird imagery. You know, with all the birds flying over that motorcycle ride. The airport as a setting. A literal flight from the cops and a plane-flight and such. Bernoulli's quote "all birds need to fly are the right-shaped wings, the right pressure and the right angle" can be somewhat applied to the main characters. You know, if you like overthinking these things. :) It's also just a dumb epilogue that's there for pacing, to give you the time to think and take in everything that just happened.
I really like that interpretation for the Bernoulli epilogue
Mr. Orange Feb 14, 2014 @ 8:28pm 
Originally posted by Misha Hungry:
Originally posted by RobinOttens:
I took the Bernoulli epilogue to be part of some big metaphor about these outlaws being free spirits, birds in flight. All the flight/bird imagery. You know, with all the birds flying over that motorcycle ride. The airport as a setting. A literal flight from the cops and a plane-flight and such. Bernoulli's quote "all birds need to fly are the right-shaped wings, the right pressure and the right angle" can be somewhat applied to the main characters.

I also would like to note that, although this universe has space-faring tech, all of the planes have flat wings. The plane you fly is terribly designed for heavy transport flight. The whole game has these kinds of non-sensical, odd inconsistencies that make it what it is. I figure that Bernoulli's principle may be there to show how off the game is.
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